Special Issue "Neurobiological Correlates of Psychometric and Biometric Tools in Human Health and Disease"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mario Miccoli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, 56121 Pisa, Italy
Interests: biostatistics; biometrics; epidemiology and public health
Prof. Dr. Andrea Poli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, 56121 Pisa, Italy
Interests: clinical psychology; biostatistics; biometrics; neurobiology of fear-related memories; mindfulness; self-compassion; non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation techniques; gut-brain axis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In many research areas psychometric tools are widely used to assess human behavioral, emotional and cognitive domains in both health and disease conditions. Though informative, psychometric scores are not able to capture the underlying physiological and neurobiological mechanisms that may elucidate the full framework of brain-mind relationship. Combining the psychometric, neurobiological and biostatistical approaches may contribute to clarify the brain-mind interactions and to develop a unitary view on such complex relationships. However, a paucity of research aims at directly correlating psychometric scores with physiological or neurobiological data. Promoting the combination of these approaches may benefit future psychobiological and biostatistical research.

We welcome contributions focusing on psychometric tools associated with the different neuroscientific levels of investigation (e.g. genetic/epigenetic, neural, behavioral, psychophysiological) in health and disease. Potential contributions may:

  1. Investigate and discuss the relationships between psychometric scores and neurobiological data in clinical or non-clinical samples;
  2. Validate and discuss, in clinical or non-clinical populations, new biologically-informed psychometric tools that are strongly rooted in a neuroscientific background.

We invite you to contribute to this Special Issue with a research paper, systematic review, meta-analysis, methodological paper, brief report, mini-review, or editorial addressing one or more of these topics.

Prof. Mario Miccoli
Prof. Dr. Andrea Poli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • psychometric tools
  • biometrics
  • assessment
  • neurobiology
  • biostatistics
  • emotion
  • cognition

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Item Reduction, Psychometric and Biometric Properties of the Italian Version of the Body Perception Questionnaire—Short Form (BPQ-SF): The BPQ-22
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3835; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073835 - 06 Apr 2021
Viewed by 771
Abstract
Body awareness disorders and reactivity are mentioned across a range of clinical problems. Constitutional differences in the control of the bodily state are thought to generate a vulnerability to psychological symptoms. Autonomic nervous system dysfunctions have been associated with anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic [...] Read more.
Body awareness disorders and reactivity are mentioned across a range of clinical problems. Constitutional differences in the control of the bodily state are thought to generate a vulnerability to psychological symptoms. Autonomic nervous system dysfunctions have been associated with anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. Though interoception may be a transdiagnostic mechanism promoting the improvement of clinical symptomatology, few psychometrically sound, symptom-independent, self-report measures, informed by brain–body circuits, are available for research and clinical use. We validated the Italian version of the body perception questionnaire (BPQ)—short form and found that response categories could be collapsed from five to three and that the questionnaire retained a three-factor structure with items reduced from 46 to 22 (BPQ-22). The first factor was loaded by body awareness items; the second factor comprised some items from the body awareness scale and some from the subdiaphragmatic reactivity scale (but all related to bloating and digestive issues), and the third factor by supradiaphragmatic reactivity items. The BPQ-22 had sound psychometric properties, good convergent and discriminant validity and test–retest reliability and could be used in clinical and research settings in which the body perception assessment is of interest. Psychometric findings in light of the polyvagal theory are discussed. Full article
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