Special Issue "2nd Edition of Oral Diseases and Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Claudia Dellavia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20123 Milan, Italy
Interests: functional anatomy; masticatory muscles; temporomandibular disorders; craniofacial morphology; oral tissue microscopy; oral disease epidemiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The maintenance of general health, well-being and of the overall quality of life recognizes the key role of oral health. Most oral diseases have multiple etiologic and pathogenetic items and present risk factors related to the environment and to the patient lifestyles that interact with genetic heritage.

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the appearance of a wide spectrum of clinical systemic and oral manifestations that suggest different responses of the single patient to the same infective agent. In the oral cavity, alveolar bone pain, mucosal ulcerations, xerostomia, and alteration of the taste perception were reported in patients affected by SARS-CoV-2. Genetic and immune system features may represent predisposing factors to different presentation of oral signs and symptoms in terms of localization, severity, and clinical course. Evaluation of these aspects during the diagnosis and treatment planning together with the development and application of even more precise, non-invasive, and early diagnostic tools is crucial to design patient-centered clinical intervention. Personalized medicine needs to investigate the integration of environmental risk factors with innate variables to set a therapeutic customized program with a multidisciplinary approach.

After the success of the previous Special Issue on “Oral Diseases and Public Health,” we are pleased to invite researchers to contribute to the second Special Issue. Similarly, this Special Issue seeks research papers on the various aspects of the oral diseases management including diagnostic, epidemiologic, therapeutic and maintenance strategies with both basic and clinical research focus. In particular, we encourage the submission of original and review studies assessing how all these factors may impact public health.   

Prof. Dr. Claudia Dellavia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral epidemiology
  • oral health
  • early diagnosis
  • risk factors
  • diagnostic tools
  • oral diseases
  • community dentistry
  • immunology
  • genetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection on ORAL Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9382; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179382 - 06 Sep 2021
Viewed by 443
Abstract
Background: oral lichen planus (OLP) is a mucocutaneous disease that affects about 4% of the global population. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was linked to lichen planus. The current study aimed to assess the impact of OLP associated or not with HCV infection on [...] Read more.
Background: oral lichen planus (OLP) is a mucocutaneous disease that affects about 4% of the global population. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was linked to lichen planus. The current study aimed to assess the impact of OLP associated or not with HCV infection on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Methods: The study included patients diagnosed with OLP who filled in the Romanian version of OHIP-14 questionnaire at their first appointment and 6 months later, after the OLP treatment. A control group of OLP-free subjects similar as age and sex was also included in the study. Results: 68 patients with OLP and 46 controls were included in the study. The OHIP scores are significantly higher on OLP group than controls (p-value < 0.0001) and significantly reduced at 6-month follow-up (p-values: < 0.0001 pre- vs. post-treatment in OLP group). Patients with and without HCV associated with OLP demonstrated a similar oral quality of life (p-values > 0.05). Conclusions: the OHRQoL for patients suffering from OLP is compromised but is improved after treatment. The HCV associated with OLP did not influence the overall OHRQoL, but the patients who associate HCV reported more frequently aching in the mouth and discomfort eating food at six-month follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Oral Diseases and Public Health)
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Article
Self-Esteem and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life within a Cleft Lip and/or Palate Population: A Prospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6078; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116078 - 04 Jun 2021
Viewed by 864
Abstract
(1) Objective: To investigate the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and self-esteem (SE) of a population with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and to compare it with a non-affected control cohort. (2) Materials and methods: This study comprised 91 CLP patients and [...] Read more.
(1) Objective: To investigate the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and self-esteem (SE) of a population with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and to compare it with a non-affected control cohort. (2) Materials and methods: This study comprised 91 CLP patients and a control group of 790 individuals, seeking orthodontic treatment. OHRQoL and SE were assessed by the Child’s Perception Questionnaire (CPQ) and the Dutch adaptation of the Harter’s Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. Treatment need and self-perception of oral aesthetic were assessed using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS). Patients’ expectations and motivation for treatment were also scored. Linear models were used for statistical comparisons between groups. (3) Results: The cleft group scored higher in all domains of the CPQ, OASIS, IOTN and regarding SE for the domains of scholastic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct. The cleft group was not only more motivated and expected less discomfort during treatment but also had higher expectations for the treatment outcome. (4) Conclusions: The OHRQoL of CLP patients is strongly correlated with the presence of an oral cleft, while SE remains a personal resource not influenced by the malocclusion or medical condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Oral Diseases and Public Health)
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