Special Issue "Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Effects in Food Processing"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Giancarlo Cravotto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Drug Science and Technology, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 9, 10125 Turin, Italy
Interests: green chemistry; process intensification; green extraction; enabling technologies (ultrasound, microwaves, hydrodynamic cavitation, ball milling, flow chemistry); sustainable chemical processes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to present an updated overview of the applications of ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in food processing. Starting with a description of the physical concepts and phenomena behind cavitational effects, shear forces and the microjets generated during sonication and hydrodynamic treatment, the final goal is to provide insight into existing industrial processes that take advantage of these energy sources. An accurate analysis of observed mechanical, physical, chemical and biochemical changes should facilitate process optimization and minimize the risk of food component degradation and the loss of functional and flavoring properties. The wide range of operations that make use of this technology include extraction, emulsification, solid dispersion, freezing, drying, cutting, degassing/defoaming, thawing, brining, microorganism inactivation, meat tenderization, filtration and crystallization. The huge production volumes found in the food industry require highly efficient, large-scale reactors that are designed for flow processes where turbulence, share and cavitational effects are modelled in numerical simulations. The knowledge presented herein should shed light on the state-of-the-art and promote the smart use of ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in food processing.

Prof. Dr. Giancarlo Cravotto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Ultrasound

  • Hydrodynamic cavitation

  • Food processing and packaging

  • Process intensification

  • Extraction

  • Emulsification

  • Freezing

  • Crystallization

  • Thawing

  • Brining

  • Filtration

  • Drying

  • Dehydration

  • Cutting

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Kinetic Analysis of Stabilizing C-Phycocyanin in the Spirulina platensis Extracts from Ultrasonic Process Associated with Effects of Light and Temperature
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1662; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app8091662 - 14 Sep 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1332
Abstract
A kinetic model was developed to reflect the stability of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) from ultrasonic extraction process under different storage conditions. The decrease of C-PC contents was most accelerated at a high temperature of 40 °C along with light illumination, resulting in ca. 60% [...] Read more.
A kinetic model was developed to reflect the stability of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) from ultrasonic extraction process under different storage conditions. The decrease of C-PC contents was most accelerated at a high temperature of 40 °C along with light illumination, resulting in ca. 60% drop of an initial concentration for two months of storage. However, ca. 93% of the initial contents remained at 4 °C without light, which would be a most favorable condition for long-term storage. It was first shown that the decrease of the residual concentrations followed second-order kinetics under light illumination. However, without light, the decrease of the C-PC contents showed first order reaction kinetics, which implies initial C-PC concentrations are important. On the contrary, initial storage temperature seemed to be more influential under light illumination. It was also first revealed that the rate of degrading the C-PC was faster with light than without light even at the same temperature, having 0.0108 (1/h) and 0.0138 (1/h) of rate constants of first order (no light) and second order kinetics (with light) at 40 °C, respectively. Moreover, the cleavage of C-PC was also found to follow the Arrhenius relationship. Therefore, this work could provide desirable storage conditions of C-PC from non-thermal ultrasonic process for long-term storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Effects in Food Processing)
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Article
Development of a Combined Trifluoroacetic Acid Hydrolysis and HPLC-ELSD Method to Identify and Quantify Inulin Recovered from Jerusalem artichoke Assisted by Ultrasound Extraction
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(5), 710; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app8050710 - 03 May 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2520
Abstract
Over the last years, inulin, a fructan mixture consisting of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, has attracted more and more attention from both food industry and researchers, due to its unique functional properties as a natural resource. Therefore, there is an increased interest in the [...] Read more.
Over the last years, inulin, a fructan mixture consisting of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, has attracted more and more attention from both food industry and researchers, due to its unique functional properties as a natural resource. Therefore, there is an increased interest in the extraction and quantification of inulin for its valorization from inulin rich plants, wastes and by-products. In this work, ultrasonic treatment was applied for inulin extraction, observing a great impact of extraction temperature and ultrasonic power on the inulin content in the obtained extracts. A combined process including trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)-assisted hydrolysis and analysis with high performance liquid chromatography equipped with evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) was developed to quantify inulin content. The effect of hydrolysis parameters was investigated, obtaining the optimal conditions after using TFA at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, hydrolysis temperature of 90 °C, and hydrolysis duration of 60 min. The good linearity (>0.995), precision, recovery (100.27%), and stability obtained during the validation process showed that this developed method allows the quantification of total inulin content in the samples analyzed. This combined method may also contribute to the investigation of the functional properties of inulin (e.g., as prebiotic). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Effects in Food Processing)
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Article
Enhancement of Neuroprotective Effects of Spirulina platensis Extract from a High-Pressure Homogenization Process
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 634; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app8040634 - 19 Apr 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
This study is the first to show that a simple high-pressure homogenization process (HP) could extract very heat-sensitive chlorophyll from a marine alga, Spirulina platensis. Up to 9.85 mg/g was produced at an optimal input pressure of 650 bar with a shear [...] Read more.
This study is the first to show that a simple high-pressure homogenization process (HP) could extract very heat-sensitive chlorophyll from a marine alga, Spirulina platensis. Up to 9.85 mg/g was produced at an optimal input pressure of 650 bar with a shear stress of approximately 20,000 (1/s) compared to 5.27 mg/g from conventional 70% ethanol extraction (EE) at 40 °C for 24 h. However, a higher input pressure did not increase the extraction yield and in fact decreased it, possibly due to the destruction of chlorophyll a at a high shear stress of approximately 50,000 (1/s) under 1370 bar of input pressure. Chlorophyll a and other components of the extract had additive effects, showing higher antioxidant activities of ca. 56% of DPPH radical scavenging activities than 10 μg/mL chlorophyll a alone, which corresponded to the same chlorophyll a content that existed in the extract. It was also confirmed that the high antioxidant activities of the HP extract reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from glutamate-induced HT22 cells, which resulted in increased neuroprotective activity compared to EE and even chlorophyll a alone, in addition to effectively reducing the release of Ca2+ from nerve cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Effects in Food Processing)
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