Special Issue "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carlo Caffarelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy
Interests: inflammation; allergic diseases; asthma; asthma management; allergy; allergy diagnosis; allergens; allergic sensitization; allergic rhinitis; food allergies; urticaria; anaphylaxis; skin tests
Prof. Dr. Giampaolo Ricci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: allergy; allergy diagnosis; allergens; allergic asthma
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Allergy and Immunology represents one of the most fascinating fields in children. Related diseases have reached epidemic proportions worldwide.

Novel knowledge on disease pathogenesis has opened up new clinical and therapeutic approaches for autoimmune and allergic disorders, including desensitization and biological drugs. Component-resolved diagnosis with recombinant allergens has improved the diagnosis and also clinical decisions. When it comes to pediatric patients especially, we should find innovative procedures to prevent the evolution of food allergy toward respiratory allergic diseases. Better understanding of pathogenesis and treatment means improving the quality of life of children and their parents.

The purpose of the Special Issue entitled “Pediatric Allergy and Immunology” is to update knowledge on epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment in pediatric allergy and immunology.

We encourage the submission of original manuscripts and reviews on this subject. We remain at your disposal for additional questions.

Prof. Carlo Caffarelli
Prof. Giampaolo Ricci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Clinical immunology
  • Hypersensitivity
  • Autoimmunity
  • Inflammation
  • Immune dysfunction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Tumor Suppressors—HTRA Proteases and Interleukin-12—in Pediatric Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Patients
Medicina 2020, 56(6), 298; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina56060298 - 17 Jun 2020
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Abstract
Background and objective: Allergy belongs to a group of mast cell-related disorders and is one of the most common diseases of childhood. It was shown that asthma and allergic rhinitis diminish the risk of various cancers, including colon cancer and acute lymphoblastic [...] Read more.
Background and objective: Allergy belongs to a group of mast cell-related disorders and is one of the most common diseases of childhood. It was shown that asthma and allergic rhinitis diminish the risk of various cancers, including colon cancer and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. On the other hand, asthma augments the risk of lung cancer and an increased risk of breast cancer in patients with allergy has been observed. Thus, the relation between allergy and cancer is not straightforward and furthermore, its biological mechanism is unknown. The HTRA (high temperature requirement A) proteases promote apoptosis, may function as tumor suppressors and HTRA1 is known to be released by mast cells. Interleukin-12 (Il-12) is an important cytokine that induces antitumor immune responses and is produced mainly by dendritic cells that co-localize with mast cells in superficial organs. Material and methods: In the present study we have assessed with ELISA plasma levels of the HTRA proteins, Il-12, and of the anti-HTRA autoantibodies in children with allergy (40) and in age matched controls (39). Children are a special population, since they usually do not have comorbidities and take not many drugs the processes we want to observe are not influenced by many other factors. Results: We have found a significant increase of HTRA1, 2 and 3, and of the Il-12 levels in the children with atopy (asthma and allergic rhinitis) compared to controls. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the HTRA1–3 and Il-12 levels might be useful in analyzing the pro- and antioncogenic potential in young atopic patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Allergy and Immunology)
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Review

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Review
Mast Cell Activation Disorders
Medicina 2021, 57(2), 124; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina57020124 - 30 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Mast cell disorders comprise a wide spectrum of syndromes caused by mast cells’ degranulation with acute or chronic clinical manifestations. Materials and Methods: In this review article we reviewed the latest findings in scientific papers about mast cell disorders with [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Mast cell disorders comprise a wide spectrum of syndromes caused by mast cells’ degranulation with acute or chronic clinical manifestations. Materials and Methods: In this review article we reviewed the latest findings in scientific papers about mast cell disorders with a particular focus on mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytosis in pediatric age. Results: Patients with mast cell activation syndrome have a normal number of mast cells that are hyperreactive upon stimulation of various triggers. We tried to emphasize the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic strategies. Another primary mast cell disorder is mastocytosis, a condition with a long-known disease, in which patients have an increased number of mast cells that accumulate in different regions of the body with different clinical evolution in pediatric age. Conclusions: Mast cell activation syndrome overlaps with different clinical entities. No consensus was found on biomarkers and no clearly resolutive treatment is available. Therefore, a more detailed knowledge of this syndrome is of fundamental importance for a correct diagnosis and effective therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Allergy and Immunology)
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Review
Hypersensitivity Reactions to Monoclonal Antibodies in Children
Medicina 2020, 56(5), 232; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina56050232 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
Biologic drugs are widely used in pediatric medicine. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in particular are a therapeutic option for rheumatic, autoinflammatory and oncologic diseases. Adverse drug reactions and hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to mAbs may occur in children. Clinical presentation of HSRs to mAbs can [...] Read more.
Biologic drugs are widely used in pediatric medicine. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in particular are a therapeutic option for rheumatic, autoinflammatory and oncologic diseases. Adverse drug reactions and hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to mAbs may occur in children. Clinical presentation of HSRs to mAbs can be classified according to phenotypes in infusion-related reactions, cytokine release syndrome, both alpha type reactions and type I (IgE/non-IgE), type III, and type IV reactions, all beta-type reactions. The aim of this review is to focus on HSRs associated with the most frequent mAbs in childhood, with particular attention to beta-type reactions. When a reaction to mAbs is suspected a diagnostic work-up including in-vivo and in-vitro testing should be performed. A drug provocation test is recommended only when no alternative drugs are available. In selected patients with immediate IgE-mediated drug allergy a desensitization protocol is indicated. Despite the heavy use of mAbs in childhood, studies evaluating the reliability of diagnostic test are lacking. Although desensitization may be effective in reducing the risk of reactions in children, standardized pediatric protocols are still not available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Allergy and Immunology)
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