Special Issue "New Techniques, Technologies and Materials for Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Edoardo Staderini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Postgraduate School of Orthodontics, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; clear aligners; interceptive orthodontic treatment; 3D imaging; cleft lip and palate
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aimed to explore the use of innovative approaches in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery.

Medicine has been changed by the introduction of materials, CAD-CAM technologies, paving the way for new diagnostic and treatment options.

Nowadays, scientific research is oriented towards improved efficiency and efficacy in patient’s care; if we search the keyword “digital dentistry” in Medline, we found that the number of articles has an exponential growth in the last two decades. Maxillo-facial surgery has introduced new procedures (surgery-first, virtual planning) and materials (PEEK, custom-made splints for orthognathic surgery). Moreover, the use of three-dimensional examinations (cone-beam computed tomography, stereophotogrammetry) is a key point for the esthetic assessment and evaluation of orthodontic therapies/corrective surgeries.

We need to explore new technologies, as well to validate each protocol for best use of health-care resources to produce a maximum benefit/risk ratio for all patients. This Special Issue is focused on the methodological quality of innovative approaches in order to push research towards a straight methodology; the background should give a critical appraisal of the clinical relevance of an innovative technique (as compared with conventional know-how) and specify primary and secondary outcomes. Materials and methods should compare the accuracy, reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of a new approach with a control group. Discussion should involve the generalization of the results in the context of the available literature, and address the strengths and limitations of the proposed method; a paragraph should include some key points point for the implementation of the use of new techniques in the diagnostic workflow and the assessment of treatment outcomes.

We would highlight four counterpoints that can interfere with patient-centered care:  timesaving, productivity, business; and 4p (predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory) medicines that encompass practical guidelines to optimize healthcare.

This Special Issue welcomes proof of concepts, and clinical papers that examine the effectiveness of innovative technologies in the diagnostic and therapeutic workflow. We aim to receive and publish systematic and narrative reviews, randomized controlled trials, prospective and retrospective studies, as well as case reports that accord to the EQUATOR guidelines. The main topics for the Special Issue are presented below:

  • Dental radiology: Cone-beam computed tomography, ALARA principles, and ionizing radiation exposure;
  • Three-dimensional imaging: accuracy and reliability of integration of digital data, precision of intraoral scanners and digital models, stereophotogrammetry, virtual/digital setup, and esthetic assessment;
  • Orthodontics: clear aligners, custom-made orthodontic appliances, tooth movement, and growth and development;
  • Maxillofacial surgery: cleft lip and palate, facial asymmetries, surgery-first vs, conventional orthognathic surgery, and guided-surgery.

