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Article

“I Sometimes Ask Patients to Consider Spiritual Care”: Health Literacy and Culture in Mental Health Nursing Practice

Centre of Gerontological Nursing, School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3589; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193589
Received: 21 August 2019 / Revised: 20 September 2019 / Accepted: 21 September 2019 / Published: 25 September 2019
While health literacy influences better outcomes of mental health patients, sociocultural factors shape the nature of the relationship. On this matter, little is known about how sociocultural factors affect health literacy practices of nurses, especially in low-income countries. This paper examines how local precepts, within culture and language, shape mental health nurses’ (MHNs) practice and understanding of patients’ health literacy level in Ghana. The study used a qualitative descriptive design involving 43 MHNs from two psychiatric hospitals. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Although the MHNs acknowledged the importance of health literacy associated with patients’ health outcomes, their practice was strongly attributed to patients’ substantial reliance on cultural practices and beliefs that led to misinterpretation and non- compliance to treatments. MHNs shared similar sociocultural ideas with patients and admitted that these directed their health literacy practice. Additionally, numerous health system barriers influenced the adoption of health literacy screening tools, as well as the MHNs’ low health literacy skills. These findings suggest MHNs’ direct attention to the broader social determinants of health to enhance the understanding of culture and its impact on health literacy practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: health literacy; mental health nursing; culture; beliefs; Ghana health literacy; mental health nursing; culture; beliefs; Ghana
MDPI and ACS Style

Koduah, A.O.; Leung, A.Y.M.; Leung, D.Y.L.; Liu, J.Y.W. “I Sometimes Ask Patients to Consider Spiritual Care”: Health Literacy and Culture in Mental Health Nursing Practice. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3589. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193589

AMA Style

Koduah AO, Leung AYM, Leung DYL, Liu JYW. “I Sometimes Ask Patients to Consider Spiritual Care”: Health Literacy and Culture in Mental Health Nursing Practice. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(19):3589. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193589

Chicago/Turabian Style

Koduah, Adwoa O., Angela Y.M. Leung, Doris Y.L. Leung, and Justina Y.W. Liu 2019. "“I Sometimes Ask Patients to Consider Spiritual Care”: Health Literacy and Culture in Mental Health Nursing Practice" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 19: 3589. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193589

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