Physical, Psychological and Social Health in Childhood: The Role of Health Determinants

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2025 | Viewed by 2845

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery and Pathology, Occupational Therapy, Miguel Hernandez University, 03550 Alicante, Spain
Interests: child and adolescent health; neuropsychology development; community health; sensory reactivity; obesity; psychometrics; occupational therapy; environmental factors; daily activity living; nutritional epidemiology; social factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgery and Pathology, Occupational Therapy, Miguel Hernandez University, 03550 Alicante, Spain
Interests: development, adaptation and validadtion of assessment tools; evidence-based healthcare practice; health determinants; occupation-based health promotion; occupation based epidemiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A comprehensive understanding of the determinants affecting the physical, psychological, and social dimensions of childhood is imperative for the promotion of lifelong well-being and optimal health outcomes. By conducting an accurate assessment of these factors, we can augment our insights, providing a more robust foundation for the development of evidence-based strategies and policies aimed at fostering the holistic health of children.

The forthcoming Special Issue is dedicated to describing the magnitude of changes in children's health, encompassing obesity, adiposity, cardiometabolic risk, sensory reactivity, coordination disorders, emotional and behavioral problems, mental and psychomotor problems, and other factors that affect their well-being. Additionally, we seek to compile papers that examine the influence of environmental factors on physical, mental, or social health outcomes. We extend our invitation to the submission of diverse types of manuscripts, such as original research articles and reviews (scoping reviews, systematic reviews, and/or meta-analyses). Furthermore, diverse methodological and theoretical approaches are also welcome to be submitted.

Dr. Eva Maria Navarrete-Munoz
Dr. Desirée Valera-Gran
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensory reactivity
  • cardiometabolic factors
  • neuropsychological development
  • neurodevelopmental disorders
  • mental health
  • well-being
  • emotional and behavioral problems
  • nutritional factors
  • contextual factors
  • physical activity
  • parental determinants
  • social problems and factors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 737 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Food Insecurity, Self-Efficacy, and Changes in Body Mass Index among the Youth in Taiwan: Analysis from a Longitudinal Cohort Survey
by Ya-Chi Huang, Chin Xuan Tan, Chih-Ting Lee and Meng-Che Tsai
Children 2024, 11(6), 663; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060663 - 29 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Food insecurity is a heightened concern among economically disadvantaged youth, and it may contribute to the atypical body mass index (BMI) patterns frequently observed in this group. Self-efficacy seems to intervene in the negative impacts of contextual restraints. This study investigated the [...] Read more.
Background: Food insecurity is a heightened concern among economically disadvantaged youth, and it may contribute to the atypical body mass index (BMI) patterns frequently observed in this group. Self-efficacy seems to intervene in the negative impacts of contextual restraints. This study investigated the relationship between food insecurity, self-efficacy, and BMI trajectory among economically disadvantaged Taiwanese youth. Methods: We utilized three-wave longitudinal data from the Taiwan Database of Children and Youth in Poverty. The Food Insecurity Score (FIS) assessed food insecurity with a 4-item scale measuring reduced meal frequency, hunger, skipping meals, and economic constraints. Moreover, the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) assessed self-efficacy, showcasing the ability to handle stress effectively and envision success scenarios, contributing to positive outcomes. By employing latent growth modeling, we were able to delineate the impacts of baseline food insecurity and self-efficacy on initial BMI and its subsequent growth trajectory. Results: Elevated baseline FIS significantly predicted higher initial BMI (coefficient = 0.420, p = 0.042). Baseline GSES was negatively associated with initial BMI (coefficient = −0.093, p < 0.001) but positively predicted the BMI growth rate (coefficient = 0.023, p = 0.011). Conclusion: Enhancing self-efficacy may be an effective multidisciplinary intervention to address psychosocial and socioeconomic factors when tackling weight problems in vulnerable youth groups. Full article
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13 pages, 1138 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Impact of Socioeconomic Factors on Early Childhood Development in Marginalised Roma Communities: The Role of Parental Education and Household Equipment
by Jana Plavnicka, Shoshana Chovan and Daniela Filakovska Bobakova
Children 2024, 11(6), 622; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060622 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 352
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the effect of socioeconomic disadvantage accumulated in marginalised Roma communities (MRCs) on early childhood development and to assess the role of selected socioeconomic indicators in the association between belonging to MRCs vs. the majority and early childhood development. [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore the effect of socioeconomic disadvantage accumulated in marginalised Roma communities (MRCs) on early childhood development and to assess the role of selected socioeconomic indicators in the association between belonging to MRCs vs. the majority and early childhood development. We obtained cross-sectional data from 232 mother–child dyads from MRCs and the majority population. The differences in early childhood development and background variables between the two groups were tested using chi-square and Mann–Whitney U tests. The moderated mediation was tested using PROCESS Macro in SPSS Model 14 on 5000 bootstrap samples. Statistically significant differences between children from MRCs and the majority were found in terms of maternal age, parental education, household equipment, as well as early childhood development. Household equipment moderated the indirect effect of being from MRCs vs. the majority on early childhood development through parental education. The indirect effect through parental education was high at a low household equipment level, reduced at an average level and non-significant at a high level of household equipment. Our study uncovered disparities in early childhood development between children from MRCs and the majority population. Parental education significantly influenced developmental outcomes, while household equipment mitigated its impact. Full article
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10 pages, 498 KiB  
Article
Participation as a Predictor of Quality of Life among Japanese Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders Analyzed Using a Machine Learning Algorithm
by Hiroyasu Shiozu, Daisuke Kimura, Ryoichiro Iwanaga and Shigeki Kurasawa
Children 2024, 11(5), 603; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11050603 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 568
Abstract
Participation is important for children’s quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to identify participation factors that influence QOL among Japanese children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Ninety-two Japanese parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders participated in this study. The parents completed the parent version [...] Read more.
Participation is important for children’s quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to identify participation factors that influence QOL among Japanese children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Ninety-two Japanese parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders participated in this study. The parents completed the parent version of the Kid- and Kiddo-KINDL health-related QOL questionnaire and the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth. The data were examined using the random forest algorithm to analyze the participation factors that affected the children’s QOL. The analyses revealed that school and community environmental factors that affected participation were the most important predictors of QOL among children. As school and community environments can significantly impact the QOL of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, greater focus should be placed on participation in environmental contexts. Full article
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10 pages, 298 KiB  
Article
Participation Strategies of Parents of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders: An Exploratory Study
by Hiroyasu Shiozu, Daisuke Kimura, Ryoichiro Iwanaga and Shigeki Kurasawa
Children 2024, 11(2), 192; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11020192 - 3 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1055
Abstract
Strategies are critical to promote child participation in important life activities. This study analyzed the participation strategies of the parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Ninety-two Japanese elementary children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents were recruited. The parents completed the Participation and [...] Read more.
Strategies are critical to promote child participation in important life activities. This study analyzed the participation strategies of the parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Ninety-two Japanese elementary children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents were recruited. The parents completed the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY) questionnaire. Strategy text data obtained from the PEM-CY were analyzed with the co-occurrence network and correspondence analyses. The co-occurrence network analysis showed that the commonality of strategies to enable participation at home, school, and community settings was able to explain the child’s characteristics when involved in each setting. The correspondence analysis also suggested the need for specific strategies in each setting. The importance of strategies to improve the attitudinal environment and promote the participation of children with neurodevelopmental disorders was evident. Reducing stigma is important in all environments, especially in the public sphere. In addition, specific strategies are needed in each setting, suggesting the importance of context-specific approaches. Full article
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