Dr. Edoardo Staderini
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Cone-beam computed tomography
  • Radiation, ionizing
  • Imaging, three-dimensional
  • Orthodontics
  • Maxillofacial surgery
  • Treatment outcome
  • Technology, dental
  • radiometry
  • Relative biological effectiveness
  • Risk assessment
  • Software
  • Esthetic assessment
  • Medicine, personalized.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Craniofacial Morphology on Pharyngeal Airway Volume Measured Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)—A Retrospective Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 5040; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18095040 - 10 May 2021
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Abstract
Background: The present study aimed to determine the correlation between pharyngeal airway volume and craniofacial morphology through cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Additionally, the study analyzed the influence of gender on pharyngeal airway volume. (2) Methods: 80 CBCT scans of 40 male and 40 [...] Read more.
Background: The present study aimed to determine the correlation between pharyngeal airway volume and craniofacial morphology through cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Additionally, the study analyzed the influence of gender on pharyngeal airway volume. (2) Methods: 80 CBCT scans of 40 male and 40 female patients (mean age: 15.38 + 1.10 years) fulfilling the eligibility criteria were included. CBCT scans were evaluated for pharyngeal airway volume using the In Vivo Dental 5.1 software. Additionally, CBCT-derived lateral cephalograms were used to assess various craniofacial morphology parameters. To examine the influences of gender on airway volume, T-test was carried out. Correlation between airway volume and craniofacial parameters were measured using Pearson correlation followed by regression analysis. The value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean airway volume was significantly greater in males than in females. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between maxillary plane inclination and pharyngeal airway volume. In contrast, a positive correlation was observed between mandibular length and lower molar inclination with oropharyngeal and total pharyngeal airway volume. Females showed a statistically significant positive correlation between the pharyngeal airway volume and sagittal position of maxilla and mandible; they also showed a negative correlation between oropharyngeal airway volume and the mandibular plane angle. Conclusions: Overall, the pharyngeal airway space differs significantly between males and females. Craniofacial morphology does have a significant effect on the pharyngeal airway, especially on the oropharyngeal airway volume. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Antimicrobial Efficacy of Fruit Peels Eco-Enzyme against Enterococcus faecalis: An In Vitro Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5107; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145107 - 15 Jul 2020
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Abstract
Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), an effective endodontic irrigant against Enterococcus faecalis (EF), is harmful to periapical tissues. Natural pineapple-orange eco-enzymes (M-EE) and papaya eco-enzyme (P-EE) could be potential alternatives. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of M-EE and P-EE at different concentrations [...] Read more.
Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), an effective endodontic irrigant against Enterococcus faecalis (EF), is harmful to periapical tissues. Natural pineapple-orange eco-enzymes (M-EE) and papaya eco-enzyme (P-EE) could be potential alternatives. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of M-EE and P-EE at different concentrations and fermentation periods against EF, compared to 2.5% NaOCl. Fermented M-EE and P-EE (3 and 6 months) at various concentrations were mixed with EF in a 96-well plate incubated for 24 h anaerobically. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of M-EE and P-EE were determined via EF growth observation. EF inhibition was quantitatively measured and compared between different irrigants using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and different fermentation periods using the independent-samples T-test. M-EE and P-EE showed MIC at 50% and MBC at 100% concentrations. There was no significant difference in antimicrobial effect when comparing M-EE and P-EE at 50% and 100% to 2.5% NaOCl. P-EE at 6 months fermentation exhibited higher EF inhibition compared to 3 months at concentrations of 25% (p = 0.017) and 0.78% (p = 0.009). The antimicrobial properties of M-EE and P-EE, at both 100% and 50% concentrations, are comparable to 2.5% NaOCl. They could therefore be potential alternative endodontic irrigants, but further studies are required. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report
An Orthodontic Approach for Garre’s Sclerosing Osteomyelitis of the Mandible
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3159; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063159 - 18 Mar 2021
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Abstract
The nonsuppurative osteomyelitis of the mandible is a rare condition that can occur in children due to low-grade inflammatory processes, dental cavities, periodontal lesions as well as the eruption process of the teeth. We submit a case report involving the orthodontic management of [...] Read more.
The nonsuppurative osteomyelitis of the mandible is a rare condition that can occur in children due to low-grade inflammatory processes, dental cavities, periodontal lesions as well as the eruption process of the teeth. We submit a case report involving the orthodontic management of a 9-year-old female patient who presented in our service in the mixed dentition period with diagnosed Garre’s sclerosing osteomyelitis of the entire mandibular body. After a full work-up, the following symptoms and signs were noted: bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, loss of the leeway space, anterior open bite, distalization of the secondary maxillary right canine, nail biting and tongue thrust. Our orthodontic objectives were to relieve the TMJ pain, limit the eruption process of the teeth and to diminish the evolution of the osteomyelitis, reduce the growth of the inferior lower third of the face and to prevent further invasive treatment of the patient. In the first phase of treatment, we established a centric relationship using an orthopedic appliance (occlusal splint) and physiotherapy to deprogram the muscles and the TMJ. Throughout the second phase of treatment, we used orthopedic appliances to inhibit the overeruption of the secondary molars. After another year of treatment, the osteomyelitis lesions were under control with the permanent teeth in final position, good facial esthetic and as a functional result, no root resorption. We can conclude that by using low physiological forces to direct and control the growth pattern, good results could be obtained in stabilizing and controlling the sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible. Full article
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