Special Issue "Kidney Disease: Advantages in Clinical, Social, and Environmental Aspects"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tomasz Porażko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medcine and Nephrology, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Opole, ul. Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole, Poland
Interests: glomerulonephritis; chronic kidneys disease; hypertension; diabetes; cardiovascular disease; renal replacenent therapy; epidemiology
Dr. Tomasz Gołębiowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Dr. Andrzej Konieczny
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Dr. Hanna Augustyniak – Bartosik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Dr. Magdalena Kuriata-Kordek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic kidney disease affects a significant number of the population worldwide, up to 15% according to different registries. It is mostly observed in older people; however, occurrence may also differ according to sex, ethnicity, social, economic and environmental factors. Aetiology of the disease is complex, divided to primary and secondary. The second type is strictly associated with global health issues as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cancer diseases, or infectious diseases. Moreover, many of patients are unaware that they are affected. Therefore, it is of vital importance to define risk groups and detect kidney disease quickly in order to prevent progression to irreversible stage 5.

Despite many initiatives and programs, health care systems are still ineffective as the global population of patients requiring different forms of life saving renal replacement therapy is growing fast. It is expected to reach 5 million individuals. The fact produces a significant impact on the socioeconomic situation of all nations as the aim is to provide equal and unlimited access to effective treatment. There is need for global cooperation to solve this problem.

The Special Issue was founded as a new platform to publish results of especially international and multidisciplinary research groups on different aspects of kidney disease populations.

Dr. Tomasz Porażko
Dr. Tomasz Gołębiowski
Dr. Andrzej Konieczny
Dr. Hanna Augustyniak – Bartosik
Dr. Magdalena Kuriata-Kordek
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • glomerulonephritis
  • chronic kidneys disease
  • hypertension
  • diabetes
  • cardiovascular disease
  • renal replacement therapy
  • nephroocology
  • nephrolithiasis
  • epidemiology
  • social
  • economic and environmental impact

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Suffering of Advanced Chronic Renal Patients and Their Relationship with Symptoms in Loja, Ecuador
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105284 - 16 May 2021
Viewed by 856
Abstract
Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (ACKD) supposes a public health problem in Ecuador that requires a comprehensive approach. In view of the scarcity of studies on the subject in this country, the objective of this research was to determine the signs and symptoms associated [...] Read more.
Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (ACKD) supposes a public health problem in Ecuador that requires a comprehensive approach. In view of the scarcity of studies on the subject in this country, the objective of this research was to determine the signs and symptoms associated with the patients’ physical, social and psychological spheres that allow properly developing palliative care. A longitudinal, prospective and observational study was conducted with ACKD patients. In order to assess the symptomatic burden and suffering of these patients, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System Revised: renal (ESAS-r) for renal patients and the Distress Thermometer (DT) were used. The sample consisted of a total of 246 patients. The most common symptoms that affect them, causing them suffering in their daily lives, are those related to well-being, difficulty falling asleep and itching. It is necessary that health professionals adapt care measures and help patients undergoing renal treatment, especially those who have suffered the disease for a longer period of time, in order to alleviate the patients’ suffering and therefore improve their daily lives. To such an end, a care plan could be designed that includes early palliative care. Full article
Article
Influence of Depression and Anxiety on Hemodialysis Patients: The Value of Multidisciplinary Care
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3544; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073544 - 29 Mar 2021
Viewed by 732
Abstract
Affective disorders promote poorer outcomes in hemodialysis patients. According to the presence or not of depression/anxiety in these patients, aims were to analyze differences in sociodemographic, clinical and/or psychological factors and to identify predictors. One hundred eighty-six hemodialysis patients were classified based on [...] Read more.
Affective disorders promote poorer outcomes in hemodialysis patients. According to the presence or not of depression/anxiety in these patients, aims were to analyze differences in sociodemographic, clinical and/or psychological factors and to identify predictors. One hundred eighty-six hemodialysis patients were classified based on their depression/anxiety status. Basal characteristics showed differences between groups where mainly male sex (Depression: OR 0.2; Anxiety: OR 0.3) albumin (Depression: OR 0.1; Anxiety: OR 0.2) and calcium levels (Depression: OR 0.5; Anxiety: OR 0.4), impaired quality of life (Depression: OR 1.4; Anxiety: OR 1.2) and psychological inflexibility (Depression: OR 1.3; Anxiety: OR 1.2) were associated (all p < 0.01) to these mental conditions. Multivariate models showed that worse quality of life (OR 1.3; p < 0.001) predicted depression while marital status (with a partner; OR 0.3; p = 0.025) and albumin levels (OR 0.1; p = 0.027) were protective factors. Depression represented a risk factor for anxiety (OR 1.2; p = 0.001), although calcium levels (OR 0.5; p = 0.039) would protect this state. Interestingly, psychological inflexibility predicted both disorders (Depression: OR 1.2, p < 0.001 and Anxiety: OR 1.1; p = 0.002). Results highlight the relevance of well-trained multidisciplinary hemodialysis units to control the influence of these factors on the presence of depression/anxiety, and thus, their impact on the patients’ outcomes. Full article
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