Special Issue "Dental Caries Risk Assessment and Management"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rahena Akhter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown 2006, Australia
Interests: caries risk assessment; caries management system; minimal intervention dentistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on dental caries risk assessment and management in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph. 

Dental caries is a complex, multifactorial disease. Caries risk indicators are variables that contribute to the disease’s development and progression. Therefore, caries risk assessment is essential in diagnosing these indicators related to a patient’s current disease. Caries risk assessment will help to predict future disease and thus enable evidence-based clinical decisions to minimise disease incidence and progression. Currently, caries-risk assessments used by dental practitioners are insufficient to quantitate a person’s caries disease susceptibility and allow for effective preventative measures. Risk assessment can individualize, select and help to determine a patient’s preventive and restorative treatment frequency, which enables practitioners to anticipate whether caries as a disease progresses or stabilizes. Research on caries risk assessment and management can offer a critical guide for healthcare providers. Assessing caries risk will provide a foundation for determining clinical decision making protocols regarding the provision of diagnostic, dietary, and fluoride treatments with the aim of disease prevention as preferential to more invasive restorative procedures.

This Special Issue is open to caries risk assessment and prevention to assist clinicians with decisions regarding prevention and treatment based upon caries risk assessments. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Rahena Akhter
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Caries risk indicators
  • Caries risk assessment tools
  • Caries diagnosis
  • Caries progression or stabilization
  • Control and prevention of dental caries
  • Caries clinical protocols
  • Management of the incipient/cavitated lesions
  • Caries Management System (CMS)
  • Diet modification, fluoride therapy and occlusal sealants

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Observational Study Regarding the Relationship between Nutritional Status, Dental Caries, Mutans Streptococci, and Lactobacillus Bacterial Colonies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3551; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073551 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 700
Abstract
The prevalence of dental caries and obesity is high as both raise significant health problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between dental caries, the number of salivary colonies forming units of Mutans Streptococci (MS) and Lactobacillus (LB), and [...] Read more.
The prevalence of dental caries and obesity is high as both raise significant health problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between dental caries, the number of salivary colonies forming units of Mutans Streptococci (MS) and Lactobacillus (LB), and the nutritional status in a group of children from Transylvania. This observational study used a sample of 154 school children, aged 9 to 12 years. The prevalence of caries was measured using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index for deciduous teeth (dmft index) and for permanent teeth (DMFT index). Height and weight were assessed for each subject, and their body mass index (BMI) percentile was calculated. Salivary levels of Mutans Streptococci (MS) and Lactobacillus (LB) were determined using the CRT Bacteria Test from Ivoclar Vivadent. In our study, we found a positive association between the BMI percentile, MS count, LB count, tooth brushing frequency, and the incidence of dental caries in children aged 9 to 12 years old. Future preventive programs should include nutrition control in order to prevent both the apparition of dental caries and obesity in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Caries Risk Assessment and Management)
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Article
The Association of Caries Increment Dynamics in Preschool Children with Risk Factors: The 3-Year Prospective Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7459; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17207459 - 13 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 698
Abstract
This prospective study monitored the dental status, the presence of plaque, and cariogenic microorganism levels of identical children over three years. The aim was to determine the dynamics of caries increment as well as the relationship between risk factors and caries prevalence. A [...] Read more.
This prospective study monitored the dental status, the presence of plaque, and cariogenic microorganism levels of identical children over three years. The aim was to determine the dynamics of caries increment as well as the relationship between risk factors and caries prevalence. A total number of 125 children (72 boys and 53 girls) was included in the study, with an average age of 3.95 ± 0.06 years at the baseline. During the clinical examination at the nursery schools, the presence of dental plaque was recorded, and saliva samples were collected from the tongue of children for the DentoCult SM test providing easy detection of mutans streptococci from saliva samples. At baseline, 65.6% of the children had no caries, 4% had restored teeth with fillings or crowns or missing teeth due to caries, and 30.4% had at least one untreated caries. The percentages of intact teeth, restored or missing teeth, and untreated caries were 52.8%, 8.8%, 38.4% in the second year and 49.1%, 13.8%, and 31.1% in the third year. The dmft index value was 1.41 ± 0.24 in the first year, 2.29 ± 0.30 in the second year, and 2.33 ± 0.31 in the third year. There was a significant correlation between plaque presence and dt and dmft values (p < 0.05; the statistical analyses were performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test). This 3-year longitudinal study highlighted the importance of examining both the oral hygiene and the level of cariogenic microorganisms when undertaking the evaluation of caries risk evaluation in preschool children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Caries Risk Assessment and Management)
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Article
Effect of Polyols and Selected Dental Materials on the Ability to Create a Cariogenic Biofilm–On Children Caries-Associated Streptococcus Mutans Isolates
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3720; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103720 - 25 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1010
Abstract
Secondary caries is a disease associated with the formation of biofilm on the border of the tooth and dental filling. Its development is strongly influenced by the dietary sweet foods and the type of dental material. The aim of the study was to [...] Read more.
Secondary caries is a disease associated with the formation of biofilm on the border of the tooth and dental filling. Its development is strongly influenced by the dietary sweet foods and the type of dental material. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of sweeteners on the ability of clinical Streptococcus mutans strains to form biofilm on dental materials. Strains were isolated from plaque samples from 40 pediatric patients from the 3–6 ICADS II group. The ability to form biofilm was tested on composite and glass ionomer dental materials used for milk teeth filling in the presence of sucrose, xylitol, sorbitol, and erythritol. The bacterial film mass after 12, 24, 48, and 72 h and the number of bacterial colonies significantly decreased (p < 0.01) compared to the initial value for 5% erythritol and sorbitol on examined materials. A greater inhibitory effect was noted for glass ionomers compared to composites. Sucrose and xylitol supported biofilm formation, while erythritol had the best inhibitory effect. The use of fluoride-releasing glass ionomers exerted an effect synergistic to erythritol, i.e., inhibited plaque formation and the amount of cariogenic S. mutans. Selection of proper type of dental material together with replacing sucrose with polyols can significantly decrease risk of secondary caries development. Erithritol in combination with glass ionomer seems to be the most effective in secondary caries prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Caries Risk Assessment and Management)
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Article
Caries Increment and Salivary Microbiome during University Life: A Prospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3713; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103713 - 25 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1694
Abstract
The purpose of this 3-year prospective cohort study was to explore the relationship between an increase in dental caries and oral microbiome among Japanese university students. We analyzed 487 students who volunteered to receive oral examinations and answer baseline (2013) and follow-up (2016) [...] Read more.
The purpose of this 3-year prospective cohort study was to explore the relationship between an increase in dental caries and oral microbiome among Japanese university students. We analyzed 487 students who volunteered to receive oral examinations and answer baseline (2013) and follow-up (2016) questionnaires. Of these students, salivary samples were randomly collected from 55 students at follow-up and analyzed using next-generation sequencing. Students were divided into two groups: increased group (Δdecayed, missing, and filled teeth (ΔDMFT) score increased during the 3-year period) and non-increased group (ΔDMFT did not increase). Thirteen phyla, 21 classes, 32 orders, 48 families, 72 genera, and 156 species were identified. Microbial diversity in the increased group (n = 14) was similar to that in the non-increased group (n = 41). Relative abundances of the family Prevotellaceae (p = 0.007) and genera Alloprevotella (p = 0.007) and Dialister (p = 0.039) were enriched in the increased group compared with the non-increased group. Some bacterial taxonomic clades were differentially present between the two groups. These results may contribute to the development of new dental caries prevention strategies, including the development of detection kits and enlightenment activities for these bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Caries Risk Assessment and Management)
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