Special Issue "Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health"

A special issue of Endocrines (ISSN 2673-396X). This special issue belongs to the section "Female Reproductive System and Pregnancy Endocrinology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Osamu Hiraike
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: pathophysiology of the human reproduction and ovary; reproductive endocrinology; benign gynecological tumors; minimally invasive gynecological surgery and endoscopy; repair of pelvic floor; breast cancer; endometrial cancer
Prof. Dr. Akira Iwase
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi 371-8511, Japan
Interests: endometriosis; reproductive endocrinology; ovarian cancer; hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Endometriosis is a disease that could affect women of reproductive age. It often manifests within the ovarian endometrioma, and the endometriotic lesions are mainly found in the pelvis, though extra pelvic lesions can appear. Endometriosis is considered to be an important disease that causes infertility and dysmenorrhea, and it has recently been noted that endometriosis significantly worsens quality of life (QOL) and adversely affects labor productivity. The pathophysiological cause of endometriosis is yet to be elucidated, but it has been suggested to be associated with the occurrence of dysmenorrhea during post-pubertal periods. In addition, there have been many reports in recent years that the occurrence of endometriosis is associated with pregnancy-related complications including threatened labor and placenta previa, osteoporosis, cancer, and mental disorders. In this Special Issue, we review the current knowledge of diseases associated with endometriosis and describe the future perspectives of clinical and experimental studies.

Prof. Dr. Osamu Hiraike
Prof. Dr. Akira Iwase
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Endometriosis
  • Ovarian reserve
  • Endometrioma
  • Infertility
  • Preconception care
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cancer
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Menopausal transition
  • Mental health
  • QOL
  • Economic loss
  • Complications during pregnancy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Impact of 1.0 mg/Day Dienogest Treatment on Bone Metabolism Markers in Young Women with Dysmenorrhea
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 293-300; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030027 - 26 Aug 2021
Viewed by 771
Abstract
A low dose of dienogest (DNG) 1 mg/day is useful for treating dysmenorrhea in young women. However, the effect of DNG on bone turnover during bone growth and formation, rather than at maturity, is currently unknown even at low doses. We investigated change [...] Read more.
A low dose of dienogest (DNG) 1 mg/day is useful for treating dysmenorrhea in young women. However, the effect of DNG on bone turnover during bone growth and formation, rather than at maturity, is currently unknown even at low doses. We investigated change in bone turnover after 3 months of DNG 1 mg/day. This retrospective cohort study included young women aged 10–24 years with dysmenorrhea and irregular menstruation. Gonadotropins and the bone metabolism markers TRACP-5b and BAP were compared before and at 3 months after administration of DNG 1 mg/day. There were no significant changes in TRACP-5b (before, 455.6 ± 323.6 mU/dL; 3 months after, 462.1 ± 346.1 mU/dL), BAP (before, 24.7 ± 19.0 μg/L; 3 months after, 25.2 ± 22.3 μg/L), or the TRACP-5b/BAP ratio (before, 22.1 ± 7.0; 3 months after, 21.5 ± 6.3). Administration of DNG 1 mg/day had no significant effect on bone turnover after 3 months during the bone-growth phase in young women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)
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Communication
The Effects of Endometriosis on Ovarian Functions
Endocrines 2021, 2(2), 142-149; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2020014 - 03 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
Infertility is a main manifestation of endometriosis, though the exact pathogenesis of endometriosis-associated infertility remains unclear. Compromised ovarian functions may be one of the causes of endometriosis related infertility. The ovarian function can be classified into three basic elements, (1) production of ovarian [...] Read more.
Infertility is a main manifestation of endometriosis, though the exact pathogenesis of endometriosis-associated infertility remains unclear. Compromised ovarian functions may be one of the causes of endometriosis related infertility. The ovarian function can be classified into three basic elements, (1) production of ovarian hormones, (2) maintenance of follicular development until ovulation, and (3) reservoir of dormant oocytes (ovarian reserve). The effects of endometriosis on ovarian hormone production and follicular development are inconclusive. Ovarian endometrioma is common phonotype of endometriosis. Development of endometrioma per se may affect ovarian reserve. Surgery for endometriomas further diminish ovarian reserve, especially women with bilateral involvement. Early intervention with surgery and/or medical treatment may be beneficial, though firm evidence is lacking. When surgery is chosen in women at reproductive age, specific techniques that spare ovarian function should be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)
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Review

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Review
Clinical Aspects of Adolescent Endometriosis
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 301-310; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030028 - 28 Aug 2021
Viewed by 351
Abstract
Early diagnosis and long-term management of endometriosis is important in adolescent girls considering their potential for future pregnancy and need for preventing disease progression. However, symptoms and clinical findings of adolescent endometriosis may differ from those of typical adult endometriosis, making diagnosis difficult. [...] Read more.
Early diagnosis and long-term management of endometriosis is important in adolescent girls considering their potential for future pregnancy and need for preventing disease progression. However, symptoms and clinical findings of adolescent endometriosis may differ from those of typical adult endometriosis, making diagnosis difficult. In adolescents, menstrual pain may present as acyclic and unresponsive to commonly used medication. Typical imaging findings in adult endometriosis, such as ovarian endometriotic cysts and fibrotic scars, are less common in adolescents. Peritoneal lesions, characteristic of early-stage endometriosis, are commonly found in this age group. It should be noted that endometriosis may also be found in adolescents before menarche, because of premenarcheal endometriosis or congenital uterine anomaly and outflow obstruction; the latter requiring surgical correction. Although surgery is reported to be effective for pain, postsurgical recurrence rate is high, and the effect of hormonal treatment is controversial. The optimal timing for surgical intervention also remains to be determined. Here, we aim to identify the unique characteristics of endometriosis in adolescents to achieve early diagnosis and optimal management for this group of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)
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Review
Malignancies Associated with Extraovarian Endometriosis: A Literature Review
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 251-265; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030024 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 432
Abstract
Endometriosis-associated ovarian malignancies have been well documented. Although these malignancies also occur as extraovarian lesions, little is known about them. Thus, this literature review aimed to further explore these rarely experienced tumors. A total of 257 published cases between April 1990 and April [...] Read more.
Endometriosis-associated ovarian malignancies have been well documented. Although these malignancies also occur as extraovarian lesions, little is known about them. Thus, this literature review aimed to further explore these rarely experienced tumors. A total of 257 published cases between April 1990 and April 2020 were found using PubMed, and 212 cases were included in the analysis considering Sampson’s criteria and the history of endometriosis. We classified these cases as follows: intestine, abdominal scar, vagina and vulva, peritoneum and deep endometriosis, urinary tract, uterine cervix, and others. Age of patients, history of endometriosis, types of past hormonal therapy, symptoms, histological types, and treatment were identified. The most common tumor site was the intestine. Endometrioid carcinoma was the dominant histological type. Contrary to the ovary, clear cell carcinoma was rare in extraovarian sites. On the other hand, clear cell carcinoma represented the largest number of abdominal scars. This difference may help us to understand the development of endometriosis-related malignancies. Hormonal treatment was mentioned in 67 cases and estrogen replacement therapy in 33 cases. Although risks of estrogen therapy are still controversial, the highly differentiated histological types and hormone-dependent characteristics of endometriosis-associated malignancy should be considered. Physicians should be careful about estrogen monotherapy after hysterectomy and long-term hormone replacement therapy in patients with a history of endometriosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)

Other

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Case Report
A Case of Elastography-Assisted Laparoscopic Fertility Preservation for Severe Deep Endometriosis Causing Ureteral Stenosis and Subtype II Adenomyosis
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 348-355; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030032 - 09 Sep 2021
Viewed by 411
Abstract
Adenomyosis is commonly treated by total hysterectomy. Adenomyomectomy is considered for women of reproductive age who wish to preserve their fertility. However, a high recurrence rate following adenomyomectomy has been reported because complete removal of the lesion is difficult, and uterine rupture during [...] Read more.
Adenomyosis is commonly treated by total hysterectomy. Adenomyomectomy is considered for women of reproductive age who wish to preserve their fertility. However, a high recurrence rate following adenomyomectomy has been reported because complete removal of the lesion is difficult, and uterine rupture during pregnancy remains a complication. We previously reported that laparoscopic adenomyomectomy using a cold knife prevented thermal damage to the myometrium and elastography to avoid residual lesions. Here, we report the case of a patient who underwent complete resection of a subtype II adenomyosis and resection of deep endometriosis (DE) with the closure of the pouch of Douglas. The patient was 31 years old, had severe dysmenorrhea, and had left ureteral stenosis and subtype II adenomyosis associated with the closure of the pouch of Douglas by the DE. After resection of the DE posterior wall adenomyosis, residual lesions were confirmed by laparoscopic real-time elastography. Eight weeks after surgery, postoperative transvaginal ultrasound showed that the myometrium had shrunk from 28 to 22.7 mm, and the hydronephrosis had disappeared, although a stent remained necessary. In this study, we report the complete resection of subtype II adenomyosis and DE, combined with elastography to visualize the lesions during resection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)
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Case Report
A Feasible Technique in Laparoscopic Excision for Juvenile Cystic Adenomyosis: A Case Report, Literature Review, and Surgical Video
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 284-292; https://doi.org/10.3390/endocrines2030026 - 23 Aug 2021
Viewed by 535
Abstract
Background: Juvenile cystic adenomyosis (JCA) is a rare uterine lesion. We present the case of a young woman who was diagnosed with JCA and subsequently managed with laparoscopic cyst removal with sharp and blunt dissection. Moreover, we provide a literature review and a [...] Read more.
Background: Juvenile cystic adenomyosis (JCA) is a rare uterine lesion. We present the case of a young woman who was diagnosed with JCA and subsequently managed with laparoscopic cyst removal with sharp and blunt dissection. Moreover, we provide a literature review and a surgical video. Case: A 22-year-old nulliparous woman presented with severe dysmenorrhea and was assessed using contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography, transvaginal ultrasonography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, and diagnosed with a cystic lesion on the left side of the myometrium. She underwent laparoscopic cyst excision and uterine reconstruction. Histology was suggestive of JCA. The dysmenorrhea resolved postoperatively. Conclusion: Surgical resection is the first choice of treatment for cystic adenomyosis, and a laparoscopic approach using scissor forceps is effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Endometriosis on Women’s Health)
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