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Special Issue "2nd Edition: Sports and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2022 | Viewed by 2675

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The number of recreational athletes of both sexes and all age groups engaging in regular exercise training and participating in competitions (e.g., outdoors running races such as half-marathons) has increased during recent decades. This trend might be partially explained by the well-documented beneficial role of exercise for health. However, participating in sports has not been without risk for health, especially for recreational athletes who, unlike competitive runners, lack sport experience and the advantages of specialized and supervised training. Thus, the main challenge in this field is to provide evidence-based recommendations for optimal exercise levels to maximize the benefits for health and minimize the risks.

The aim of this Special Issue is to attract papers about the relationship between health and sport participation across all lifestyles, with an emphasis on recreational athletes. We encourage submissions of cross-sectional studies on large datasets of endurance athletes focusing on the relationship between performance and health outcomes. In addition, we especially welcome experimental studies that examine the effect of different training programs (varying for volume, intensity, frequency, mode, and recovery) of physiology and pathophysiology. Review articles describing the current state of the art in relevant topics are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Beat Knechtle
Dr. Pantelis T. Nikolaidis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Age
  • Cycling
  • Endurance
  • Hyponatremia
  • Musculoskeletal injury
  • Marathon
  • Nutrition
  • Sex
  • Swimming
  • Running
  • Master athlete
  • Recreational athlete
  • Women in sport

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Construct Validity and Reliability of a New Basketball Multidirectional Reactive Repeated Sprint Test
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10695; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182010695 - 12 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the construct validity and reliability of a new reactive multidirectional repeated sprinting test (RRSA5COD) in basketball players. Forty male basketball players were divided into two groups: Professional (PRO; n = 20) and Semi-professional [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate the construct validity and reliability of a new reactive multidirectional repeated sprinting test (RRSA5COD) in basketball players. Forty male basketball players were divided into two groups: Professional (PRO; n = 20) and Semi-professional (SEMI; n = 20). Participants completed the yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-YoIR1), the squat jump (SJ), the counter movement jump (CMJ), the single leg drop jump (DJ), the 20-m sprint test, the planed multidirectional repeated sprinting test (PRSA5COD), and the RRSA5COD test. Reaction time (RT) and movement time (MT), total time (TT), best time (BT), and fatigue index (FI) were assessed. Heart rate (HR) was continuously recorded, while rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration (LA) were measured post-tests. The reliability of the RRSA5COD test was also assessed between two attempts with one week between them. The RRSA5COD results demonstrated to be reliable with most of the variables showing ICC > 0.80. BA Bonferroni post hoc revealed a significant better TT in favor of RRSA5COD (p < 0.001; ES = 0.15; small), and in favor of PRO (p < 0.001; ES = 0.006; small). The result showed a significant better performance in favor of PRO in all physical fitness tests. In conclusion, it was found that the RRSA5COD discriminates between professional and semi-professional male basketball players, and the results were demonstrated to be reliable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Sports and Health)
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Article
Exploring Shank Circumference by Stretching after Training among Volleyball Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8849; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168849 - 22 Aug 2021
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Abstract
This preliminary study examined the effects of a stretching intervention after training and its duration (15 vs. 30 min) on participants’ shank circumference (SC) reduction and subjective discomfort score. Ten male volleyball players underwent a routine 3 h training. A two-way analysis of [...] Read more.
This preliminary study examined the effects of a stretching intervention after training and its duration (15 vs. 30 min) on participants’ shank circumference (SC) reduction and subjective discomfort score. Ten male volleyball players underwent a routine 3 h training. A two-way analysis of variance revealed that the stretching intervention had significant effects on SC reduction (p < 0.01) and subjective discomfort scores (p < 0.001). Stretching after training could help eliminate shank strain, and a slighter discomfort in shanks when stretching was also seen (score, 20.1/100). An independent-samples t test revealed a significantly higher SC reduction (p < 0.01) with 30 min of stretching (5.6 mm) than with 15 min of stretching (2.7 mm); both stretching durations reduced SC significantly more than the no-stretching condition did. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for volleyball players to alleviate shank strain after daily routine training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Sports and Health)
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Other

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Systematic Review
How Anthropometrics of Young and Adolescent Swimmers Influence Stroking Parameters and Performance? A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2543; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19052543 - 22 Feb 2022
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Abstract
The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between anthropometric characteristics, biomechanical variables and performance in the conventional swimming techniques in young and adolescent swimmers. A database search from 1 January 2001 to 30 June 2021 was done according to [...] Read more.
The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between anthropometric characteristics, biomechanical variables and performance in the conventional swimming techniques in young and adolescent swimmers. A database search from 1 January 2001 to 30 June 2021 was done according to the PRISMA statement, with 43 studies being selected for analysis. Those manuscripts were divided in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl techniques as main categories. The results showed the importance of the anthropometric variables for the performance of the young swimmer, although there was a lack of variables common to the studies that analysed the butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke techniques. For the front crawl technique there is a consensus among studies on the advantage of having higher height and arm span values, variables that concurrently with high body mass and lean body mass values, contribute positively to better stroke length and stoke index values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Sports and Health)
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