Special Issue "Health Behaviour and Lifestyle"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Thomas E. Dorner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karl-Landsteiner Institute for Health Promotion Research, Gesundheitsplatz 1, 3454 Sitzenberg-Reidling, Austria
Interests: public health; health promotion; disease prevention; lifestyle; physical activity; nutrition; social capital
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Katharina Viktoria Stein
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Social Insurance Fund for Public Service, Railway and Mining Industries, 1080 Vienna, Austria
Karl-Landsteiner Institute for Health Promotion Research, 3454 Sitzenberg-Reidling, Austria
Interests: social determinants of health; health behaviour and morbidity; health promotion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well established that 90% of our health outcomes are determined by factors other than clinical care, and our lifestyle choices play a major role in this.  To be able to make healthy choices, change our health behaviour, and modify our lifestyle requires not only personal motivation but also support from our community and the environment we live in. Whether it is to promote health independently from possible diseases, to stay healthy and prevent disease, avert progression of diseases, or as part of rehabilitation and reablement, health behaviour and lifestyle are crucial levers for success. Actions need to be taken on all levels of the system, from the individual to the policy level; the health workforce needs to partner with individuals and communities to implement changes; and the system needs to build and design an environment, which supports healthy lifestyles and behaviour. They are at the core of a holistic, life course approach to health and wellbeing. Enabling positive health behaviour and lifestyle choices necessitates a health in all policies approach, integrating health, care, education, and infrastructure, to name just the most obvious sectors.

This Special Issue wants to explore these many-faceted aspects and factors influencing health behaviour and lifestyles by looking at (a) research and evidence, (b) good examples and case studies, and (c) policies and structures to support sustainable health behaviour and lifestyle choices.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Dorner
Dr. Katharina Viktoria Stein
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health behaviour and lifestyle
  • Health influencing factors
  • Health literacy
  • Healthy cities and communities
  • Interventions to support behaviour and lifestyle changes
  • Life course approaches, age group-specific approaches
  • Health promoting workplaces
  • Integrated care approaches
  • Nutrition and health diet
  • Physical activity and physical training
  • Health resources and resilience
  • Social capital
  • Combination of different health behaviour measures

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Well-Being at Work: A Cross-Sectional Study on the Portuguese Nutritionists
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7839; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157839 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 423
Abstract
This exploratory, nationwide cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the well-being of Portuguese nutritionists, in addition to outlining their professional and demographic profile. Descriptive analyses were carried out to determine the measures relating to centralising tendency and dispersion of the sample. We compared [...] Read more.
This exploratory, nationwide cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the well-being of Portuguese nutritionists, in addition to outlining their professional and demographic profile. Descriptive analyses were carried out to determine the measures relating to centralising tendency and dispersion of the sample. We compared means and proportions through t-tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The sample size was 206 individuals, respecting a minimum of eight respondents per item to validate the instrument. We recruited Nutritionists from Portugal nationwide using the list of electronic mail provided by the Order of Nutritionists. We sent an electronic mail to all the Nutritionists registered in this Order. We also used messaging applications and social networks (Instagram, Facebook) to reach Nutritionists who were not accessing electronic mail. Most respondents are women (92.5%), young (mean age = 31.4 ± 8.07 years; 54.2% of participants aging under 30 years), single, and with no children. More than half are Catholic (73.8%) and have less than ten years of nutritionist undergraduate completion (55.4%). The only variable that influences well-being at work is the economic variable Household Monthly Income. Those who earn less than €500.00 per month perceive themselves at a lesser state of work well-being than those who earn from €2501.00 to €5000.00 per month. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Behaviour and Lifestyle)
Article
Interactive Effects of Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors on Testicular Function among Healthy Adult Men: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4925; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094925 - 05 May 2021
Viewed by 807
Abstract
Recently, the role of lifestyle factors in testicular function has developed into a growing area of interest. Based on cross-sectional data on 3283 Taiwanese men, we investigated whether interactive effects of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were associated with testicular function. The men were recruited [...] Read more.
Recently, the role of lifestyle factors in testicular function has developed into a growing area of interest. Based on cross-sectional data on 3283 Taiwanese men, we investigated whether interactive effects of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were associated with testicular function. The men were recruited from a private screening institute between 2009 and 2015. Lifestyle behaviors (smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity (PA), sleeping habits, and diet) were obtained by a validated self-reported questionnaire. The men provided a semen sample and had blood drawn for sex hormone measurement. Men who smoked and drank had higher testosterone (T) levels (β = 0.81, p < 0.001) than those who neither smoked nor drank. Men who smoked and had high Western dietary pattern scores had higher T levels—by 0.38 ng/mL (p = 0.03). Those who drank and did not get enough sleep or had high Western dietary pattern scores had elevated T levels—by 0.60 ng/mL (p = 0.005) or 0.45 ng/mL (p = 0.02), respectively. Light PA and insomnia were associated with decreased T levels—by 0.64 ng/mL (p < 0.001). Those who smoked and drank or had light PA or had high Western dietary pattern scores had lower normal sperm morphologies (NSMs)—by 2.08%, 1.77%, and 2.29%, respectively. Moreover, drinkers who had high Western dietary pattern scores had higher sperm concentrations—by 4.63 M/mL (p = 0.04). Awareness and recognition of the long-term impact of lifestyle behaviors and better lifestyle choices may help to optimize the chance of conception amongst couples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Behaviour and Lifestyle)
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