Special Issue "Nutrition and Dietary Behaviours in Sport Settings"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Adrienne Forsyth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dietetics, Nutrition and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia
Interests: sports nutrition; mental health; community-based interventions
Dr. Brooke Devlin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dietetics, Nutrition and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia
Interests: sports nutrition; body composition; exercise interventions; blood glucose regulation
Dr. Gina Trakman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dietetics, Nutrition and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia
Interests: nutrition knowledge; inflammatory bowel disease; sports nutrition; questionnaire development; dietary additives
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition is an important element of preparation for athletic performance and may also influence the health of active individuals. Athletes’ dietary intakes often do not meet sports nutrition recommendations for optimal performance. Likewise, dietary intakes of the general population are inconsistent with dietary guidelines and contribute to poor acute and chronic health.

Sport settings are also nutrition settings. Recreational athletes, professional athletes and spectators alike consume food and beverages at these venues. Food service systems vary, with bring-your-own, externally catered or internal volunteer or professionally run services. Dietary behaviours of athletes and spectators may be influenced by the physical environment within the sport setting or through interactions with others in the sport context. Further research is needed to better understand how interventions in sport settings can influence eating behaviours both within and outside of the sports context.

We welcome reviews, observational and intervention studies that explore the complex interactions between nutrition, health and sporting environments. 

Dr. Adrienne Forsyth
Dr. Brooke Devlin
Dr. Gina Trakman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food
  • nutrition
  • sport
  • health
  • behaviour
  • performance
  • environment
  • sports environment
  • sport setting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Healthy-Canteen Displays: A Tactic to Encourage Community Sport Canteens to Provide Healthier Food and Beverage Options
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10194; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910194 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 577
Abstract
(1) Background: Community sport settings present a range of conflicting health behaviours, including the tension between being physically active and consuming discretionary foods. Therefore, community sport settings are considered a promising location for health promotion. The aim of this project was to evaluate [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Community sport settings present a range of conflicting health behaviours, including the tension between being physically active and consuming discretionary foods. Therefore, community sport settings are considered a promising location for health promotion. The aim of this project was to evaluate perceptions, knowledge and the impact (e.g., barriers and outcomes) of a healthy-canteen (cafeteria) display, based on traffic light labeling (TLL), which was set up at an Australian Basketball Association Managers’ Convention and Trade Show. (2) Methods: We set up a healthy ‘canteen display and surveyed Basketball managers on their perceptions of the display before (Survey 1) and after (Survey 2) visiting the display. Three months later they were surveyed (Survey 3) on changes made to their community sport canteens. (3) Results: Eighty-eight, 76 and 22 participants completed Surveys 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Participants believed stocking healthy foods and beverages was important (mean 8.5/10). Food waste, lack of consumer interest and price were identified barriers to stocking healthy foods. After visiting the display, 75% were inspired to make changes and 50% were surprised by the differences between their perceptions of the healthfulness of foods and the TLL ratings. Post-convention, 41% and 70% made or had planned healthy changes to their community sport canteen. (4) Conclusions: A healthy-canteen display is a low-cost, easy-to-implement strategy that may be able to direct self-driven improvement in the healthfulness of foods stocked at community canteens and lead to improved nutritional intakes at these venues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Dietary Behaviours in Sport Settings)
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Article
A Qualitative Investigation of Factors Influencing the Dietary Intakes of Professional Australian Football Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4205; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084205 - 15 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1370
Abstract
(1) Background: Many professional Australian Football (AF) players do not meet recommended sports nutrition guidelines despite having access to nutrition advice. There are a range of factors that can influence players′ ability to meet their nutrition goals and awareness of the barriers players [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Many professional Australian Football (AF) players do not meet recommended sports nutrition guidelines despite having access to nutrition advice. There are a range of factors that can influence players′ ability to meet their nutrition goals and awareness of the barriers players face is essential to ensure that dietary advice translates into practice. Therefore, this qualitative research study aimed to explore the factors influencing AF players’ dietary intakes and food choice. (2) Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve professional male AF players. (3) Results: Less experienced players restricted their carbohydrate intake to meet body composition goals, particularly during preseason and surrounding body composition assessment. During the competition season players had a greater focus on performance and placed more emphasis on carbohydrate intake in the lead up to matches. Players felt nutrition goals were easier to achieve when dietary choices were supported by their families and peers. One-on-one consultations provided by a sports dietitian were players′ preferred mode of nutrition intervention. Individualized nutrition advice is required for less experienced AF players who may be vulnerable to unsustainable dietary habits. Experienced AF players can support junior teammates by promoting positive team culture related to body composition, nutrition and performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Dietary Behaviours in Sport Settings)
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