Special Issue "Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Restorative Dentistry and Traumatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 8818

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kristina Gorseta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: paediatric dentistry; restorative dentistry; dental materials; esthetic dentistry; oral diseases; dental traumatology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral health is an integral part of general health and enables people to live without discomfort or embarrassment. Early childhood is a key period in the construction of healthy life habits that affect oral health. Early childhood caries is a significant public health problem that can be found throughout the general population. Worldwide children continue to have a high rate of dental disease, and this burden of illness is mostly represented by children in low-income families and socially disantvantaged families. There is sound evidence that preventive dental visits improve oral health and reduce later costs, and good evidence that fluoridation therapy and fissure sealants decreases the rate of dental caries, particularly in high-risk populations. Untreated carious lesions commonly lead to a poor quality of life with functional, aesthetic, and psychological problems. Paediatric dentists play an important role in identifying children at high risk for dental disease and in advocating for more comprehensive and universal dental care for children. Lifestyle changes during COVID-19 pandemic will have an effect on oral health of parents and their children.

In this Special Issue, papers that explore the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, risk factors, evaluation strategies, treatments, dental trauma and any other aspect of oral health in children are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kristina Gorseta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • child oral health
  • dental caries
  • prevention
  • fluoridation
  • fissure sealing
  • dental trauma

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Article
Molar Incisor Hypomineralization: Awareness among Postdoctoral Dental Residents: A Cross-Sectional Study
Dent. J. 2022, 10(4), 64; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj10040064 - 06 Apr 2022
Viewed by 686
Abstract
Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is the presentation of an enamel defect, where incisors and one (or more) molars are affected. Identifying MIH is significant in restoring its visual defect and avoiding pain or other consequences of this condition. The present cross-sectional study [...] Read more.
Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is the presentation of an enamel defect, where incisors and one (or more) molars are affected. Identifying MIH is significant in restoring its visual defect and avoiding pain or other consequences of this condition. The present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the awareness, ability, and confidence in identifying MIH among postgraduate residents in the state of Nevada. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among postdoctoral dental residents at the School of Dental Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. This cross-sectional study used images of cases of MIH and a survey to collect the data. The survey included demographics, educational background, and basic knowledge of MIH. Results: The response rate to the invitation to participate was 91%. The confidence in identifying MIH was 100%, 50%, and 33.3% for pediatric, orthodontic, and general practice residency (GPR). A total of 70% were aware of this anomaly from their predoctoral dental education and indicated the need for further related education. There was 33% confusion with fluorosis and 16.6% with amelogenesis imperfecta. A total of 66.6% of the participants indicated that they require further education relating to MIH. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present investigation, MIH awareness among the investigated groups varied but was highest amongst the pediatric residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Pediatricians’ Knowledge of Emergency Management of Dental Injuries and Use of Mouthguards: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Dent. J. 2021, 9(12), 152; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9120152 - 15 Dec 2021
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Aim: Dental injuries are one of the most frequent oral health problems in children and adolescents. This study aimed to evaluate Croatian pediatricians’ knowledge and practice regarding dental injuries management and the use of mouthguards as means of protection against traumatic injuries. Materials [...] Read more.
Aim: Dental injuries are one of the most frequent oral health problems in children and adolescents. This study aimed to evaluate Croatian pediatricians’ knowledge and practice regarding dental injuries management and the use of mouthguards as means of protection against traumatic injuries. Materials and methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey conducted among 186 pediatricians examined their demographic characteristics, knowledge and experience with dental injuries. Student t-test or one-way ANOVA, with Tukey’s post-hoc were used to analyze obtained data (p ≤ 0.05). Results: The overall mean score of knowledge on the management of dental injuries was 3.6 ± 1.53 points. Male pediatricians (p = 0.016), those who witnessed dental injuries (p = 0.003), and those who had more than ten years of pediatric practice (p = 0.027) showed better knowledge. The results of multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated impact between pediatricians’ knowledge in the emergency treatment of traumatic dental injuries concerning the level of health care (practice settings) (β = −0.254, p = 0.002) and the number of patients treated by a pediatrician per day (β = −0.187, p = 0.030). Conclusion: Pediatricians have a low level of knowledge regarding the primary care of traumatic dental injuries. An additional course on dental injurie management should be recommended as part of the physician and pediatricians’ educational training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Using a Machine Learning Algorithm to Predict the Likelihood of Presence of Dental Caries among Children Aged 2 to 7
Dent. J. 2021, 9(12), 141; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9120141 - 01 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
Background: Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood infectious disease and is a serious public health problem affecting both developing and industrialized countries, yet it is preventable in most cases. This study evaluated the potential of screening for dental caries among children [...] Read more.
