Special Issue "The Prescription of Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Brett Gordon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Holsworth Research Initiative, La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University, Bendigo 3550, Australia
Interests: exercise; exercise dosing; cardiometabolic health; resistance training

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exercise is medicine, and a critical component of the prevention and treatment of cardiometabolic diseases. However, cardiovascular conditions continue to affect large proportions of the global population, and prescription of the medicine known as exercise is far from being optimised. Within the changing physical environment and economic landscape, it is more important than ever to improve the cardiovascular health of communities and reduce the individual and societal cost of cardiometabolic diseases.

This Special Issue focuses on how exercise is associated with and can be used and prescribed to improve cardiovascular health. The minimum clinically effective dose of exercise is an important topic for exploration to discover more knowledge around typical components of exercise such as frequency, intensity, time, and type, but also how these components, individually and as a whole, interact with other interventions.

To further understand how exercise can be prescribed to improve cardiovascular health, we invite all researchers within the broad fields of exercise physiology and health to submit original manuscripts in the form of systematic reviews, meta-analysis, observational trials, randomised controlled trials, clinical trials, or health economy analyses for consideration.

Dr. Brett Gordon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Health
  • Cardiac
  • Metabolic
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Artery
  • Blood pressure
  • Obesity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation on the Muscle Function of Children with Congenital Heart Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5870; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115870 - 30 May 2021
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Abstract
Critical medical and surgical advances have led to a shift in the care and management of children with congenital heart disease (CHD). These patients present with muscle deconditioning, which negatively influences their response to exercise, functional capacities, and quality of life. This study [...] Read more.
Critical medical and surgical advances have led to a shift in the care and management of children with congenital heart disease (CHD). These patients present with muscle deconditioning, which negatively influences their response to exercise, functional capacities, and quality of life. This study evaluates the influence of a cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program (CPRP) on the function of peripheral musculature of children with CHD. A single-center prospective cohort study was designed. Fifteen CHD subjects, between 12 and 16 years of age, with reduced aerobic capacity on a cardiopulmonary exercise test, were included in a three-month, 24-session CPRP. Measurements of the subjects’ handgrip strength, biceps brachii and quadriceps femoris strength, and triceps surae fatigue process were collected at the beginning of the program, after completion, and six months after the end of the intervention. A substantial and statistically significant improvement was observed in the subjects’ handgrip strength (kg) (p < 0.001), biceps brachii and quadriceps femoris strength (N) (p < 0.001), as well as triceps surae fatigue process (repetitions) (p = 0.018), with a maintenance of the results six months after the intervention. These results suggest that a CPRP could potentially improve the peripheral muscle function of children with CHD. Additional research is needed to confirm and expand on this hypothesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prescription of Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Health)
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Article
Evaluating Exercise Progression in an Australian Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Should Cardiac Intervention, Age, or Physical Capacity Be Considered?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5826; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115826 - 28 May 2021
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Abstract
Progression of prescribed exercise is important to facilitate attainment of optimal physical capacity during cardiac rehabilitation. However, it is not clear how often exercise is progressed or to what extent. This study evaluated whether exercise progression during clinical cardiac rehabilitation was different between [...] Read more.
Progression of prescribed exercise is important to facilitate attainment of optimal physical capacity during cardiac rehabilitation. However, it is not clear how often exercise is progressed or to what extent. This study evaluated whether exercise progression during clinical cardiac rehabilitation was different between cardiovascular treatment, age, or initial physical capacity. The prescribed exercise of sixty patients who completed 12 sessions of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation at a major Australian metropolitan hospital was evaluated. The prescribed aerobic exercise dose was progressed using intensity rather than duration, while repetitions and weight lifted were utilised to progress resistance training dose. Cardiovascular treatment or age did not influence exercise progression, while initial physical capacity and strength did. Aerobic exercise intensity relative to initial physical capacity was progressed from the first session to the last session for those with high (from mean (95%CI) 44.6% (42.2–47.0) to 68.3% (63.5–73.1); p < 0.001) and moderate physical capacity at admission (from 53.0% (50.7–55.3) to 76.3% (71.2–81.4); p < 0.001), but not in those with low physical capacity (from 67.3% (63.7–70.9) to 85.0% (73.7–96.2); p = 0.336). The initial prescription for those with low physical capacity was proportionately higher than for those with high capacity (p < 0.001). Exercise testing should be recommended in guidelines to facilitate appropriate exercise prescription and progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prescription of Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Health)
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Article
A Comparison of the Gluco-Regulatory Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Resistance Exercise
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 287; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010287 - 02 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1337
Abstract
High-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise both effectively lower blood glucose; however, it is not clear whether different regulatory mechanisms exist. This randomised cross-over study compared the acute gluco-regulatory and the physiological responses of high-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise. Sixteen (eight males [...] Read more.
High-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise both effectively lower blood glucose; however, it is not clear whether different regulatory mechanisms exist. This randomised cross-over study compared the acute gluco-regulatory and the physiological responses of high-intensity interval exercise and resistance exercise. Sixteen (eight males and eight females) recreationally active individuals, aged (mean ± SD) 22 ± 7 years, participated with a seven-day period between interventions. The high-intensity interval exercise trial consisted of twelve, 30 s cycling intervals at 80% of peak power capacity and 90 s active recovery. The resistance exercise trial consisted of four sets of 10 repetitions for three lower-limb exercises at 80% 1-RM, matched for duration of high-intensity interval exercise. Exercise was performed after an overnight fast, with blood samples collected every 30 min, for two hours after exercise. There was a significant interaction between time and intervention for glucose (p = 0.02), which was, on average (mean ± SD), 0.7 ± 0.7 mmol∙L−1 higher following high-intensity interval exercise, as compared to resistance exercise. Cortisol concentration over time was affected by intervention (p = 0.03), with cortisol 70 ± 103 ng∙mL−1 higher (p = 0.015), on average, following high-intensity interval exercise. Resistance exercise did not induce the acute rise in glucose that was induced by high-intensity interval exercise and appears to be an appropriate alternative to positively regulate blood glucose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prescription of Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Health)
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