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Wasp Venom Biochemical Components and Their Potential in Biological Applications and Nanotechnological Interventions

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Agricultural Research Centre, Department of Bee Research, Plant Protection Research Institute, Giza 12627, Egypt
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Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Kom 32512, Egypt
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School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
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Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Kom 32512, Egypt
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National Engineering Research Center of Seafood, School of Food Science and Technology, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034, China
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Alnahalaljwal Foundation Saudi Arabia, P.O. Box 617, Al Jumum 21926, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
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College of Food Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
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State Key Laboratory of Quality Control in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau, China
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Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514, Egypt
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Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Riyadh Elm University, Riyadh 11681, Saudi Arabia
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Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Al Ain 52150, United Arab Emirates
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Department of Plant Protection and Biomolecular Diagnosis, Arid Lands Cultivation Research Institute (ALCRI), City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications, New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria 21934, Egypt
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Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522, Egypt
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International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270, Pakistan
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Laboratory of Medicinal Plant Biotechnology, College of Pharmacy, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China
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General Zoology, Institute for Biology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 8, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
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Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527, Egypt
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Department of Molecular Biosciences, Stockholm University, the Wenner-Gren Institute, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
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International Research Center for Food Nutrition and Safety, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
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Division of Pharmacognosy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Biomedical Centre, P.O. Box 574, 751 23 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 February 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 8 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Discovery from Animal Venoms)
Wasps, members of the order Hymenoptera, are distributed in different parts of the world, including Brazil, Thailand, Japan, Korea, and Argentina. The lifestyles of the wasps are solitary and social. Social wasps use venom as a defensive measure to protect their colonies, whereas solitary wasps use their venom to capture prey. Chemically, wasp venom possesses a wide variety of enzymes, proteins, peptides, volatile compounds, and bioactive constituents, which include phospholipase A2, antigen 5, mastoparan, and decoralin. The bioactive constituents have anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the limited quantities of wasp venom and the scarcity of advanced strategies for the synthesis of wasp venom’s bioactive compounds remain a challenge facing the effective usage of wasp venom. Solid-phase peptide synthesis is currently used to prepare wasp venom peptides and their analogs such as mastoparan, anoplin, decoralin, polybia-CP, and polydim-I. The goal of the current review is to highlight the medicinal value of the wasp venom compounds, as well as limitations and possibilities. Wasp venom could be a potential and novel natural source to develop innovative pharmaceuticals and new agents for drug discovery. View Full-Text
Keywords: wasp’s venom; biomedical properties; bioactive compounds; nanotechnology applications; allergy wasp’s venom; biomedical properties; bioactive compounds; nanotechnology applications; allergy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abd El-Wahed, A.; Yosri, N.; Sakr, H.H.; Du, M.; Algethami, A.F.M.; Zhao, C.; Abdelazeem, A.H.; Tahir, H.E.; Masry, S.H.D.; Abdel-Daim, M.M.; Musharraf, S.G.; El-Garawani, I.; Kai, G.; Al Naggar, Y.; Khalifa, S.A.M.; El-Seedi, H.R. Wasp Venom Biochemical Components and Their Potential in Biological Applications and Nanotechnological Interventions. Toxins 2021, 13, 206. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13030206

AMA Style

Abd El-Wahed A, Yosri N, Sakr HH, Du M, Algethami AFM, Zhao C, Abdelazeem AH, Tahir HE, Masry SHD, Abdel-Daim MM, Musharraf SG, El-Garawani I, Kai G, Al Naggar Y, Khalifa SAM, El-Seedi HR. Wasp Venom Biochemical Components and Their Potential in Biological Applications and Nanotechnological Interventions. Toxins. 2021; 13(3):206. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13030206

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abd El-Wahed, Aida, Nermeen Yosri, Hanem H. Sakr, Ming Du, Ahmed F.M. Algethami, Chao Zhao, Ahmed H. Abdelazeem, Haroon E. Tahir, Saad H.D. Masry, Mohamed M. Abdel-Daim, Syed G. Musharraf, Islam El-Garawani, Guoyin Kai, Yahya Al Naggar, Shaden A.M. Khalifa, and Hesham R. El-Seedi 2021. "Wasp Venom Biochemical Components and Their Potential in Biological Applications and Nanotechnological Interventions" Toxins 13, no. 3: 206. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13030206

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