Special Issue "Land Development and Management Strategies for Climate Change Adaptation"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land–Climate Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. D. Ary A. Samsura
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Management Research, Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 141, 6500HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: land management; decision making in spatial planning; urban planning; climate mitigation and adaptation; sustainable development management; collaborative planning
Prof. Dr. Erwin van der Krabben
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Management Research, Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 141, 6500HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: land policy; value capture; urban transformation; business parks; retail trade policy; site development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Kristoffer B. Berse
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National College of Public Administration and Govenrnance, University of the Philippines, R.P. De Guzman St., Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
Interests: disaster risk governance; crisis management; climate change adaptation; policy analysis; inter-local cooperation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The combined forces of climate change, globalization, and urbanization are predicted to increase major disruptions and greater loss of life also property across the globe in the foreseeable future. At the same time, there is mounting evidence showing the linkage between land development and climate change. Better land development and management strategies could help communities to respond to extreme events and reduce future risk by providing guidance for development and/or redevelopment in current and forecasted vulnerable areas to increase their resilience. Apart from that, land development strategies like land value capture could be used to create new opportunities in making investments to improve adaptation and ecosystem services that at the same time could improve opportunities for economic development. However, there is also some evidence that shows how land development had exacerbated inequalities across diverse social, economic and environmental conditions. Hence, it is important to review what has and has not worked in planning, implementing, and financing the land development process that delivers measurable outcomes for the local people that depend on them.

This special issue is intended to provide an understanding of influences of climate change on land uses and values, including the techniques that can be used to assess those influences as well as the key policy tools related to land development and investment strategies that can effectively and efficiently  help the most vulnerable communities from the impact of climate change.

We, therefore, invite contributions covering, for example, the following topics:

  • Lessons learned from different countries showing the best and/or bad practices of land management and development and their linkage to climate change.
  • Innovative approaches for land management and development strategies to support climate change adaptation;
  • New tools and technologies to support multi-stakeholder planning and/or collaborative management approach in land management and development processes to support climate change adaptation.

Dr. D. Ary A. Samsura
Prof. Dr. Erwin van der Krabben
Dr. Kristoffer B. Berse
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Land Development
  • Land Management
  • Land Value Capture
  • Climate Adaptation
  • Resilience
  • Urban and regional Planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Developing a Climate Change Vulnerability Index for Coastal City Sustainability, Mitigation, and Adaptation: A Case Study of Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia
Land 2021, 10(11), 1271; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land10111271 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 372
Abstract
Coastal hazards are an urgent issue of global concern considering the increasing population pressure in coastal regions, retreating coastlines, and rising seawater levels. Here we demonstrate the process of assessing the vulnerability of a coastal urban environment using the case of Kuala Terengganu, [...] Read more.
Coastal hazards are an urgent issue of global concern considering the increasing population pressure in coastal regions, retreating coastlines, and rising seawater levels. Here we demonstrate the process of assessing the vulnerability of a coastal urban environment using the case of Kuala Terengganu, a coastal town in Malaysia, and evaluating the potential social, environmental, and economic impacts. Uncertainties in the human dimensions of global change deeply affect the assessment and responses to environmental, climatic, and non-climate impacts on coastal city population growth and communities. We address these uncertainties by combining a Delphi-Analytical Hierarchy Process (Delphi-AHP) model and Geographic Information System (GIS)tools to determine mitigation and adaptation probabilities as part of a Coastal City Vulnerability Assessment. We conclude by presenting calculations of the short- and long-term suitability for land use and recommending hazard mitigation measures to equip city planners and decision-makers in evaluating hazards and potential impacts on coastal city areas. Full article
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Article
Understanding the Impact of Land Resource Misallocation on Carbon Emissions in China
Land 2021, 10(11), 1188; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/land10111188 - 05 Nov 2021
Viewed by 285
Abstract
In order to achieve growth in fiscal revenue and the regional economy under the Chinese decentralization system, the land resources misallocation (LRM) among different industries was promoted through the differentiated land supply strategy, which has a vital role in carbon emissions. This study [...] Read more.
In order to achieve growth in fiscal revenue and the regional economy under the Chinese decentralization system, the land resources misallocation (LRM) among different industries was promoted through the differentiated land supply strategy, which has a vital role in carbon emissions. This study theoretically analyzes the overall effect and the effect of the intermediate LRM mechanism on carbon emissions and empirically tests the impact of LRM on carbon emissions based on panel data collected from 30 provinces in China from 2005 to 2017 using the environmental Kuznets curve theory. The results show that (1) the local governments have monopolized the primary land market across the nation, leading to resource misallocation among industrial, commercial, and residential land. This inefficient and unsustainable allocation aggravated the release of carbon emissions. (2) The impact of LRM on carbon emissions has varied among different regions. LRM in the eastern and central regions significantly exacerbated carbon emissions. A greater impact on carbon emissions occurred in the eastern region, while the impact was insignificant in the western region. (3) There are two mechanisms through which LRM affects carbon emissions. One is the restraint of upgrading industrial structure, and the other is the restriction of technological innovations. In conclusion, speeding up the reform of the tax sharing system is suggested to reduce the excessive dependence of local governments on land resources. Meanwhile, in order to reduce carbon emissions, the land acquisition and transfer system should be reformed to gradually achieve the market-oriented allocation of land resources, and the benefits coordination mechanism of different land transfer modes should be established. Finally, we propose different carbon emission reduction policies for the heterogeneity of regional economic development. Full article
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