Special Issue "Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Damien Leger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre du Sommeil et de la Vigilance, Université de Paris, APHP, Hôtel Dieu, EA 7330 VIFASOM, Paris, France
Interests: sleep; public health; epidemiology; occupational medicine; cognition; sleep debt
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Michael A. Grandner
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Sleep and Health Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona, PO Box 245002, Tucson, AZ 85724-5002, USA
Interests: real-world impacts of sleep health; sleep and cardiometabolic health; sleep and daytime function; social, behavioral and environmental determinants of sleep; sleep and health disparities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to contribute to a unique Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health named “Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health”. The aim of this issue is to feature articles that describe how sleep and sleep disorders have a specific and important impact on public health.

As a first step, we would like to explain how insufficient sleep may be considered as a risk factor for overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular risks in adults and in children.

Then, we would describe how sleep reflects the disturbed environment: noise, light pollution, temperature, and screen addictions in children.

Thirdly, we would aim to assess the societal cost of sleep disorders, insomnia, shift-work disorders, sleep apnea, and hypersomnia.

Finally, we would focus on the topic of sleep, sleep disorder, and Artificial intelligence (AI), and public health perspectives. This includes implementing AI in insomnia, sleep apnea, night shift-work, and the role of wearables in assessing sleep in chronic diseases.

We thank you in advance for contributing in this very timely topic.

Sincerely.

Prof. Dr. Damien Leger
Prof. Dr. Michael A. Grandner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sleep
  • Public health
  • Epidemiology
  • Sleep disorders
  • Sleep debt
  • Environment
  • Night work
  • Costs
  • Artificial intelligence

