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Special Issue "New Trends in Research on Physiology, Training, Performance, Evaluation, and Health in Football"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carlo Castagna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department Sport Science, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Roma, Italy
2. Fitness Training and Biomechanics Laboratory, Italian Football Federation (FIGC), Technical Department, Coverciano (Florence), 50136 Florence, Italy
Interests: performance development; testing; training load assessment; health and football; referee performance; fitness training in football; injury prevention
Dr. Susana Póvoas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, CIDESD, University Institute of Maia, ISMAI, 4475-690 Maia, Portugal
2. Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark
Interests: recreational team sports; football for health; handball for health; elite sport performance; exercise and health enhancement
Prof. Dr. Morten B. Randers
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark
2. School of Sport Sciences, The Artic University of Norway, 9019 Tromsø, Norway
Interests: strength and conditioning in football; recreational football and health; recreational basketball for health; elite football
Prof. Dr. Fabrizio Perroni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Section on Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, 61029 Urbino, Italy
Interests: exercise; functional evaluation; hormonal aspects; puberty; training; soccer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Football is not a matter of life or death, it is much more than that, and the millions of football players and fans are proof of this.

Football entertains millions and millions of players at different competitive levels and a huge body of evidence suggests its use to improve physical and mental health.

In addition to being the most popular sport on the planet (we have yet to know if it is played in other parts of the universe), compelling evidence promotes football as a low-cost means of contributing to health and well-being that is easily accessible to everybody and that has very limited side effects. With just twice a week participation in small-scale games of football, recreational players may improve their cardiovascular fitness, strength, balance and body composition while having fun.  

National and international governing bodies are promoting female football all over the planet and soon the reported number of footballers is expected to dramatically increase. Furthermore, female referees are more and more involved in the male game, proposing new challenges to develop an ergonomic model of football.  Novel studies addressing the various aspects of football training and competition is warranted. The social capital of the dissemination of scientific advancements applied to football constitute an ethical goal.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health will publish advancements in science applied to competitive and recreational football. Research papers on training and match load management, testing, and the health effects of football are suitable contributions for this Special Issue.

All submitted papers will be peer-reviewed by leading researchers in the field of football to ensure the highest quality contributions for this Special Issue on the "New Trends in Research on Physiology, Training, Performance, Evaluation, and Health in Football".

Prof. Dr. Carlo Castagna
Dr. Susana Póvoas
Prof. Dr. Morten B. Randers
Prof. Dr. Fabrizio Perroni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • field testing
  • soccer
  • training load
  • internal load
  • cardiorespiratory fitness
  • sprint endurance
  • refereeing
  • youth football
  • female football
  • football for fitness
  • injury prevention
  • strength training
  • anaerobic training
  • recovery
  • cardiovascular health
  • bone health
  • diabetes management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Importance of Selected Coordination Motor Skills for an Individual Football Player’s Effectiveness in a Game
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(2), 728; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19020728 - 10 Jan 2022
Viewed by 94
Abstract
The appropriate level of coordination motor skills (CMS) in a football player is one of the factors determining the effectiveness of their actions. Adaptability and complex reaction time are of particular importance in models of coordination requirements in football. The lead aim of [...] Read more.
The appropriate level of coordination motor skills (CMS) in a football player is one of the factors determining the effectiveness of their actions. Adaptability and complex reaction time are of particular importance in models of coordination requirements in football. The lead aim of this study is to determine the relationship between two selected coordination motor skills and the offensive, defensive and comprehensive effectiveness of an individual player’s actions. The study was conducted on a group of 91 Polish male football players aged 20 to 31 years, all in the senior age category. The research tools included: a test assessing motor adaptation (research by dribbling the ball with the dominant leg), psychomotor test of complex reaction time (tested with an S-10.2 measuring device) and a test of the effectiveness of an individual player’s actions (one-on-one simulation game). The conducted research indicated that adaptability and complex reaction time are both important abilities for success when attacking in an individual game, and in the assessment of a comprehensive index of individual competences in a one-on-one football game. However, the most significant factor influencing the effectiveness of a player’s defensive action is solely the complex reaction time. Full article
Communication
Eccentric Hamstring Muscle Strength during Home Confinement Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, and Football Competition Resumption in Professional Football Referees: A Prospective Observational Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9737; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18189737 - 15 Sep 2021
Viewed by 953
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has produced a major disruption for professional football leagues that has affected the physical preparation of both football players and referees. In Spain, health authorities decreed home confinement for eight weeks, supressing the normal training routines of professional referees. After [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has produced a major disruption for professional football leagues that has affected the physical preparation of both football players and referees. In Spain, health authorities decreed home confinement for eight weeks, supressing the normal training routines of professional referees. After home confinement, referees had four weeks to retrain as the national football league was set to resume matches to complete the 11 games remaining. The aim of the present investigation was to assess changes in eccentric hamstring muscle strength during football competition suspension/resumption due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 21 professional football referees (mean ± SD, age: 33.4 ± 5.1 years; height: 182.4 ± 5.0 cm; body mass: 75.1 ± 4.4 kg). Eccentric hamstring muscle strength was measured with the Nordic hamstring exercise at four time points. During home confinement, referees presented the lowest value of bilateral eccentric muscle strength (300 ± 14 N). Eccentric muscle strength increased by 13.2 ± 3.7% one week after the end of home confinement (339 ± 16 N; p = 0.001, effect size (ES) = 2.8) and remained stable before the first match (343 ± 17 N; p = 0.001, ES = 3.1) and after the end of the national league (328 ± 13 N; p = 0.001, ES = 2.0). In summary, home confinement produced detraining effects in professional football referees associated with hamstring muscle weakness. In this regard, strength-based activities with body loads may be insufficient to avoid muscle weakness and other means (e.g., weights) may be necessary to maintain muscle strength. However, the 4-weeks retraining period was sufficient to resolve hamstring muscle weakness induced by the restrictions of home confinement. This information may be helpful in the case of future sport competition suspension or home quarantine due to new waves of COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
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