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Review

The Possible Role of Gut Microbiota and Microbial Translocation Profiling During Chemo-Free Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies

1
Infectious Diseases Unit, Fondazione IRCCS “San Matteo”, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2
U.O.C. Microbiologia e Virologia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
3
Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
4
Department of Hematology Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
5
Department of Medical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Science, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(7), 1748; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20071748
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
The crosstalk between gut microbiota (GM) and the immune system is intense and complex. When dysbiosis occurs, the resulting pro-inflammatory environment can lead to bacterial translocation, systemic immune activation, tissue damage, and cancerogenesis. GM composition seems to impact both the therapeutic activity and the side effects of anticancer treatment; in particular, robust evidence has shown that the GM modulates the response to immunotherapy in patients affected by metastatic melanoma. Despite accumulating knowledge supporting the role of GM composition in lymphomagenesis, unexplored areas still remain. No studies have been designed to investigate GM alteration in patients diagnosed with lymphoproliferative disorders and treated with chemo-free therapies, and the potential association between GM, therapy outcome, and immune-related adverse events has never been analyzed. Additional studies should be considered to create opportunities for a more tailored approach in this set of patients. In this review, we describe the possible role of the GM during chemo-free treatment of lymphoid malignancies. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiota; chemo free treatment; lymphoid malignancies gut microbiota; chemo free treatment; lymphoid malignancies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zuccaro, V.; Lombardi, A.; Asperges, E.; Sacchi, P.; Marone, P.; Gazzola, A.; Arcaini, L.; Bruno, R. The Possible Role of Gut Microbiota and Microbial Translocation Profiling During Chemo-Free Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 1748. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20071748

AMA Style

Zuccaro V, Lombardi A, Asperges E, Sacchi P, Marone P, Gazzola A, Arcaini L, Bruno R. The Possible Role of Gut Microbiota and Microbial Translocation Profiling During Chemo-Free Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(7):1748. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20071748

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zuccaro, Valentina, Andrea Lombardi, Erika Asperges, Paolo Sacchi, Piero Marone, Alessandra Gazzola, Luca Arcaini, and Raffaele Bruno. 2019. "The Possible Role of Gut Microbiota and Microbial Translocation Profiling During Chemo-Free Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 7: 1748. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20071748

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