Special Issue "From Organic Wastes to Bioresources: Toward a Circular Economy"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Laura Delgado-Moreno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIC - Estación Experimental del Zaidín (EEZ), Granada, Spain
Interests: fate of organic contaminant in the environment; chemical methods for measuring bioavailability and their application; sustainable and low-cost bioremediation strategies; biocarbons for purifying contaminated water
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Carlos García Delgado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Autonomous University of Madrid, Av. Francisco Tomás y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: bioremediation; white rot fungi; organic pollutants; pesticides; antibiotics; soil chemistry; soil biology; organic amendments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic wastes are produced in large amounts worldwide. Considering the growing world population, increased urbanization rates and the consumer behavior of industrialized societies, in the near future, a significant increment is expected in the volume of organic wastes generated by society. Since landfill of these wastes poses significant environmental and economic threats, such as greenhouse gas emission, leaching of pollutants, loss of habitats, and human health risks, scientific, political, and social efforts are concentrated in reusing, recycling or energetically revalorizing these biodegradable organic wastes. The 3R (reduce, recycle and reuse) paradigm is the base of the circular economy model promoted for the achievement of a sustainable development of modern societies. The alternatives of organic waste management offering more economical and environmental advantages would be those related to the transformation of organic wastes or the recovery of some of its components to be utilized in the production of energy, chemicals or materials that can be used in the industrial, agricultural, and environmental sectors adding value to the organic wastes beyond the cost of the energy needed to process its transformation. In addition, the employment of organic waste-based materials in bioremediation technologies has gained an increasing scientific interest, since it represents a low-cost and environmentally friendly strategy.

In this context, this Special Issue aims to bring together studies that deal with processes to transform organic wastes into something useful: energy, chemicals or materials that can be used, among others, in industrial processes, agriculture or environmental remediation strategies. It is open to both original research articles and review articles covering all the relevant progress in these fields (though is not limited to the following):

  • Waste treatment technologies for energy recovery such as biogas and biodiesel;
  • Waste to energy industry: state of the art;
  • Agricultural re-use of organic wastes: composting and biostimulant production;
  • Environmental remediation strategies based on raw or transformed organic wastes;

Biomaterials and green nanoparticles from organic wastes for medical, environmental remediation and agricultural applications.

Dr. Laura Delgado-Moreno
Dr. Carlos García Delgado
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Reuse of Pruning Waste from Subtropical Fruit Trees and Urban Gardens as a Source of Nutrients: Changes in the Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties of the Soil
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 193; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app12010193 - 25 Dec 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
A field experiment was conducted on the Andalusian coast (Granada, Southern Spain) to study the time course of nutrient release into the soil after the addition of bagged pruning waste from subtropical orchard trees (avocado, cherimoya, and mango) and urban garden waste over [...] Read more.
A field experiment was conducted on the Andalusian coast (Granada, Southern Spain) to study the time course of nutrient release into the soil after the addition of bagged pruning waste from subtropical orchard trees (avocado, cherimoya, and mango) and urban garden waste over three two-year periods. N, P, and K concentrations were greater in the garden waste, whilst avocado and cherimoya pruning waste registered the highest values for Mg. In general, micronutrient contents were low in all waste, especially Cu. Macronutrient release followed a three-phase dynamic: fast initial release, intermediate stabilization, and final increase. Garden waste showed a similar time course in all three trees and released greater concentrations of K and P. The annual decomposition rate factor k was negative for N and Ca in the avocado tree, indicating strong biological activity in this plot. Avocado, cherimoya, and garden waste showed a good microbial degradation, improving soil quality by increasing carbon and nitrogen contents as well as soil microbial activity. As for the mango tree, its special microclimatic conditions appeared to favor waste photodegradation, thus eliminating nutrients that were not incorporated into the soil. Soil enzymatic activities increased in the avocado and cherimoya trees with the addition of all waste. In the mango tree, only an increase in urease was detected after the addition of garden waste. Our results suggest that the time course of organic waste in different subtropical trees grown on similar soils is significantly conditioned by the microclimatic characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Organic Wastes to Bioresources: Toward a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Phosphorus Dynamics in the Soil–Plant–Environment Relationship in Cropping Systems: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(23), 11133; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app112311133 - 24 Nov 2021
Viewed by 353
Abstract
This work performs a review of the relevant aspects of agronomic dynamics of phosphorus (P) in the soil–plant relationship as a community (crop ecophysiology), the effect of environmental conditions and global warming on the redistribution and translocation of P in some crop, and [...] Read more.
This work performs a review of the relevant aspects of agronomic dynamics of phosphorus (P) in the soil–plant relationship as a community (crop ecophysiology), the effect of environmental conditions and global warming on the redistribution and translocation of P in some crop, and the use of good agricultural practices with the aim of improving the efficiency of the element. The research focuses on Northern Europe, North-Eastern Asia, Oceania, North America, and the tropical area of Latin America. This review covers general research and specific works on P found in the literature, 70% of which date from the last 10 years, as well as some older studies that have been of great relevance as references and starting points for more recent investigations. The dynamics of P in a system implies taking into account genetic aspects of the plant, component of the soil–plant–fertilizer–environment relationship, and use of technologies at the molecular level. In addition, in a climate change scenario, the availability of this element can significantly change depending on whether it is labile or non-labile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Organic Wastes to Bioresources: Toward a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop