Special Issue "National and International Community-Based Healthcare and Health Promotion Overcoming COVID-19 Pandemic"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ryuichi Ohta
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Community Care, Unnan City Hospital, Unnan 699-1221, Japan
Interests: public health; health promotion; primary care; family medicine; medical education
Dr. Daisuke Son
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Community-based Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8550, Japan
Interests: primary care; family medicine; medical education; health communication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Community-based health care and health promotion are critical for the sustainability of health conditions all over the world. Health care and promotion should be performed based on sociocultural and socioeconomic status. The present era is intruded on by the COVID-19 pandemic, making the previous health care and health promotion vulnerable because of various limitations of social interaction and strict infection controls. There is a growing demand for innovative methods for health care and health promotion respecting indigenous conditions and infection control at national and international levels that can enable various people to sustain their health conditions. The piling evidence of controlling COVID-19 infection and the introduction of COVID-19 vaccination can drastically change healthcare and health promotion methods. Various innovative and creative health care and promotion methods can be developed and improve health conditions at national and international levels, including Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on providing health care and promotions respecting national and international perspectives through the overcoming the difficulty in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Ryuichi Ohta
Dr. Daisuke Son
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health promotion
  • Health care
  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Infection control
  • National, International

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Communication
Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7113; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137113 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 558
Abstract
(1) Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using a pre-existing video on CPR to support preclinical resuscitation education for medical students; (2) Methods: In total, 129 students selected to learn CPR using a pre-existing YouTube video or the conventional screencast [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using a pre-existing video on CPR to support preclinical resuscitation education for medical students; (2) Methods: In total, 129 students selected to learn CPR using a pre-existing YouTube video or the conventional screencast video by their university faculties. All students responded to the pre- and post-training multiple-choice questionnaire on the basic knowledge of CPR, and, based on their responses, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to assess the comparability of effectiveness across learning modalities. (3) Results: Among the students, 49 (38.0%) students selected the YouTube video to learn about CPR and were treated as the intervention group. The mean pre-test scores and post-test scores of the YouTube and the instructor’s video groups were 6.43 and 6.64, and 9.06 and 9.09, respectively. After controlling for the pre-test score effects, the results of ANCOVA did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.927), indicating comparable performance between groups that used YouTube and the instructor’s videos. (4) Conclusion: Utilizing YouTube videos is a useful teaching strategy for teaching CPR knowledge, which would reduce the burden on faculty of creating screencast lecture videos for online learning on resuscitation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Perception of Threat and Psychological Impact of COVID-19 among Expatriates in Makkah Region, Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6650; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126650 - 21 Jun 2021
Viewed by 436
Abstract
In the first few months of the pandemic, Makkah region reported the highest number of COVID-19 cases among all regions in Saudi Arabia. More than 80% of these reported cases were non-Saudi residents. In this study, we evaluated the perceived threat from and [...] Read more.
In the first few months of the pandemic, Makkah region reported the highest number of COVID-19 cases among all regions in Saudi Arabia. More than 80% of these reported cases were non-Saudi residents. In this study, we evaluated the perceived threat from and psychological impact of COVID-19 among non-Saudi residents of Makkah region. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data collected using a standardized self-report questionnaire. A total of 292 expatriates were included in the study, the majority of whom were non-Arabic speakers. The prevalence of self-reported depression was nearly 40%, anxiety was 32%, and stress was 43%. The findings indicated variability in the prevalence of psychological symptoms among expatriates from different ethnic backgrounds. Additionally, work environment and perceived threat were strong predictors of psychological disorders. This suggested that the perceived threat from and psychological burden of COVID-19 among non-Saudis in Makkah region is substantial. Future research should investigate the reasons behind these variations in the psychological impact of the pandemic among different ethnic groups. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop