Special Issue "Basic Studies for Vaccine Development Targeting Virus Infections"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Viral Immunology, Vaccines, and Antivirals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kyoko Tsukiyama-Kohara
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Guest Editor
Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan
Interests: viruses; vaccine; molecular biology; viral pathogenesis
Prof. Dr. Michinori Kohara
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Guest Editor
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: viruses; vaccine; molecular biology; viral pathogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The first vaccine against a viral infection was developed in 1798 for smallpox by Dr Edward Jenner, who utilized cow pox. This vaccine enabled the eradication of smallpox from the world in 1980. Thus, vaccination is a powerful tool for protection from pathogens, also applicable for the prevention of other diseases, including cancer.

Vaccines for many viral infections still need to be developed. Examples of diseases that could be controlled by vaccination are human immunodeficiency virus infection, hepatitis C, respiratory syncytial virus infection, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 disease. This Special Issue focuses on recent progress in the development of vaccines. Also, we welcome application studies of vaccines. This Special Issue aims to contribute to our knowledge of vaccine development and provide an opportunity to spread new information on vaccine research.

Prof. Dr. Kyoko Tsukiyama-Kohara
Prof. Dr. Michinori Kohara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • virus
  • vaccine
  • immune response
  • protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Mink Circovirus Capsid Subunit Expressed by Recombinant Baculovirus Protects Minks against Refractory Diarrhea in Field
Viruses 2021, 13(4), 606; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13040606 - 01 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Mink refractory diarrhea is a seasonal disease that occurs in many mink farms in China. Mink circovirus (MiCV) has been recognized as the causative agent of the disease. The aim of the study was to develop a subunit vaccine against mink refractory diarrhea. [...] Read more.
Mink refractory diarrhea is a seasonal disease that occurs in many mink farms in China. Mink circovirus (MiCV) has been recognized as the causative agent of the disease. The aim of the study was to develop a subunit vaccine against mink refractory diarrhea. A recombinant baculovirus strain expressing the capsid protein was constructed using the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). A subunit vaccine was developed based on the capsid protein with appropriate adjuvant. Then, a field trial was carried out in two districts in order to evaluate the efficiency of the subunit vaccine. The field trial indicated that in total, only 1.8% of the minks developed typical diarrhea in the vaccinated group compared with 74.5% in the control group. The vaccination could significantly reduce the infection rate of MiCV among the mink herds and could restrain the virus’ shedding from feces. Furthermore, the vaccinated group had a higher average litter size in the following year compared to the control group. Collectively, the results indicated that the subunit vaccine based on the capsid protein can provide reliable protection against MiCV infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Basic Studies for Vaccine Development Targeting Virus Infections)
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Review

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Review
Tree Shrew as an Emerging Small Animal Model for Human Viral Infection: A Recent Overview
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1641; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13081641 - 18 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Viral infection is a global public health threat causing millions of deaths. A suitable small animal model is essential for viral pathogenesis and host response studies that could be used in antiviral and vaccine development. The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri or Tupaia [...] Read more.
Viral infection is a global public health threat causing millions of deaths. A suitable small animal model is essential for viral pathogenesis and host response studies that could be used in antiviral and vaccine development. The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri or Tupaia belangeri chinenesis), a squirrel-like non-primate small mammal in the Tupaiidae family, has been reported to be susceptible to important human viral pathogens, including hepatitis viruses (e.g., HBV, HCV), respiratory viruses (influenza viruses, SARS-CoV-2, human adenovirus B), arboviruses (Zika virus and dengue virus), and other viruses (e.g., herpes simplex virus, etc.). The pathogenesis of these viruses is not fully understood due to the lack of an economically feasible suitable small animal model mimicking natural infection of human diseases. The tree shrew model significantly contributes towards a better understanding of the infection and pathogenesis of these important human pathogens, highlighting its potential to be used as a viable viral infection model of human viruses. Therefore, in this review, we summarize updates regarding human viral infection in the tree shrew model, which highlights the potential of the tree shrew to be utilized for human viral infection and pathogenesis studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Basic Studies for Vaccine Development Targeting Virus Infections)
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