Special Issue "Cancer Health Disparities and Public Health"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ken Batai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Interests: cancer health disparities; kidney cancer; prostate cancer; cancer prevention
Dr. Francine C. Gachupin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Interests: chronic disease; American Indians; cancer health disparity; public health
Dr. Yamilé Molina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607, USA
Interests: Latinx; LGBTQ; rural; breast cancer; cancer health equity; community engagement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer burden varies across various populations, with higher incidence and mortality of specific cancer types in some populations compared to others, resulting from varying degree of interactions between genetic/biologic, behavioral, societal, and environmental risk factors.  Racial/ethnic and gender/sexual, and religious minority groups, rural populations, individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods, and people living in developing nations often have multiple barriers to cancer prevention services (e.g., vaccines), screening, diagnostic care, and treatment.  Structural inequality is a root cause of cancer health disparities. In societies with structural inequality, natural and human-caused crises often pose extra burden to the underserved populations negatively impacting their healthcare access. Patients from underserved populations often experience prejudice in healthcare or clinicians’ bias may negatively affect patient care.  The structural inequality not only affects healthcare access, but also increases behavioral risk factors and environmental and occupational exposures to carcinogens in underserved populations.  Structural racism and other structural factors cause residential segregations, educational attainment, employment, and income disparities, and poor built environment that limits access to safe space for physical activities and availability of an access to nutritious foods.  Cultural values may also affect choice of care and treatment.  Research is necessary to further understand how structural inequality cause cancer disparities to develop policies, recommendations, and clinical practices to reduce cancer disparities and build equity in cancer prevention, treatment, and care.

Dr. Ken Batai
Dr. Francine C. Gachupin
Dr. Yamilé Molina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health disparities
  • Structural racism
  • Health equity
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Socioeconomics
  • Rural health
  • Global health
  • Cancer prevention
  • Cancer treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Health Care Access Measures and Palliative Care Use by Race/Ethnicity among Metastatic Gynecological Cancer Patients in the United States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6040; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116040 - 04 Jun 2021
Viewed by 778
Abstract
Palliative care improves quality-of-life and extends survival, however, is underutilized among gynecological cancer patients in the United States (U.S.). Our objective was to evaluate associations between healthcare access (HCA) measures and palliative care utilization among U.S. gynecological cancer patients overall and by race/ethnicity. [...] Read more.
Palliative care improves quality-of-life and extends survival, however, is underutilized among gynecological cancer patients in the United States (U.S.). Our objective was to evaluate associations between healthcare access (HCA) measures and palliative care utilization among U.S. gynecological cancer patients overall and by race/ethnicity. We used 2004–2016 data from the U.S. National Cancer Database and included patients with metastatic (stage III–IV at-diagnosis) ovarian, cervical, and uterine cancer (n = 176,899). Palliative care was defined as non-curative treatment and could include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and pain management, or any combination. HCA measures included insurance type, area-level socioeconomic measures, distance-to-care, and cancer treatment facility type. We evaluated associations of HCA measures with palliative care use overall and by race/ethnicity using multivariable logistic regression. Our population was mostly non-Hispanic White (72%), had ovarian cancer (72%), and 24% survived <6 months. Five percent of metastatic gynecological cancer patients utilized palliative care. Compared to those with private insurance, uninsured patients with ovarian (aOR: 1.80,95% CI: 1.53–2.12), and cervical (aOR: 1.45,95% CI: 1.26–1.67) cancer were more likely to use palliative care. Patients with ovarian (aOR: 0.58,95% CI: 0.48–0.70) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.74,95% CI: 0.60–0.88) who reside >45 miles from their provider were less likely to utilize palliative care than those within <2 miles. Ovarian cancer patients treated at academic/research programs were less likely to utilize palliative care compared to those treated at community cancer programs (aOR: 0.70, 95%CI: 0.58–0.84). Associations between HCA measures and palliative care utilization were largely consistent across U.S. racial-ethnic groups. Insurance type, cancer treatment facility type, and distance-to-care may influence palliative care use among metastatic gynecological cancer patients in the U.S. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Health Disparities and Public Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop