Special Issue "Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Restorative Dentistry and Traumatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kristina Gorseta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: paediatric dentistry; restorative dentistry; dental materials; esthetic dentistry; oral diseases; dental traumatology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral health is an integral part of general health and enables people to live without discomfort or embarrassment. Early childhood is a key period in the construction of healthy life habits that affect oral health. Early childhood caries is a significant public health problem that can be found throughout the general population. Worldwide children continue to have a high rate of dental disease, and this burden of illness is mostly represented by children in low-income families and socially disantvantaged families. There is sound evidence that preventive dental visits improve oral health and reduce later costs, and good evidence that fluoridation therapy and fissure sealants decreases the rate of dental caries, particularly in high-risk populations. Untreated carious lesions commonly lead to a poor quality of life with functional, aesthetic, and psychological problems. Paediatric dentists play an important role in identifying children at high risk for dental disease and in advocating for more comprehensive and universal dental care for children. Lifestyle changes during COVID-19 pandemic will have an effect on oral health of parents and their children.

In this Special Issue, papers that explore the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, risk factors, evaluation strategies, treatments, dental trauma and any other aspect of oral health in children are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kristina Gorseta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • child oral health
  • dental caries
  • prevention
  • fluoridation
  • fissure sealing
  • dental trauma

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children with Intellectual Disabilities
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9020021 - 11 Feb 2021
Viewed by 425
Abstract
The aim of the study is to compare the frequency and the distribution of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Seventy-two children with intellectual disabilities and 72 healthy children were included in the study. They ranged in age from [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to compare the frequency and the distribution of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Seventy-two children with intellectual disabilities and 72 healthy children were included in the study. They ranged in age from 5 to 18 years with the same distribution by age and sex. Standard clinical examination was performed, at a dental clinic or in the institution where the children lived, by using a dental mirror and a probe, according the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry judgment criteria for MIH. Results: Among the 72 children with intellectual disabilities, eight children (11.1%) presented MIH with 19 affected teeth. In the control group, one child (1.4%) presented MIH with two affected teeth. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.033). There were no statistically significant differences between boys and girls. The molars, especially the first right molars were the most affected tooth. Brown defects were less common than white defects. Conclusion: Children with MIH should be identified because this condition is a common problem in children with intellectual disabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Management of Dental Avulsion Injuries: A Survey of Dental Support Staff in Cairns, Australia
Dent. J. 2021, 9(1), 4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9010004 - 30 Dec 2020
Viewed by 861
Abstract
Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental support staff in providing appropriate first-aid advice regarding dental avulsion emergencies. Methods: This study was reported according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines for [...] Read more.
Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental support staff in providing appropriate first-aid advice regarding dental avulsion emergencies. Methods: This study was reported according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines for cross-sectional studies. Dental support staff (includes dental assistants, administrative staff and other non-clinical staff) were contacted and data were collected from 50 private dental clinics across the Greater Cairns Area, Queensland, Australia. These data were collected through an online survey throughout 2020. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s Chi-squared test was used to analyze the data and any associations between categorical outcomes. Results: This survey yielded a response rate of 34.1% with a margin of error of 10.3%. More than four-tenths of participants (42%) reported that they had received some form of dental avulsion management training previously. All but five participants (92%) denoted that they would immediately replant an avulsed permanent tooth. More than half of all participants would choose to rinse a soiled avulsed tooth with fresh milk (55%) and transport that tooth in fresh milk (65%) should they not be able to replant the tooth at the site. Almost nine in every ten participants (85%) expressed willingness to further their training in this area. Knowledge in replanting avulsed permanent teeth was found to be significantly impacted by gender, age, years of experience and participation in formal avulsion training. Male participants were found to be significantly more likely (p = 0.025) to replant a permanent avulsed tooth than their female counterparts. Participants who were 40 years of age and above were found to be significantly more likely to choose fresh milk to transport avulsed teeth (p = 0.0478). Older participants (p = 0.0021), alongside those who had greater years of experience (p = 0.0112) and those who had undertaken formal avulsion training (p = 0.0106) were all significantly more likely to express greater confidence in their ability to manage dental avulsion injuries. Participants who had previously received some form of education regarding avulsion injury management were also most likely to warrant further education and training in this area (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that dental support staff in the Greater Cairns Area seem to have a fair grasp of first-aid knowledge regarding the management of dental avulsion injuries. This result indicates that this knowledge has been picked up through years of experience, rather than a formal education. Despite this, one would expect people who work in the dental industry to be able to provide accurate and appropriate assistance during dental emergencies, hence, further training is warranted to ensure optimum patient outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Care in Paediatric Dentistry)
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