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Special Issue "Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Roberto Lo Giudice
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Messina University, AOU Policlinico “G.Martino” Via C. Valeria 98100 Messina Italy
Interests: oral surgery; digital dentistry; digital workflow; prosthetic-implant rehabilitation; bone regeneration; hemoconcentrate; growth factors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Fausto Famà
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University Hospital "G. Martino" of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: general surgery; breast and endocrine surgery; minimally invasive surgery; traumatology and innovative surgical techniques development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The digital revolution has changed many habits in every aspect of our personal and professional lives. As doctors, we have been pushed towards a paradigm shift in every aspect of our job, from diagnosis and the clinical approaches to prosthetic manufacturing.

A whole new clinical approach allows the researcher to investigate using new technologies, and to imagine new approaches to screen, follow, and evaluate the progression of different pathologies and clinical problems. Moreover, research on tissue engineering, 3D morphing, 3D scanner, and innovative materials, has made a significant leap forward.

This Special Issue will investigate medicine and dentistry focusing on the use of digital technologies.

This Special Issue of IJERPH welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature.

Dr. Roberto Lo Giudice
Dr. Fausto Famà
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital medicine
  • digital dentistry
  • digital workflow
  • CAD-CAM
  • 3D scanner

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Health Care and Health Service Digital Revolution
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4913; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17144913 - 08 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 676
Abstract
The digital revolution has changed many aspects of the medical profession. Medical doctors and doctors in the dental sciences have been pushed to modify their workflow using new instruments such as decisional software, intraoral and extraoral scanners, and CAD-CAM technologies, which have improved [...] Read more.
The digital revolution has changed many aspects of the medical profession. Medical doctors and doctors in the dental sciences have been pushed to modify their workflow using new instruments such as decisional software, intraoral and extraoral scanners, and CAD-CAM technologies, which have improved diagnostics and the clinical/surgical phase of treatment and follow-up, and nowadays it is clear that medical professional life will continue in the era of digital medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)

Research

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Article
Understanding Patient Needs Regarding Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Smartphone Applications: A Qualitative Insight from Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3862; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18083862 - 07 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 889
Abstract
Background: A pragmatic shift in the healthcare sector characterized by moving from curative to preventive approaches highlights the role of pharmacovigilance in patient safety. There have been few published studies on patient reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Saudi Arabia. This qualitative [...] Read more.
Background: A pragmatic shift in the healthcare sector characterized by moving from curative to preventive approaches highlights the role of pharmacovigilance in patient safety. There have been few published studies on patient reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Saudi Arabia. This qualitative study aims to explore the community opinions and the need for patient-friendly smartphone applications (SPAs) to enhance their participation in ADR reporting. Methods: Purposeful sampling was followed to recruit study participants, a semi-structured interview guide was used to conduct interviews, and the saturation was reached after the 13th interviewer; no new information was obtained after two subsequent interviews. All the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by means of a standard content analysis framework. Results: As per the WHO guidelines, eleven participants were aware of the term “ADR”. All the participants denied receiving any prior education and attending events about ADRs and were unaware of the Saudi FDA-ADR reporting systems. The use of technologies such as SPAs has been widely accepted with a high level of concern for data confidentiality and privacy. Conclusions: These findings point out the need to build patient-oriented educational programs to increase their awareness of ADR reporting and to prioritize the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to be integrated in the Saudi healthcare system to develop future SPAs for improving both patient safety and signal detection of ADRs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)

Other

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Case Report
Orthodontics First in Hemimandibular Hyperplasia. “Mind the Gap”
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7087; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197087 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 655
Abstract
A 32-year-old man was referred to the Division of Orthodontics of the University of Naples “Federico II”, with a 15-year history of gradually increasing right-sided facial asymmetry. Clinical and radiological examinations was consistent to hemimandibular hyperplasia, a rare developmental asymmetry characterized by three-dimensional [...] Read more.
A 32-year-old man was referred to the Division of Orthodontics of the University of Naples “Federico II”, with a 15-year history of gradually increasing right-sided facial asymmetry. Clinical and radiological examinations was consistent to hemimandibular hyperplasia, a rare developmental asymmetry characterized by three-dimensional enlargement of one-half of the mandible. The standard surgical-orthodontic management was proposed to the patient. However, he refused to undergo bimaxillary orthognatic surgery. Therefore, a different treatment was proposed based on the orthodontic technique of pre-surgical decompensation and post-surgical refinement used in bimaxillary orthognatic surgery planning, and surgical intervention with a condylectomy. The dental arches were evenly levelled out with a multi-bracket treatment and then the condylectomy was performed. Orthodontic treatment continued with a levelling and torque control by 0.19 × 0.25 SS arch and physiotherapy. At the three-month follow-up, the patient showed anterior and posterior bite rebalancing, arch intercuspation recovery, and anterior open bite closure due to muscular self-rebalancing. The two-year follow-up showed regular mandibular dynamic, orthodontic appliances were removed, and the patient was instructed to wear retainer for the following months. The final result was aesthetically reasonable for the patient, although slight asymmetry of the chin persisted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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Case Report
The Use of Cone Beam CT(CBCT) in Differentiation of True from Mimicking Eagle’s Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5654; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17165654 - 05 Aug 2020
Viewed by 747
Abstract
Differentiation of true from mimicking Eagle’s syndrome based on conventional radiography is difficult; however, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images can contribute to proper diagnosis of mimicking Eagle’s syndrome. The aim was to study radiological images of a 37-year old female patient (patient [...] Read more.
Differentiation of true from mimicking Eagle’s syndrome based on conventional radiography is difficult; however, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images can contribute to proper diagnosis of mimicking Eagle’s syndrome. The aim was to study radiological images of a 37-year old female patient (patient #1), with chronic cervicofacial pain who underwent radiological diagnosis with a conventional panoramic machine; another 75-year old male patient (patient #2), with chronic oropharyngeal pain, underwent a radiological diagnosis with the CBCT machine, with a field of a view of 16 × 12 cm. Exposure factors were 120 kVp, 7 mA, with a 20 s exposure time of acquisition. The results show a panoramic image (patient #1) with a pathologically elongated styloid process 46 mm of length, which was surgically removed, releasing the patient from further pain episodes. CBCT acquisition (patient #2) showed an impacted left maxillary canine in the edentulous maxilla and a peculiar elongation of both stylohyoid complexes as impressive, “collar-like”, bilateral, elongated, multiple segmented, calcified stylohyoid complexes, without pressure on the vital neurovascular neck structures, mimicking true Eagle’s syndrome. The impacted maxillary canine was surgically extracted with a subsequent resolution of pain episodes and the cessation of neurological complaints. The conclusions suggest that the use of CBCT images can contribute to differentiating mimicking from true Eagle’s syndrome, which has been rarely reported in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care and Health Services Digital Revolution)
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