Background: Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood infectious disease and is a serious public health problem affecting both developing and industrialized countries, yet it is preventable in most cases. This study evaluated the potential of screening for dental caries among children using a machine learning algorithm applied to parent perceptions of their child’s oral health assessed by survey. Methods: The sample consisted of 182 parents/caregivers and their children 2–7 years of age living in Los Angeles County. Random forest (a machine learning algorithm) was used to identify survey items that were predictors of active caries and caries experience. We applied a three-fold cross-validation method. A threshold was determined by maximizing the sum of sensitivity and specificity conditional on the sensitivity of at least 70%. The importance of survey items to classifying active caries and caries experience was measured using mean decreased Gini (MDG) and mean decreased accuracy (MDA) coefficients. Results: Survey items that were strong predictors of active caries included parent’s age (MDG = 0.84; MDA = 1.97), unmet needs (MDG = 0.71; MDA = 2.06) and the child being African American (MDG = 0.38; MDA = 1.92). Survey items that were strong predictors of caries experience included parent’s age (MDG = 2.97; MDA = 4.74), child had an oral health problem in the past 12 months (MDG = 2.20; MDA = 4.04) and child had a tooth that hurt (MDG = 1.65; MDA = 3.84). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate the potential of screening for active caries and caries experience among children using surveys answered by their parents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
36 Months’ Clinical Performance of Primary Incisors Restorations Depending on the Type of Restorative Technique Used: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Dent. J. 2021, 9(11), 126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9110126 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 639
Abstract
Background: Depending on the stage of the disease and the child’s age, different types of interventions can be used to treat early childhood caries. As a result, there is not enough clinical evidence to show that one kind of restoration is better than [...] Read more.
Background: Depending on the stage of the disease and the child’s age, different types of interventions can be used to treat early childhood caries. As a result, there is not enough clinical evidence to show that one kind of restoration is better than another. The objective of this longitudinal study was to compare the results of 36 months of clinical performance of primary incisors restorations using an incremental layering technique with the ceram.x® SphereTECTM nanoceramic composite (Dentsply) or a full coverage technique with transparent strip crowns (Frasaco GmbH) with the same composite in children with or without biological caries risk factors. Methods: 80 patients (females 42/52.5%) were included in the study. A total of 160 restorations were performed. Restorations were evaluated at baseline and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months, according to modified Ryge criteria. Conclusion: Restorations with both techniques were clinically highly successful and showed similar clinical performance at postoperatively regardless of the presence of biological factors of caries risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Comparison of Different Methods of Education in the Adoption of Oral Health Care Knowledge
Dent. J. 2021, 9(10), 111; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9100111 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 738
Abstract
Aim: The scope of this study was to determine if there is a critical distinction in the usage of lectures, videos, and pamphlets as educational material utilized in the adoption of oral health care knowledge. Materials and methods: Three-hundred and thirty children from [...] Read more.
Aim: The scope of this study was to determine if there is a critical distinction in the usage of lectures, videos, and pamphlets as educational material utilized in the adoption of oral health care knowledge. Materials and methods: Three-hundred and thirty children from ages 11 to 13 from the city of Split, Croatia completed the questionnaire on oral health care knowledge. Consequently, they were educated by randomly using a method: lecture, pamphlet, or video. Finally, after education, their knowledge was tested again. Results: Different statistical tests were used for comparison of different sets of data. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant difference (p ˂ 0.001) compared to the results before and after education. The Kruskal–Wallis test comparing knowledge outcomes after three different types of education: video, lecture, and pamphlet, showed a statistically significant difference in the final knowledge between groups (p ˂ 0.05). A pairwise comparison between different types of education showed a significant statistical difference between education conducted by pamphlet and video material (p = 0.003) and pamphlet and lecture (p = 0.006). No difference was observed between the level of knowledge acquired through video material education and lectures (p = 0.928). Conclusion: Videos and lectures as means of education showed equal effectiveness in the adoption of oral health care knowledge, while the pamphlet was a method that proved to be less effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Behavior of Children during Dental Care with Rubber Dam Isolation: A Randomized Controlled Study
Dent. J. 2021, 9(8), 89; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9080089 - 04 Aug 2021
Viewed by 990
Abstract
Background: The establishment of the dental dam improves dentist working conditions and patient protection. The purpose of this study was to analyze the behavior of the child during dental care with or without a dam. Methods: In this interventional randomized study, 51 patients [...] Read more.
