Special Issue "Vitamin D and Athletic Performance"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Insufficiency in Vitamin D is a serious problem in general internal medicine. Different disorders have been shown to be associated with Vitamin D deficiency. Certain populations, such as elderly people, are at an increased risk for osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures, among other problems.

In athletes, certain populations might be at a higher risk for Vitamin D deficiency. Little is known whether a supplementation in Vitamin D in athletes with deficiency in Vitamin D improves performance.

The first idea of this Special Issue, "Vitamin D and Athletic Performance", is to gain more information on the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in different sport disciplines (e.g., indoor sports) and populations (e.g., master athletes). The second idea is to see whether a supplementation of Vitamin D in certain populations of athletes with a deficiency can improve athletic performance.

Prof. Dr. med. Beat Knechtle
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vitamin
  • supplementation
  • deficiency
  • athlete
  • performance

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Vitamin D Status Differs by Sex, Sport-Season, and Skin Pigmentation among Elite Collegiate Basketball Players
Sports 2019, 7(11), 239; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports7110239 - 18 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2768
Abstract
Vitamin D plays a key role in bone health, musculoskeletal function, and sport performance. Collegiate athletes competing in indoor sports may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency due to limited outdoor time. Therefore, the purpose was to assess 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) [...] Read more.
Vitamin D plays a key role in bone health, musculoskeletal function, and sport performance. Collegiate athletes competing in indoor sports may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency due to limited outdoor time. Therefore, the purpose was to assess 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations among collegiate men and women basketball (MBB, WBB) athletes. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I men (MBB, n = 11) and women (WBB, n = 9) were tested during the off-season (T1; July) and pre-season (T2; October). Measurements included serum 25(OH)D; skin pigmentation, bone mineral density, and daily sun exposure (self-reported). Paired t-tests determined changes in 25(OH)D by sport-season and sex. Pearson correlations examined relationships between outcome variables. MBB athletes (mean ± SD; 19.6 ± 1.3 years) showed a reduction in 25(OH)D (T1: 64.53 nmol·L−1 ± 11.96) (T2: 56.11 nmol·L−1 ± 7.90) (p = 0.001). WBB (20.1 ± 1.1 years) had no change in 25(OH)D (T1: 99.07 nmol·L−1 ± 49.94. T2: 97.56 nmol·L−1 ± 36.47, p = 0.848). A positive association between 25(OH)D and skin pigmentation was observed (r = 0.47, p = 0.038). 25(OH)D was inversely correlated with lean body mass (LBM), body mass (BM), and bone mineral density (BMD), while a positive association was seen between 25(OH)D and skin pigmentation. In summary, 25(OH)D insufficiency was prevalent amongst male collegiate basketball athletes, with 25(OH)D levels being lower in the pre-season (October) than the off-season (July). Furthermore, darker skin pigmentation significantly correlated with 25(OH)D, indicating that individuals with darker skin tones may be at a greater risk of insufficiency/deficiency. More research is needed to examine the relationships between 25(OH)D and bone health in athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin D and Athletic Performance)
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