Special Issue "Current Status of Tobacco Control Policies"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zubair Kabir
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health, University College Cork, Room 4.20 Western Gateway Building, Cork T12 XF62, Ireland
Interests: tobacco control; non-communicable disease epidemiology (CVD epidemiologic policy modelling; lung health and cancer); burden of disease study; health literacy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Kenneth D. Ward
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA
Interests: tobacco use epidemiology and intervention; global tobacco control; waterpipe (hookah)
Dr. Christopher Seitz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health & Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, USA
Interests: tobacco control; e-cigarette use; photovoice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on the “Current status in tobacco control policies” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph

Tobacco kills 8 million people globally and 1 billion people will die of tobacco by the turn of this century. Worldwide, current tobacco control policies are in a state of flux across several nations and in vulnerable population settings. Many high-income nations in Europe and in North America have made significant progress in implementing the “best buys” of the WHO tobacco control MPOWER policies. However, there are high-, middle-, and low-income nations who have yet to implement the FCTC guidelines in their entirety. This Special Issue will aim to highlight populations and nations which are in different stages of tobacco control policies in light of FCTC guidelines. This Issue will also compile some “best practice” case studies that point to successful strategies on both the supply and demand sides of tobacco. Researchers involved in tobacco control policies currently in operation or being evaluated in specific population settings, such as prisons, mental hospitals, nursing homes, public housing, parks, beaches, and playgrounds are also encouraged to submit their work.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the current status of tobacco control policies across different population settings and nations. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Disclaimer: We will not accept research funded in part or full by any tobacco companies in this Special Issue. For more details, please check: https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/1660-4601/15/12/2831/htm.

Dr. Zubair Kabir
Prof. Dr. Kenneth D. Ward
Dr. Christopher Seitz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tobacco
  • FCTC
  • MPOWER
  • WHO
  • Vulnerable population
  • Smoke-free policies
  • Parks
  • Playgrounds
  • Prisons
  • Beaches
  • Mental hospitals
  • Nursing homes
  • Demand
  • Supply
  • Best practice

