Special Issue "Plant Specialized Metabolism: From Genetics to Phenotype"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tomas Laursen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dynamic Metabolons Research Group, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: specialized metabolism; metabolic channeling; dynamic metabolons; flavonoids; cyanogenic glucosides
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Bruna Marques dos Santos
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Center for Synthetic Biology, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: specialized metabolism; ecophysiology; proteomics; metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant specialized metabolism has gained increasing interest due to the impressive chemical diversity that has evolved as a consequence of the adaptation to environmental challenges. This chemical diversity has enabled plants to combat a broad range of pests, protect their cells against UV radiation, attract specialized pollinators, and make contact with symbiotic microorganisms. However, in order to fully appreciate this chemical landscape and their biological functions, we need to expand our understanding of how their biosynthesis is regulated at multiple levels. Within recent years, omics technologies has become available and affordable, which has prompted coherent studies combining genetics, metabolite, proteome, and phenotype data. Correlation analysis of such studies provide invaluable links from gene to function. This Special Issue will present recent advances on different omics analysis focusing on plant specialized metabolism with a key focus on translation of genetic information to phenotypic traits.

We welcome original research and reviews related to plant specialized metabolism, including the following topics:

The focus will be on:

  • Advances in omics technologies applied to study plant specialized metabolism
  • Genetic control of specialized metabolism
  • Plasticity of plant specialized metabolism
  • Biosynthesis of specialized metabolites
  • The ecophysiological role of specialized metabolites
  • Increasing the chemical diversity: new specialized metabolites and their properties
  • Biotechnology: specialized metabolism engineering in heterologous hosts

Dr. Tomas Laursen
Dr. Bruna Marques dos Santos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • specialized metabolism
  • plants
  • genetics
  • metabolites
  • proteomes
  • phenotypes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Characterization of the Role of the Neoxanthin Synthase Gene BoaNXS in Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chinese Kale
Genes 2021, 12(8), 1122; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12081122 - 24 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra) is rich in carotenoids, and neoxanthin is one of the most important carotenoids in Chinese kale. In this study, the function of the neoxanthin synthase gene (BoaNXS) in Chinese kale was investigated. BoaNXS [...] Read more.
Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra) is rich in carotenoids, and neoxanthin is one of the most important carotenoids in Chinese kale. In this study, the function of the neoxanthin synthase gene (BoaNXS) in Chinese kale was investigated. BoaNXS, which had a 699-bp coding sequence, was cloned from the white flower cultivar of Chinese kale and was expressed in all developmental stages and organs of Chinese kale; its expression was highest in young seeds. The subcellular localization indicated that BoaNXS was localized in the chloroplast. BoaNXS-overexpressed plants were obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression methodology, and the gene overexpression efficiencies ranged from 2.10- to 4.24-fold. The color in the leaves of BoaNXS-overexpressed plants changed from green to yellow-green; the content of total and individual carotenoids, such as neoxanthin, violaxanthin, and lutein, was significantly increased, and the expression levels of most carotenoid biosynthetic genes were notably increased. These findings indicated that BoaNXS is of vital importance in carotenoid biosynthesis in Chinese kale and could be used as a candidate gene for enriching the carotenoid accumulation and color of Chinese kale and other Brassica vegetables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Specialized Metabolism: From Genetics to Phenotype)
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Article
In Vitro Antiplatelet Activity of Mulberroside C through the Up-Regulation of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways and Down-Regulation of Phosphoproteins
Genes 2021, 12(7), 1024; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12071024 - 30 Jun 2021
Viewed by 477
Abstract
Physiological agonists trigger signaling cascades, called “inside-out signaling”, and activated platelets facilitate adhesion, shape change, granule release, and structural change of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3). Activated αIIb/β3 interacts with fibrinogen and begins second signaling cascades called “outside-in signaling”. These two signaling pathways can lead [...] Read more.
Physiological agonists trigger signaling cascades, called “inside-out signaling”, and activated platelets facilitate adhesion, shape change, granule release, and structural change of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3). Activated αIIb/β3 interacts with fibrinogen and begins second signaling cascades called “outside-in signaling”. These two signaling pathways can lead to hemostasis or thrombosis. Thrombosis can occur in arterial and venous blood vessels and is a major medical problem. Platelet-mediated thrombosis is a major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, controlling platelet activity is important for platelet-mediated thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. In this study, focus on Morus Alba Linn, a popular medicinal plant, to inhibit the function of platelets and found the containing component mulberroside C. We examine the effect of mulberroside C on the regulation of phosphoproteins, platelet-activating factors, and binding molecules. Agonist-induced human platelet aggregation is dose-dependently inhibited by mulberroside C without cytotoxicity, and it decreased Ca2+ mobilization and p-selectin expression through the upregulation of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor I (Ser1756), and downregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, mulberroside C inhibited thromboxane A2 production, fibrinogen binding, and clot retraction. Our results show antiplatelet effects and antithrombus formation of mulberroside C in human platelets. Thus, we confirm that mulberroside C could be a potential phytochemical for the prevention of thrombosis-mediated CVDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Specialized Metabolism: From Genetics to Phenotype)
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