Special Issue "Research on Alcohol Culture and Health Behavior"

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Aeree Sohn
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Center for Addiction Science Specialties, Sahmyook University, Seoul, Korea
Interests: alcohol and culture; national alcohol policy; alcohol use; unwanted sexual behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue of this journal attempts to view and analyze drinking behavior from a social perspective. Health policies consistently hold that the exercise of sobriety is urgent because people in many countries drink too much alcohol, which, in turn, negatively affects their health in the long term. In other words, in the health care community, drinking alcohol is regarded only as a health risk, and therefore it is argued that it is necessary to stop drinking. Nevertheless, although the argument that soberness is necessary because of the health hazards of drinking is a logical conclusion, it is difficult to say that it is socially valid. It is well known that drinking a lot of alcohol is harmful to health, but people still drink a lot because the socio-cultural motives recommending alcohol are very strong.

Therefore, simply emphasizing the health risks of drinking will not help an alcohol-free policy succeed easily. However, in the health care field, there is a very passive understanding of social and cultural factors when considering policy. In this Special Issue, I would like to anticipate the creation of a more effective alcohol control policy by revealing the social and cultural characteristics of drinking beyond these academic boundaries.

This Special Issue intends to recruit articles on the following three aspects.

First, we examine the characteristics of drinking culture from a comparative socio-cultural perspective.

Second, this issue characterizes drinking behavior based on major demographic factors such as gender, generation, and occupation and identifies factors that cause excessive drinking. In particular, it seeks to find demographic groups in which heavy drinking is prominent and to understand their drinking behavior and social values and norms related to drinking. In other words, drinking behavior has social norms and values that rationalize it. For example, the belief that drinking is essential for maintaining social relationships or that drinking is comforting when we are stressed are factors that encourage drinking. A drinking prevention campaign can be carried out more effectively by informing people that these worldly beliefs are wrong, rather than by simply warning of the health risks of drinking. In other words, it may be more efficient to establish prevention strategies that focus on drinking motives or values, rather than on the alcoholic effects of alcohol consumption.

Third, the relationship between socioeconomic structure and drinking could be examined. One example is that the effect of sharing the news of a drinking party with friends on social media may be that it encourages others to host drinking parties, creating a competitive atmosphere around drinking.

While the focus will be on empirical articles, articles with an editorial style or those that propose methodological innovations will also be considered.

Prof. Dr. Aeree Sohn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • culture
  • motives
  • attitudes
  • alcohol marketing

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Double Mediating Effect of Social Isolation and Emotional Support on Feelings of Entrapment and Motivation for Recovery among Korean Alcoholic Inpatients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4710; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094710 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 466
Abstract
This study identified the relationship between feeling of entrapment and motivation for change among hospitalized alcoholic patients and examined the double mediating effect model of social isolation and emotional support on this relationship. The study participants were 101 male and female alcoholic patients [...] Read more.
This study identified the relationship between feeling of entrapment and motivation for change among hospitalized alcoholic patients and examined the double mediating effect model of social isolation and emotional support on this relationship. The study participants were 101 male and female alcoholic patients hospitalized at C hospital, which specializes in alcohol treatment at I city in Korea. PROCESS Macro 3.5 Model 6 was used for analyses of double mediating effects. The results revealed that entrapment and social isolation were negatively correlated with motivation for recovery of alcoholic inpatients, whereas emotional support was positively correlated with it. In a sequential double mediation model for motivation to change in alcoholic inpatients, the direct effects of social isolation and entrapment were not significant. However, the sequential indirect effect of social isolation and emotional support on entrapment and motivation for recovery among alcoholic inpatients was significant. These results suggest that making alcoholic inpatients not feel socially isolated by providing them with emotional support or through other means of assistance by practitioners or family members is important for their recovery from alcohol use disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Alcohol Culture and Health Behavior)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Functional-Belief-Based Alcohol Use Questionnaire (FBAQ) as a Pre-Screening Tool for High-Risk Drinking Behaviors among Young Adults: A Northern Thai Cross-Sectional Survey Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1536; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041536 - 05 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Background: an alcohol-use disorders identification test (AUDIT) is a standard screening tool for high-risk drinking behavior. Standard drink calculation is difficult to comprehend and may lead to inaccurate estimates. This study intended to develop a practical pre-screening tool for the identification of high-risk [...] Read more.
Background: an alcohol-use disorders identification test (AUDIT) is a standard screening tool for high-risk drinking behavior. Standard drink calculation is difficult to comprehend and may lead to inaccurate estimates. This study intended to develop a practical pre-screening tool for the identification of high-risk drinkers among young adults. Methods: a cross-sectional survey was conducted in Northern Thailand from July 2016 to December 2016. Data was collected on relevant characteristics and health beliefs about drinking. The 12-month AUDIT was used as the reference standard. Logistic regression was used for the score derivation. The discriminative ability was measured with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AuROC). Result: a total of 1401 young adults were included. Of these, 791 people (56.5%) were current drinkers. Three functional-belief items were identified as independent predictors of high-risk drinking and were used to develop the functional-belief-based alcohol-use questionnaire (FBAQ). The FBAQ demonstrated an acceptable discriminative ability—AuROC 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70, 0.77). Conclusion: The FBAQ contains only three simple belief questions and does not require unintelligible standard drink calculation. Implementing the FBAQ score and the AUDIT in a serial manner might be a more effective method in a mass-screening program for alcohol-use disorder in young adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Alcohol Culture and Health Behavior)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Are the Drinking Norms, Expectancies and Alcohol Use Different from in Gender and Age Groups among Korean?
Authors: Aeree Sohn
Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Sahmyook University

Title: Binge drinking and obesity-related eating: The moderating roles of eating broadcast viewing experience among Korean adults
Authors: Jiye Kim 1; Saegyeol Choi 1; Soontae An 2 and Hyekyeong Kim 3 *
Affiliation: 1. Department of Health Convergence, Graduate School of Ewha Womans University 2. Department of Communication and Media, Ewha Womans University 3. Department of Health Convergence, Ewha Womans University

Title: The influence of multidimensional deprivation on the problem drinking developmental trajectory among young people: A longitudinal study using a latent class growth analysis
Authors: Soo bi Lee and Sulki Chung
Affiliation: Chung-Ang University

Back to TopTop