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Novel Insights into Young Adults’ Perceived Effectiveness of Waterpipe Tobacco-Specific Pictorial Health Warning Labels in Lebanon: Implications for Tobacco Control Policy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7189; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137189 - 05 Jul 2021
Viewed by 374
Abstract
This study aims to explore the perceived effectiveness of waterpipe (WP) tobacco specific health warning labels (HWLs) among young adult WP smokers and nonsmokers in Lebanon. Before participating in focus group discussions, participants (n = 66; WP smokers n = 30; nonsmokers [...] Read more.
This study aims to explore the perceived effectiveness of waterpipe (WP) tobacco specific health warning labels (HWLs) among young adult WP smokers and nonsmokers in Lebanon. Before participating in focus group discussions, participants (n = 66; WP smokers n = 30; nonsmokers n = 36; age 18–33) completed a brief survey to rate the effectiveness of 12 HWLs’ and rank them according to four risk themes (WP health effects, WP harm to others, WP-specific harm, and WP harm compared to cigarettes). Differences in HWLs ratings by WP smoking status were examined and the top-ranked HWL in each theme were identified. HWLs depicting mouth cancer and harm to babies were rated as the most effective by both WP smokers and non-smokers. WP smokers rated HWLs which depicted harm to children and infants as more effective than non-smokers. The top-ranked HWLs for perceived overall effectiveness were those depicting “oral cancer”, “harm to babies”, “orally transmitted diseases” and “mouth cancer”. HWLs depicting oral lesions and harm to babies were rated as most effective, while HWLs showing the harmful effects of WP secondhand smoke on infants and children were rated as less effective by nonsmokers compared to smokers. Our study provides evidence on the potential effectiveness of HWLs for further evaluation in Lebanon and the Eastern Mediterranean region. The results will inform and guide the development and implementation of tobacco control policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Status of Tobacco Control Policies)
Article
Adoption of Tobacco 21: A Cross-Case Analysis of Ten US States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6096; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116096 - 05 Jun 2021
Viewed by 562
Abstract
Despite the recent push for Tobacco 21 legislation in the US and the national adoption of Tobacco 21, there is a paucity of data on the process of policy adoption. To explore the key factors that served as facilitators or challenges to the [...] Read more.
Despite the recent push for Tobacco 21 legislation in the US and the national adoption of Tobacco 21, there is a paucity of data on the process of policy adoption. To explore the key factors that served as facilitators or challenges to the passage of state T21 laws that apply to the sale of all tobacco products to anyone under 21 years of age, we conducted a comparative, cross-case study in ten states that adopted Tobacco 21 between 2016 and 2019. Stakeholders from selected states were identified via snowball sampling, and interviews were conducted from November 2018 to March 2020. Three primary factors emerged as facilitators to the passage of state T21 laws: (1) increased attention on e-cigarettes as the product driving an overall increase in youth tobacco use and depiction of an “e-cigarette epidemic”, (2) having at least one influential policy entrepreneur or champion, and (3) traction from other states or local municipalities passing T21 legislation. Challenges to T21′s success included (1) influence of the tobacco industry, (2) the bill’s low ranking among legislative priorities, and (3) controversy among advocates and policymakers over bill language. As e-cigarette rates spiked, T21 bills became legislative priorities, traction from other successful efforts mounted, and ultimately, the tobacco industry flipped from opposing to supporting T21 laws. Despite these favorable headwinds, advocates struggled increasingly to pass bills with ideal policy language. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Status of Tobacco Control Policies)
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Article
The Utilization of National Tobacco Cessation Services among Female Smokers and the Need for a Gender-Responsive Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5313; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105313 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 634
Abstract
Despite the steadily increasing prevalence of female smoking, gender-responsive tobacco cessation services have not been widely provided worldwide. The purpose of this study is to identify factors associated with the use of tobacco cessation services among female tobacco product users in Korea from [...] Read more.
Despite the steadily increasing prevalence of female smoking, gender-responsive tobacco cessation services have not been widely provided worldwide. The purpose of this study is to identify factors associated with the use of tobacco cessation services among female tobacco product users in Korea from a national perspective. We performed a logistic regression analysis using data from 663 female smokers; 11.0% of female smokers had used government-supported smoking cessation services. A logistic regression model showed a statistically significant association between the utilization of smoking cessation services and a history of pregnancy and childbirth, depression, current use of heated tobacco products and multiple tobacco products, parental smoking status and receiving advice to quit. With regard to the motivation ruler, those in their 50s reported a higher importance than those in their 20s. Weight gain concerns when quitting smoking were the lowest among the participants aged 19–29. The need to develop gender-specific smoking cessation programs is the highest among the participants aged 39–49 and the lowest among those aged 19–29. This study suggests several factors related to the utilization of national health services among female smokers. Further studies considering gender-specific needs for the development of gender-responsive tobacco cessation support are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Status of Tobacco Control Policies)
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Article
The Association between Quitline Characteristics and Smoking Cessation by Educational Attainment, Income, Race/Ethnicity, and Sex
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3297; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063297 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 796
Abstract
Little research examines how tobacco quitlines affect disparities in smoking cessation in the United States. Our study utilized data from the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2018) (TUS-CPS) and state-level quitline data from the North American [...] Read more.
Little research examines how tobacco quitlines affect disparities in smoking cessation in the United States. Our study utilized data from the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2018) (TUS-CPS) and state-level quitline data from the North American Quitline Consortium and National Quitline Data Warehouse. We ran multilevel logistic regression models assessing a state-run quitline’s budget, reach, number of counseling sessions offered per caller, and hours of operation on 90-day smoking cessation. Multiplicative interactions between all exposures and sex, race/ethnicity, income, and education were tested to understand potential effect modification. We found no evidence that budget, reach, number of counseling sessions, or hours available for counseling were associated with cessation in the main effects analyses. However, when looking at effect modification by sex, we found that higher budgets were associated with greater cessation in males relative to females. Further, higher budgets and offering more sessions had a stronger association with cessation among individuals with lower education, while available counseling hours were more strongly associated with cessation among those with higher education. No quitline characteristics examined were associated with smoking cessation. We found evidence for effect modification by sex and education. Despite proven efficacy at the individual-level, current resource allocation to quitlines may not be sufficient to improve rates of cessation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Status of Tobacco Control Policies)
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