Special Issue "3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing: Principles and Applications"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Innovations in Materials Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jeng-Ywan Jeng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Dr. Ajeet Kumar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology is expected to bring a new revolution in the design and fabrication of products and there has been increasingly rapid research in the area of processes, materials and technology for the high-speed printing and reliability of additive manufactured parts. The concept of high speed in product realization started with rapid prototyping for concept and design evolution in short time and advanced in to 3D printing. The term 3D printing is more often used by makers and hobbyists for fabricating the idea. More advancement in 3D printing technologies has brought many industries to additive manufacturing for end part production. In the era of Industry 4.0, additive manufacturing has provided fresh opportunities to rethink design for not only customization and personalization but also to improve the efficiency and functionality of end products. Today, additive manufacturing technology faces many challenges before being fully adapted by various industries for end part production. Some of the major challenges are slow speed of fabrication, limited material, post processing and innovation in the adaptability of AM.

This Special Issue is to provide a platform to the researchers and practitioners to share their latest idea and research on new additive manufacturing technology, high speed additive manufacturing, the application of additive manufacturing, design for additive manufacturing, new material, and innovation in product design.

It is our pleasure to invite full length papers with original research, review papers and communications for this Special Issue on 3D printing and additive manufacturing, principles and challenges.

Dr. Jeng-Ywan Jeng
Dr. Ajeet Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Technologies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • design for additive manufacturing
  • high speed additive manufacturing
  • new AM technology and AM material (e.g., 4D printing)
  • cellular lattice structure, topology optimization
  • multimaterial printing
  • integrating AM for digital manufacturing
  • postprocessing of AM parts
  • medical, industrial and architecture application

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Shape-Memory Properties of 3D Printed Cubes from Diverse PLA Materials with Different Post-Treatments
Technologies 2021, 9(4), 71; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies9040071 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 267
Abstract
Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) belongs to the 3D printable materials which show shape-memory properties, i.e., which can recover their original shape after a deformation if they are heated above the glass transition temperature. This makes PLA quite an interesting material for diverse applications, such [...] Read more.
Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) belongs to the 3D printable materials which show shape-memory properties, i.e., which can recover their original shape after a deformation if they are heated above the glass transition temperature. This makes PLA quite an interesting material for diverse applications, such as bumpers, safety equipment for sports, etc. After investigating the influence of the infill design and degree, as well as the pressure orientation on the recovery properties of 3D printed PLA cubes in previous studies, here we report on differences between different PLA materials as well as on the impact of post-treatments after 3D printing by solvents or by heat. Our results show not only large differences between materials from different producers, but also a material-dependent impact of the post treatments. Generally, it is possible to tailor the mechanical and recovery properties of 3D printed PLA parts by choosing the proper material in combination with a chemical or temperature post-treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing: Principles and Applications)
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Review

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Review
Post-Processing of 3D-Printed Polymers
Technologies 2021, 9(3), 61; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies9030061 - 25 Aug 2021
Viewed by 677
Abstract
Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, is an advancement over traditional formative manufacturing methods. It can increase efficiency in manufacturing operations highlighting advantages such as rapid prototyping, reduction of waste, reduction of manufacturing time and cost, and increased flexibility in a production [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, is an advancement over traditional formative manufacturing methods. It can increase efficiency in manufacturing operations highlighting advantages such as rapid prototyping, reduction of waste, reduction of manufacturing time and cost, and increased flexibility in a production setting. The additive manufacturing (AM) process consists of five steps: (1) preparation of 3D models for printing (designing the part/object), (2) conversion to STL file, (3) slicing and setting of 3D printing parameters, (4) actual printing, and (5) finishing/post-processing methods. Very often, the 3D printed part is sufficient by itself without further post-printing processing. However, many applications still require some forms of post-processing, especially those for industrial applications. This review focuses on the importance of different finishing/post-processing methods for 3D-printed polymers. Different 3D printing technologies and materials are considered in presenting the authors’ perspective. The advantages and disadvantages of using these methods are also discussed together with the cost and time in doing the post-processing activities. Lastly, this review also includes discussions on the enhancement of properties such as electrical, mechanical, and chemical, and other characteristics such as geometrical precision, durability, surface properties, and aesthetic value with post-printing processing. Future perspectives is also provided towards the end of this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing: Principles and Applications)
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