Special Issue "Nuts and Human Health"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rachel Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Siew Ling Tey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Interests: nuts; energy density; nutrition interventions; heart disease; diabetes; obesity; ageing; malnutrition; sarcopenia
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is planning a Special issue focusing on the effects of nuts on human health. Several international guidelines recommend the inclusion of nuts as part of a healthy diet to lower the risk of chronic diseases. Recent research has investigated the effects of regular nut consumption on several new research areas, such as cancer, diabetes, malnutrition, cognition, and fertility. The continued investigation of the health effects of nuts in different research areas can help to guide nut consumption recommendations.  

This Special Issue aims to bring together up-to-date original research in the field of the health effects of nut consumption. We welcome manuscripts on long-term, short-term, and acute human studies, as well as epidemiological research on a wide range of outcomes associated with nut consumption. We also invite submissions of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on nut consumption.

We invite you to submit your latest research on the health effects of nut consumption.

Prof. Dr. Rachel Brown
Dr. Siew Ling Tey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nuts
  • Chronic disease
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Human health
  • Energy balance
  • Satiety
  • Portion size
  • Energy density
  • Diet quality
  • Eating occasion
  • Novel biomarkers
  • Metabolomics
  • Phytochemicals
  • Ageing
  • Cognitive function
  • Nutritional status
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Is a Handful an Effective Way to Guide Nut Recommendations?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7812; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157812 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 190
Abstract
Dietary guidelines recommend consuming 30 g of nuts per day to reduce the risk of chronic disease. A ‘handful’ is commonly used to guide consumers. Research is lacking on how this translates into actual gram amounts. This study quantified the grams of nuts [...] Read more.
Dietary guidelines recommend consuming 30 g of nuts per day to reduce the risk of chronic disease. A ‘handful’ is commonly used to guide consumers. Research is lacking on how this translates into actual gram amounts. This study quantified the grams of nuts represented by different portion size measures, including a ‘handful’ and ‘30 g serving’ among 120 participants. Each participant was randomised to a sequence where they received three of six different nut types (from almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, peanuts, and walnuts) and were instructed to take a: ‘usual serving’, ‘handful’, ‘small handful’, ‘large handful’, and ‘30 g serving’ of each. Combining all nut types, the median ‘handful’ was 36.3 g, compared to 28.7 g for the estimated ‘30 g serving’ and 24.8 for the ‘usual serving’. The ‘large handful’ was approximately double the ‘handful’ (61.3 g), whereas the ‘small handful’ was about half (16.7 g). Eighty-three percent of portions chosen were at least 80% of the recommended 30 g intake when participants were asked to take a ‘handful’, compared to 63% for the ‘30 g serving’. It appears a ‘handful’ can be used as a practical tool to guide recommended nut intakes, and increases the amount selected compared to instructions to take a ‘30 g serving’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts and Human Health)
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Review

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Review
Nuts and Older Adults’ Health: A Narrative Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1848; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041848 - 14 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1195
Abstract
Although the beneficial effects of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases have been well established, little is known about the effects of nuts on age-related diseases. Given that age-related diseases share many biological pathways with cardiometabolic diseases, it is plausible that diets rich in nuts [...] Read more.
Although the beneficial effects of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases have been well established, little is known about the effects of nuts on age-related diseases. Given that age-related diseases share many biological pathways with cardiometabolic diseases, it is plausible that diets rich in nuts might be beneficial in ameliorating age-related conditions. The objective of this review was to summarise the findings from studies that have examined the associations or effects of nut consumption, either alone or as part of the dietary pattern, on three major age-related factors—telomere length, sarcopenia, and cognitive function—in older adults. Overall, the currently available evidence suggests that nut consumption, particularly when consumed as part of a healthy diet or over a prolonged period, is associated with positive outcomes such as longer telomere length, reduced risk of sarcopenia, and better cognition in older adults. Future studies that are interventional, long-term, and adequately powered are required to draw definitive conclusions on the effects of nut consumption on age-related diseases, in order to inform dietary recommendations to incorporate nuts into the habitual diet of older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts and Human Health)
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Review
The Effect of Nut Consumption on Diet Quality, Cardiometabolic and Gastrointestinal Health in Children: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 454; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020454 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1040
Abstract
Tree nuts and ground nuts are nutrient-rich foods known to improve human health when consumed regularly in the diet. Past observational studies suggest that nuts improve adult and child health; however, limited randomized control trials (RCTs) have assessed the health effects of nuts [...] Read more.
Tree nuts and ground nuts are nutrient-rich foods known to improve human health when consumed regularly in the diet. Past observational studies suggest that nuts improve adult and child health; however, limited randomized control trials (RCTs) have assessed the health effects of nuts in children. Using a systematic review approach, we examined the effect of nut intake on health outcomes in children aged 8–18 years. We searched PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane library to identify RCTs of interest. A total of 5783 articles were identified, 4821 were screened by title and abstract and 37 by full text resulting in four articles that met the inclusion criteria for the review. Nut consumption was between 15 and 30 g with durations of between 3 and 16 weeks. Nut consumption was shown to improve children’s diet quality (increase children’s intake of essential nutrients including fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats), protein and fiber), there were inconsistent effects on biomarkers of cardiometabolic health (improve lipid profiles, microvascular reactivity and inflammation) and gastrointestinal health (increase in the proportion of beneficial fecal bacteria). Further studies exploring the broad health benefits of nuts in children are needed with consideration given to higher doses and longer intervention periods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts and Human Health)
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Review
Barriers and Facilitators to Nut Consumption: A Narrative Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9127; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17239127 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 775
Abstract
Habitual nut intake is associated with a range of health benefits; however, population consumption data suggests that most individuals do not meet current recommendations for nut intake. The literature has highlighted a range of barriers and facilitators to nut consumption, which should be [...] Read more.
Habitual nut intake is associated with a range of health benefits; however, population consumption data suggests that most individuals do not meet current recommendations for nut intake. The literature has highlighted a range of barriers and facilitators to nut consumption, which should be considered when designing strategies to promote nut intake. Common barriers include confusion regarding the effects of nut consumption on body weight, perceptions that nuts are high in fat, or too expensive, and challenges due to dentition issues or nut allergies. Conversely, demographic characteristics such as higher education and income level, and a healthier lifestyle overall, are associated with higher nut intakes. Health professionals appear to play an important role in promoting nut intake; however, research suggests that knowledge of the benefits of nut consumption could be improved in many health professions. Future strategies to increase nut intake to meet public health recommendations must clarify misconceptions of the specific benefits of nut consumption, specifically targeting sectors of the population known to have lower nut consumption, and educate health professionals to promote nut intake. In addition, given the relatively small body of evidence exploring barriers and facilitators to nut consumption, further research exploring these factors is justified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts and Human Health)
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