Next Article in Journal
How Just Culture and Personal Goals Moderate the Positive Relation between Commercial Pilots’ Safety Citizenship Behavior and Voluntary Incident Reporting
Previous Article in Journal
“Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances
Previous Article in Special Issue
Hazard Perception–Response: A Theoretical Framework to Explain Drivers’ Interactions with Roadway Hazards
Article

How Does Selective Reporting Distort Understanding of Workplace Injuries?

1
Savanna Energy, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
2
Safety Science Innovation Lab, HLSS, Griffith University, Macrossan Building N16, 170 Kessels Road, Nathan Campus, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Manikam Pillay, Karen Klockner, Gaël Morel and Raphael Grzebieta
Received: 19 February 2021 / Revised: 25 June 2021 / Accepted: 4 August 2021 / Published: 8 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methods and Instruments for Evaluating and Measuring Safety)
This study introduces and applies a new method for studying under-reporting of injuries. This method, “one-to-one injury matching”, involves locating and comparing individual incidents within company and insurer recording systems. Using this method gives a detailed measure of the difference in injuries recognised as “work-related” by the insurer, and injuries classified as “recordable” by the company. This includes differences in the volume of injuries, as well as in the nature of the injuries. Applying this method to an energy company shows that only 19% of injuries recognised by the insurer were recognised by the company as recordable incidents. The method also demonstrates where claiming behaviour and claims management have created systematic biases in the disposition of incidents. Such biases result in an inaccurate picture of the severity and nature of incidents, over-estimating strike injuries such as to the hand, and underestimating chronic and exertion injuries such as to the back. View Full-Text
Keywords: injury reporting; under-reporting; recordable injuries; incident classification; risk assessment injury reporting; under-reporting; recordable injuries; incident classification; risk assessment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Geddert, K.; Dekker, S.; Rae, A. How Does Selective Reporting Distort Understanding of Workplace Injuries? Safety 2021, 7, 58. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030058

AMA Style

Geddert K, Dekker S, Rae A. How Does Selective Reporting Distort Understanding of Workplace Injuries? Safety. 2021; 7(3):58. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030058

Chicago/Turabian Style

Geddert, Kevin, Sidney Dekker, and Andrew Rae. 2021. "How Does Selective Reporting Distort Understanding of Workplace Injuries?" Safety 7, no. 3: 58. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030058

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop