Special Issue "Behavioural Change and Socioeconomic Disparity in Health during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Takahiro Tabuchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Osaka International Cancer Institute, Osaka 541-8567, Japan
Interests: health inequality; social determinants of health; tobacco control; health service research and public health
Prof. Dr. Naoki Kondo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Interests: social epidemiology; social determinants of health and aging
Dr. Kota Katanoda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Cancer Center, Division of Cancer Statistics Integration, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
Interests: cancer epidemiology; cancer statistics; tobacco control; simulation modellling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioural changes and socioeconomic disparity in health are a major public health issues, both during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 problem will influence various aspect of human life and population health, not only through infectious disease matters, but also socioeconomic and other matters. As a result, various types of behavioural changes and socioeconomic disparity in health can be observed. For example, because smoking has been determined as a risk factor for COVID-19, smokers may intend to quit smoking during and after the COVID-19 pandemic in order to protect their life and health.

This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge on behaviour change and socioeconomic disparity in health. New research papers, reviews, case reports, and conference papers are welcome to this Issue. Papers dealing with new approaches to observe behavioural changes or socioeconomic disparity in health are also welcome. Other manuscript types include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries.

Dr. Takahiro Tabuchi
Prof. Dr. Naoki Kondo
Dr. Kota Katanoda
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • Behavior change
  • Socioeconomic disparity in health
  • Health behavior
  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Physical health
  • Mental health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Increase in Social Isolation during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Its Association with Mental Health: Findings from the JACSIS 2020 Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8238; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168238 - 04 Aug 2021
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Abstract
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is assumed to have caused an increase in the number of socially isolated people. However, the prevalence of social isolation during the pandemic has not been well studied, particularly among Asian populations. This study investigated changes in [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is assumed to have caused an increase in the number of socially isolated people. However, the prevalence of social isolation during the pandemic has not been well studied, particularly among Asian populations. This study investigated changes in the prevalence of social isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and examined its association with mental health among the general Japanese population. Data were obtained from a large-scale, web-based nationwide survey conducted from August to September 2020 (n = 28,000; aged 15–79 years). Social isolation was defined as less frequent contact with people other than co-residing family members. We assessed the participants’ frequency of contact in January (before the pandemic) and August 2020 (during the pandemic). Mental health outcomes included psychological distress, suicidal ideation, loneliness, and fear of COVID-19. We analyzed the data of 25,482 respondents. The weighted prevalence (95% confidence interval) of social isolation was 21.2% (20.7–21.7%) and 27.9% (27.3–28.4%) before and during the pandemic, respectively. The prevalence of social isolation increased by 6.7 (6.3–7.0) percentage points during the pandemic. Older people and men had the greatest increase in the prevalence of social isolation. People who became socially isolated during the pandemic had greater loneliness and fear of COVID-19 than those who were consistently not socially isolated since before the pandemic. This study suggested that social isolation had increased during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. Our findings highlight the importance of developing immediate measures against social isolation to maintain good mental health. Full article
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