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Article

Vegetation Phenology in the Qilian Mountains and Its Response to Temperature from 1982 to 2014

by 1, 1,2,3,4, 1,2,3,4,5,*, 1, 1,4 and 1,2,3,4
1
Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
2
State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
4
Center for Geodata and Analysis, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
5
National Tibetan Plateau Data Center, Beijing 100101, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 December 2020 / Revised: 7 January 2021 / Accepted: 12 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Remote Sensing)
The vulnerability of vegetation ecosystems and hydrological systems in high-altitude areas makes their phenology more sensitive and their response to climate change more intense. The Qilian Mountains, an important geographic unit located in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP), has experienced the more significant increases in temperature and precipitation in the past few decades than most areas of the TP. However, under such intense climate change, the temporal and spatial differences in phenology in the Qilian Mountains are not clear. This study explored the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of phenology in the Qilian Mountains from 1982 to 2014 and its response to three temperature indicators, including the mean daily temperature (Tmean), mean daily daytime temperature (Tmax), and mean daily nighttime temperature (Tmin). The results showed that (1) as the altitude rose from southeast to northwest, the multiyear mean of the start of the growing season (SOS) was gradually delayed mainly from 120 to 190 days, the multiyear mean of the end of the growing season (EOS) as a whole was advanced (from 290 to 260 days), and the multiyear mean of the length of the growing season (LGS) was gradually shortened (from 150 to 80 days). (2) In general, there was an advanced trend in the annual average SOS (0.2 days per decade), a delayed trend in the annual average EOS (0.15 days per decade), and an extended trend in the annual average LGS (0.36 days per decade) over the study period. However, there has been no significant phenological trend in recent years, especially for the SOS after 2000 and the EOS and LGS after 2003. (3) Higher preseason temperatures led to an advanced SOS and a delayed EOS at the regional scale. Moreover, the SOS and EOS were more triggered by Tmax than Tmin and Tmean. The LGS was significantly positively correlated with annual mean temperature (r = −0.82, p < 0.01). View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetation phenology; NDVI; Qilian Mountains; temperature; climate change vegetation phenology; NDVI; Qilian Mountains; temperature; climate change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Qiao, C.; Shen, S.; Cheng, C.; Wu, J.; Jia, D.; Song, C. Vegetation Phenology in the Qilian Mountains and Its Response to Temperature from 1982 to 2014. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 286. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13020286

AMA Style

Qiao C, Shen S, Cheng C, Wu J, Jia D, Song C. Vegetation Phenology in the Qilian Mountains and Its Response to Temperature from 1982 to 2014. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(2):286. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13020286

Chicago/Turabian Style

Qiao, Cancan, Shi Shen, Changxiu Cheng, Junxu Wu, Duo Jia, and Changqing Song. 2021. "Vegetation Phenology in the Qilian Mountains and Its Response to Temperature from 1982 to 2014" Remote Sensing 13, no. 2: 286. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13020286

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