Background: The establishment of the dental dam improves dentist working conditions and patient protection. The purpose of this study was to analyze the behavior of the child during dental care with or without a dam. Methods: In this interventional randomized study, 51 patients are divided into two groups, one with a rubber dam and the other with cotton roll isolation. Their behavior was observed during the treatment of temporary molars. The duration of the treatment, the patient’s feeling with a visual analogue scale (VAS), the behavior (B) of the child measured with a hetero-evaluation scale (modified Venham scale) and the cardiac frequency (CF) were measured. Results: The group treated with a rubber dam has a significant decrease in the various stress parameters that have been identified (B, p value = 0.034; CF, p value = 0.015). Subgroups of patients with and without nitrous oxide sedation were compared and similar results were obtained. Conclusions: Isolation with a rubber dam reduces child’s stress during dental care. Although it is slightly more time-consuming and training is necessary for a quick and effective placement, it allows dentists to perform dental care in the best possible conditions, while reducing dental anxiety in young patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children with Intellectual Disabilities
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9020021 - 11 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1059
Abstract
The aim of the study is to compare the frequency and the distribution of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Seventy-two children with intellectual disabilities and 72 healthy children were included in the study. They ranged in age from [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to compare the frequency and the distribution of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Seventy-two children with intellectual disabilities and 72 healthy children were included in the study. They ranged in age from 5 to 18 years with the same distribution by age and sex. Standard clinical examination was performed, at a dental clinic or in the institution where the children lived, by using a dental mirror and a probe, according the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry judgment criteria for MIH. Results: Among the 72 children with intellectual disabilities, eight children (11.1%) presented MIH with 19 affected teeth. In the control group, one child (1.4%) presented MIH with two affected teeth. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.033). There were no statistically significant differences between boys and girls. The molars, especially the first right molars were the most affected tooth. Brown defects were less common than white defects. Conclusion: Children with MIH should be identified because this condition is a common problem in children with intellectual disabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Management of Dental Avulsion Injuries: A Survey of Dental Support Staff in Cairns, Australia
Dent. J. 2021, 9(1), 4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9010004 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2182
Abstract
Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental support staff in providing appropriate first-aid advice regarding dental avulsion emergencies. Methods: This study was reported according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines for [...] Read more.
Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental support staff in providing appropriate first-aid advice regarding dental avulsion emergencies. Methods: This study was reported according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines for cross-sectional studies. Dental support staff (includes dental assistants, administrative staff and other non-clinical staff) were contacted and data were collected from 50 private dental clinics across the Greater Cairns Area, Queensland, Australia. These data were collected through an online survey throughout 2020. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s Chi-squared test was used to analyze the data and any associations between categorical outcomes. Results: This survey yielded a response rate of 34.1% with a margin of error of 10.3%. More than four-tenths of participants (42%) reported that they had received some form of dental avulsion management training previously. All but five participants (92%) denoted that they would immediately replant an avulsed permanent tooth. More than half of all participants would choose to rinse a soiled avulsed tooth with fresh milk (55%) and transport that tooth in fresh milk (65%) should they not be able to replant the tooth at the site. Almost nine in every ten participants (85%) expressed willingness to further their training in this area. Knowledge in replanting avulsed permanent teeth was found to be significantly impacted by gender, age, years of experience and participation in formal avulsion training. Male participants were found to be significantly more likely (p = 0.025) to replant a permanent avulsed tooth than their female counterparts. Participants who were 40 years of age and above were found to be significantly more likely to choose fresh milk to transport avulsed teeth (p = 0.0478). Older participants (p = 0.0021), alongside those who had greater years of experience (p = 0.0112) and those who had undertaken formal avulsion training (p = 0.0106) were all significantly more likely to express greater confidence in their ability to manage dental avulsion injuries. Participants who had previously received some form of education regarding avulsion injury management were also most likely to warrant further education and training in this area (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that dental support staff in the Greater Cairns Area seem to have a fair grasp of first-aid knowledge regarding the management of dental avulsion injuries. This result indicates that this knowledge has been picked up through years of experience, rather than a formal education. Despite this, one would expect people who work in the dental industry to be able to provide accurate and appropriate assistance during dental emergencies, hence, further training is warranted to ensure optimum patient outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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