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
The Relationship between the Lunar Phase, Menstrual Cycle Onset and Subjective Sleep Quality among Women of Reproductive Age
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3245; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063245 - 21 Mar 2021
Viewed by 784
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association among lunar cycle, menstrual cycle onset, and subjective sleep quality. Menstrual cycle onset data from the six most recent menstrual cycles were obtained for 529 women (aged 25–39 years) using the smartphone [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association among lunar cycle, menstrual cycle onset, and subjective sleep quality. Menstrual cycle onset data from the six most recent menstrual cycles were obtained for 529 women (aged 25–39 years) using the smartphone app Luna Luna. We also collected questionnaire survey data on sleep quality from each participant. Overall, there was no association between the onset of menstrual cycle and lunar phase. Interestingly, the proportion of good sleepers with menstrual cycle beginning during the light period was significantly higher than that during the dark period, while the proportion of poor sleepers with menstrual cycle beginning during the dark period was significantly higher than that during the light period. When participants were categorized by the combination of lunar phases (light, dark, neutral periods) in the two most recent menstrual cycle onsets, the “both dark period” group and the “other (light and dark) period” group showed the lowest proportion of good sleepers. Menstrual cycle onset in the dark period was associated with a deterioration in subsequent subjective sleep quality, which was more apparent with consecutive onsets in the dark period or at a rapidly changing lunar phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health)
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Article
A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Polyphenol Botanical Blend on Sleep and Daytime Functioning
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3044; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063044 - 16 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1255
Abstract
Despite the high prevalence of subclinical sleep disturbances, existing treatments are either potent prescription medications or over-the-counter supplements with minimal scientific support and numerous side effects. However, preliminary evidence shows that polyphenols such as rosmarinic acid and epigallocatechin gallate can support healthy sleep [...] Read more.
Despite the high prevalence of subclinical sleep disturbances, existing treatments are either potent prescription medications or over-the-counter supplements with minimal scientific support and numerous side effects. However, preliminary evidence shows that polyphenols such as rosmarinic acid and epigallocatechin gallate can support healthy sleep without significant side effects. Therefore, the present study examined whether a polyphenol botanical blend (PBB) could improve sleep and/or daytime functioning in individuals with subclinical sleep disturbances. A total of 89 individuals completed a double-blind, randomized trial of daily treatment with PBB (n = 43) or placebo (n = 46) 30 min before bed for 30 days. Participants were monitored for changes in sleep (by sleep diary and an activity tracker), mood, and neurocognitive functioning. After 30 days, PBB improved diary sleep quality (p = 0.008) and reduced insomnia severity (p = 0.044) when compared to placebo. No other changes in sleep outcomes were observed. Additionally, PBB did not impair neurocognitive functioning, and some improvement was noted in vigilant attention, working memory, and risk assessment. Among individuals with subclinical sleep disturbances, PBB improved sleep quality, insomnia severity, and neurocognitive functioning over placebo. These findings indicate that polyphenol compounds may be useful for improving certain aspects of sleep without compromising neurocognitive functioning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health)
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Article
The Impact of Perceived Sleep, Mood and Alcohol Use on Verbal, Physical and Sexual Assault Experiences among Student Athletes and Student Non-Athletes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2883; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18062883 - 11 Mar 2021
Viewed by 634
Abstract
Previous research has shown that student athletes are more likely to be involved in a physical altercation or be a victim of verbal, physical and/or sexual abuse than student non-athletes, which can have long-lasting negative effects on mood, behavior and quality of life. [...] Read more.
Previous research has shown that student athletes are more likely to be involved in a physical altercation or be a victim of verbal, physical and/or sexual abuse than student non-athletes, which can have long-lasting negative effects on mood, behavior and quality of life. In addition, among college students, sleep difficulties are ubiquitous and may deteriorate the unique life experience that university represents. The influences of poor sleep quality, mood and alcohol consumption related to these events are examined here between student athletes and student non-athletes. A series of hierarchical logistic regressions explored the relationship between verbal, physical and sexual assault risk factors. Results suggest that poor sleep, alcohol consumption and mood are all associated with exposure to a physical altercation or episode of abuse, irrespective of athlete status. Results also show that variables targeting self-reported difficulty sleeping and experiences of verbal, physical and sexual assault were positively associated. However, given the cross-sectional nature of the study, it is impossible to establish the direction of these relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health)
Article
Sleep, Prospective Memory, and Immune Status among People Living with HIV
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 438; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020438 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 755
Abstract
Background: Persons living with HIV (PLWH) frequently report sleep complaints, but objective measurements are still lacking regarding sleep continuity, total sleep time per 24 h, and the links with both prospective memory performance and HIV infection parameters. Methods: PLWH (n = 96) [...] Read more.
Background: Persons living with HIV (PLWH) frequently report sleep complaints, but objective measurements are still lacking regarding sleep continuity, total sleep time per 24 h, and the links with both prospective memory performance and HIV infection parameters. Methods: PLWH (n = 96) and control (n = 96) groups (balanced for gender and age) were monitored by 24h-actigraphy for at least seven consecutive days. The prospective memory performance was assessed through a naturalistic, activity-based task performed twice a day on the actigraph. Results: PLWH had greater sleep latency and worse sleep continuity (higher fragmentation index) for night-time sleep and longest daytime nap (mean duration of the longest nap). Comparable results were reported for the prospective memory task; better performance scores were associated with several sleep parameters in controls but not in PLWH. Finally, within the PLWH group, being a long sleeper per 24 h (total sleep time > 8 h including more and long daytime naps) was associated with a greater severity of the disease (lower CD4 nadir and more frequent history of AIDS-defining events). Conclusions: These findings indicate that PLWH have more fragmented sleep and that the severity of HIV infection is associated with increased sleep duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health)
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Article
Acculturation Associated with Sleep Duration, Sleep Quality, and Sleep Disorders at the US–Mexico Border
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7138; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197138 - 29 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 951
Abstract
Sleep disparities exist among Hispanics/Latinos, although little work has characterized individuals at the United States (US)–Mexico border, particularly as it relates to acculturation. This study examined the association of Anglo and Mexican acculturation to various facets of sleep health among those of Mexican [...] Read more.
Sleep disparities exist among Hispanics/Latinos, although little work has characterized individuals at the United States (US)–Mexico border, particularly as it relates to acculturation. This study examined the association of Anglo and Mexican acculturation to various facets of sleep health among those of Mexican descent at the US–Mexico border. Data were collected from N = 100 adults of Mexican descent in the city of Nogales, Arizona (AZ). Surveys were presented in English or Spanish. Acculturation was assessed with the Acculturation Scale for Mexican-Americans (ARSMA-II). Insomnia was assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), sleepiness was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), sleep apnea risk was assessed with the Multivariable Apnea Prediction (MAP) index, weekday and weekend sleep duration and efficiency were assessed with the Sleep Timing Questionnaire, sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and sleep duration and sleep medication use were assessed with PSQI items. No associations were found between Mexican acculturation and any sleep outcomes in adjusted analyses. Anglo acculturation was associated with less weekend sleep duration and efficiency, worse insomnia severity and sleep quality, and more sleep apnea risk and sleep medication use. These results support the idea that sleep disparities may depend on the degree of acculturation, which should be considered in risk screening and interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Sleep Disorders and Public Health)
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