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Article

Understanding the Spatial Effects of Unaffordable Housing Using the Commuting Patterns of Workers in the New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure

Department of Property, The University of Auckland Business School, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Academic Editors: Wolfgang Kainz, Xiao-guang Zhou, Maria Antonia Brovelli and Hussein Abdulmuttalib
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(7), 457; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10070457
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 17 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 2 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Science and Spatial Analysis in Urban Studies)
Commuting behaviour has been intensively examined by geographers, urban planners, and transportation researchers, but little is known about how commuting behaviour is spatially linked with the job and housing markets in urban cities. New Zealand has been recognised as one of the countries having the most unaffordable housing over the past decade. A group of middle-class professionals called ‘key workers’, also known during the pandemic as ‘essential workers’, provide essential services for the community, but cannot afford to live near their workplaces due to a lack of affordable housing. As a result, these key workers incur significant sub-optimal commuting. Such job-housing imbalance has contributed to a so-called spatial mismatch problem. This study aims to visualise the excess commuting patterns of individual workers using the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) from Statistics New Zealand. The visualisation suggests that over the last demi-decade, housing unaffordability has partially distorted the commuting patterns of key workers in Auckland. More of the working population, in particular those key workers, are displaced to the outer rings of the city. While there is an overall reduction in excess commuting across three groups of workers, key workers remain the working population with a disproportionate long excess commute. View Full-Text
Keywords: job-housing imbalance; geo-visualisation; spatial analysis; excess commuting; Auckland; Integrated data infrastructure (IDI) job-housing imbalance; geo-visualisation; spatial analysis; excess commuting; Auckland; Integrated data infrastructure (IDI)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xiong, C.; Cheung, K.S.; Filippova, O. Understanding the Spatial Effects of Unaffordable Housing Using the Commuting Patterns of Workers in the New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 457. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10070457

AMA Style

Xiong C, Cheung KS, Filippova O. Understanding the Spatial Effects of Unaffordable Housing Using the Commuting Patterns of Workers in the New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(7):457. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10070457

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xiong, Chuyi, Ka S. Cheung, and Olga Filippova. 2021. "Understanding the Spatial Effects of Unaffordable Housing Using the Commuting Patterns of Workers in the New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 7: 457. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10070457

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