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Article

Associations among Employment Status, Health Behaviors, and Mental Health in a Representative Sample of South Koreans

Department of Research Planning, Mental Health Research Institute, National Center for Mental Health, Seoul 04933, Korea
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2456; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072456
Received: 7 January 2020 / Revised: 15 March 2020 / Accepted: 1 April 2020 / Published: 3 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Social Determinants of Mental Health)
The purpose of the present study was to compare the health behaviors, general health, and mental health of South Korean employees according to their employment status, and to examine how these associations vary across genders using the latest Korean National Examination Health and Nutrition Survey data. Logistic regression analyses were performed using employment status—permanent job, temporary job, and unemployed—as predictor variables and health-related variables as the outcome variables. Results indicated that temporary workers and the unemployed have higher odds of poor mental health regardless of gender. On the other hand, only male permanent workers were found to have a higher risk of problematic drinking compared to precarious workers and the unemployed. Meanwhile, only women showed a higher risk of current smoking in the temporary job and unemployed groups compared with permanent employees. Regarding general health, women, not men, in the temporary job group reported poorer general health (i.e., low health-related quality of life and higher self-perceived poor health) than those in other groups. These findings suggest that the development and implementation of intervention services, as well as organizational actions, need to consider differential impacts of unfavorable employment status on health issues according to gender. View Full-Text
Keywords: employment status; health behavior; general health; mental health employment status; health behavior; general health; mental health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, S.J.; Kim, S.Y.; Lee, E.-S.; Park, S. Associations among Employment Status, Health Behaviors, and Mental Health in a Representative Sample of South Koreans. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072456

AMA Style

Park SJ, Kim SY, Lee E-S, Park S. Associations among Employment Status, Health Behaviors, and Mental Health in a Representative Sample of South Koreans. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072456

Chicago/Turabian Style

Park, Se J., Soo Y. Kim, Eun-Sun Lee, and Subin Park. 2020. "Associations among Employment Status, Health Behaviors, and Mental Health in a Representative Sample of South Koreans" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072456

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