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Special Issue "New Sensors and Flexible 3D-Printed Devices for Human Activity Monitoring: From Materials to Electronic Conditioning"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Paolo Visconti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departament of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: design and testing of IoT-based electronic systems; smart remote control of facilities; electronic systems for automation and automotive; energy harvesting systems for sensors nodes; wearable devices for health monitoring; new materials and advanced sensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, wearable sensing devices have increasingly spread in people’s lives, enabling real-time monitoring of users’ conditions relatively to the health status, physical activity, and much more; some of the peculiarities of such devices are their flexibility, very low cost and power dissipation, wireless connectivity, reduced invasiveness, manufacturing simplicity, and multifunctionality. Specifically, the development of wearable or implantable human sensors for medical diagnostics and sport activity control covers several research fields, such as body-sensors for the detection of different biomarkers such as glucose, lactic acid, pH or cholesterol, as well as for monitoring biophysical parameters such as heart rate, temperature, breath rate, walk or body posture monitoring, fall detection, muscle contractions, etc. Further, 3D printing technology can be employed for the development of new wearable and flexible sensors, taking advantage of its simplicity, low cost, rapidity, and ability to reproduce complex geometries. These 3D-printed flexible electronic devices can be applied widely in the fields of personal wearable devices, prosthetic organs for the disabled, and human–computer interfaces. All these sensors need a suitable electronic conditioning section for impedance matching and adapting the characteristics of the signal provided by the sensor to the designed acquisition system. Finally, in this field, research activity concerns the development of new materials and sensing methodologies for the design of new wearable or implantable sensors of a new generation as well as the use of new energy harvesting techniques to make the devices energetically autonomous.

Summing up, this Special Issue “New Sensors and Flexible 3D-Printed Devices for Human Activity Monitoring: From Materials to Electronic Conditioning” aims to bring together innovative developments and synergies in the following topics (without being limited to them):

  • Wearable sensors for biophysical parameters;
  • SoC for health monitoring applications;
  • Biomarkers for biofluid detection (sweat/saliva/interstitial fluids/tears);
  • Electrochemical bio-sensors;
  • Less battery-implantable devices;
  • 3D printing technology applied to wearable sensor development;
  • Flexible sensors and actuators for wearable devices;
  • Soft electronics for the signal conditioning applied to wearable sensors;
  • Smart prostheses and artificial organs;
  • Charging methods for implanted devices;
  • Energy-harvesting techniques for wearable/implantable body devices;
  • Low-power electronic solutions for signals acquisition/processing from wearable sensors;
  • New materials and sensing methodologies;
  • Software development for wearable sensors and body sensor networks.

Prof. Dr. Paolo Visconti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wearable human sensors
  • Implantable devices Health monitoring
  • 3D printing technology
  • Energy harvesting
  • Smart prostheses
  • New materials for biosensors
  • Signals’ electronic conditioning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Thermal Characterization of New 3D-Printed Bendable, Coplanar Capacitive Sensors
Sensors 2021, 21(19), 6324; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s21196324 - 22 Sep 2021
Viewed by 590
Abstract
In this paper a new low-cost stretchable coplanar capacitive sensor for liquid level sensing is presented. It has been 3D-printed by employing commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and conductive materials and using a fused filament fabrication (FFF) process for monolithic fabrication. The sensor presents [...] Read more.
In this paper a new low-cost stretchable coplanar capacitive sensor for liquid level sensing is presented. It has been 3D-printed by employing commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and conductive materials and using a fused filament fabrication (FFF) process for monolithic fabrication. The sensor presents high linearity and good repeatability when measuring sunflower oil level. Experiments were performed to analyse the behaviour of the developed sensor when applying bending stimuli, in order to verify its flexibility, and a thermal characterization was performed in the temperature range from 10 °C to 40 °C to evaluate its effect on sunflower oil level measurement. The experimental results showed negligible sensitivity of the sensor to bending stimuli, whereas the thermal characterization produced a model describing the relationship between capacitance, temperature, and oil level, allowing temperature compensation in oil level measurement. The different temperature cycles allowed to quantify the main sources of uncertainty, and their effect on level measurement was evaluated. Full article
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