Special Issue "Family Planning and Reproductive Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gizachew Tessema
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: reproductive health; family planning; perinatal epidemiology; global health
Prof. Dr. Gavin Pereira
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: biostatistics; environmental sciences; epidemiology; paediatrics and reproductive medicine
Dr. Yordanos Molla
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Pathfinder International, 1015 15th Street N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20005, USA
Interests: reproductive, maternal, newborn, adolescent and child health (RMNCH); monitoring and evaluation; global health programs and implementation research; GIS and spatial analysis; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Family planning and reproductive health services are critical interventions to the overall health of a population. These interventions are proven and cost-effective, and are central elements for female empowerment, reducing poverty, and a country’s development. Family planning can help women and men to exercise their rights in making voluntary and informed decisions on the spacing and numbers of children they would like to have. While impressive global gains have been made in recent decades in improving contraceptive use and decreasing fertility rates, over 214 million women of reproductive age, women mostly in low-and middle-income countries and who want to avoid pregnancy, are not using a modern contraceptive method.

Lack of access to proper family planning and reproductive health services may threaten individuals’ ability to build a better future for themselves, their families, and their communities. Improving family planning and reproductive health services is also one of the main focuses for achieving sustainable development goals.

This Special Issue seeks to expand knowledge on examining best practice in family planning and reproductive health services, understand factors impeding family planning and reproductive health services in general or special populations such as young adolescents and people having disabilities, and evaluate effective interventions to improve access to these services. Empirical studies and high-quality systematic reviews will be considered.

Dr. Gizachew Tessema
Assoc. Prof. Gavin Pereira
Dr. Yordanos Molla
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Reproductive health
  • Family planning
  • Fertility
  • Contraceptive services
  • Adolescent reproductive health
  • Reproductive health needs of special populations, e.g., people with disabilities
  • Birth spacing
  • Infertility treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Family Planning Uptake in Kagera and Mara Regions in Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Community Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1651; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041651 - 09 Feb 2021
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Abstract
In Tanzania, 27.1% of all women of reproductive age are currently using modern contraception and 16.8% have an unmet need for family planning. We therefore examined factors associated with family planning uptake after giving birth in two regions of Tanzania. The survey, which [...] Read more.
In Tanzania, 27.1% of all women of reproductive age are currently using modern contraception and 16.8% have an unmet need for family planning. We therefore examined factors associated with family planning uptake after giving birth in two regions of Tanzania. The survey, which collected information beyond that collected in the Tanzania Demographic Health Survey, used a two-stage, stratified-cluster sampling design, conducted in April 2016 in Mara and Kagera regions in Tanzania. A total of 1184 women aged 15–49 years, who had given birth less than two years prior to the survey were included. Logistic regression mixed effect modelling was used to examine factors associated with family planning uptake. A total of 393 (33.2%) women used family planning methods and 929 (79%) required prior approval from their partners. Participation of men in utilization of maternal health care was low, where 680 (57.8%) women responded that their partners accompanied them to at least one antenatal care (ANC) counselling visit and 120 (10%) responded that their partners participated in family planning counselling. Women who did not want to disclose whether they had discussed family planning with their partners, strikingly had the highest percentage of using family planning methods after birth. Factors independently associated with family planning uptake included: having discussed family planning with the partner (aOR 3.22; 95% CI 1.99–5.21), having been counselled on family planning during antenatal care (aOR 2.68; 95% CI 1.78–4.05), having discussed family planning with a community health worker (CHW) (aOR 4.59; 95% CI 2.53–8.33) and with a facility health care worker (aOR 1.93; 95% CI 1.29–2.90), having primary or higher educational level (aOR 1.66; 95% CI 1.01–2.273), and being in union (aOR 1.86; 95% CI 1.02–3.42). Educational interaction with community and facility health workers, as well as having a supportive partner as facilitator increased uptake of family planning. This needs to be prioritized in regions with similar socio-cultural norms in Tanzania and beyond. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family Planning and Reproductive Health)
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Article
Prevalence, Correlates, and Barriers of Contraceptive Use among Women Attending Primary Health Centers in Aljouf Region, Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3552; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103552 - 19 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1013
Abstract
(1) Backgrounds and Objectives: with the rapid alteration in the socio-demographic pattern of the Saudi community, particularly the changes concerned with women’s education and work force, contraceptive use must be a fundamental aspect in the life of women in reproductive age. The [...] Read more.
(1) Backgrounds and Objectives: with the rapid alteration in the socio-demographic pattern of the Saudi community, particularly the changes concerned with women’s education and work force, contraceptive use must be a fundamental aspect in the life of women in reproductive age. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence and correlates of contraceptive use among women attending primary health centers in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia, and to determine the perceived barriers of stopping or not using contraceptive methods in this population. (2) Methods: a primary health center-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 369 women of reproductive age. Data collection was done by using structured questionnaires distributed during face to face interviews with the participants. Data were analyzed using the SPSS program, version 24. (3) Results: most of the participants (n = 166; 45%) were current contraceptive users and 32.2% (n = 119) reported previous use of contraceptive methods. Pills were the most frequently used method (n = 203; 71.2%) and intrauterine devices (IUDs) came next (n = 67; 23.5%) while surgery was the least common method among the respondents (n = 3; 1.1%). Logistic regression analysis showed that the significant predictors of contraceptive use were: age > 35 years (odds ratio (OR): 4.52; confidence interval (CI): 1.56–15.42), Children number ≥ 4 (odds ratio (OR): 1.41; confidence interval (CI): 1.06–1.92) and monthly income ≥ 5000 Saudi Riyal (RS) (odds ratio (OR): 2.29; confidence interval (CI): 1.24–8.27). The most perceived barriers towards contraceptive utilization were cultural, demographic, medical, administrative, and barriers related to the method itself. The least reported barriers were psychosocial and physical. (4) Conclusions: the present study showed a high prevalence of contraceptive use among Saudi women in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The study recommended sustained efforts to increase population awareness of the importance of family planning. Policymakers should discover the barriers that prevent contraceptive utilization by women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family Planning and Reproductive Health)
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Review

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Review
Incidence of Post-Vasectomy Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1788; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051788 - 10 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1539
Abstract
This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to ascertain incidences of post-vasectomy pain following traditional scalpel, or non-scalpel vasectomy. Electronic databases PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were searched up to 1 July 2019 for peer-reviewed articles recording post-vasectomy pain. We identified 733 publications, [...] Read more.
This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to ascertain incidences of post-vasectomy pain following traditional scalpel, or non-scalpel vasectomy. Electronic databases PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were searched up to 1 July 2019 for peer-reviewed articles recording post-vasectomy pain. We identified 733 publications, screened 559 after removal of duplicates and excluded 533. Of the remaining 26 full-text articles, 8 were excluded with reasons, leaving 18 for detailed analyses. Meta-analysis was performed on 25 separate datasets (11 scalpel, 11 non-scalpel, 3 other/combined). Study follow-up ranged from 2 weeks to 37 years and sample sizes from 12 to 723 patients. The overall incidence of post-vasectomy pain was 15% (95% CI 9% to 25%). The incidences of post-vasectomy pain following scalpel and non-scalpel techniques were 24% (95% CI 15% to 36%) and 7% (95% CI 4% to 13%), respectively. Post-vasectomy pain syndrome occurred in 5% (95% CI 3% to 8%) of subjects, with similar estimates for both techniques. We conclude that the overall incidence of post-vasectomy pain is greater than previously reported, with three-fold higher rates of pain following traditional scalpel, compared to non-scalpel vasectomy, whereas the incidence of post-vasectomy pain syndrome is similar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family Planning and Reproductive Health)
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