Special Issue "Patient-Based Dentistry: Personalized Therapy and Prevention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gianna Maria Nardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Sciences, “Sapienza” University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: oral and dental hygiene; clinical personalized protocols; preventive medicine and oral health
Prof. Dr. Roberto Felice Grassi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Basic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Neuroscience & Sense Organs, University of Bari- "Aldo Moro" Bari, Italy
Interests: prosthetics; esthetic dentistry; implant dentistry; dental implantology; periodontology oral surgery; restorative dentistry; fixed prosthodontics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Some of the best advancements in medicine include artificial intelligence, data analysis and its management, molecular diagnostics, human genome sequencing, oral microbiome, and biology systems. These innovations are mainly aimed at developing a new breed of clinical methodologies towards treatment improvements while minimizing adverse events. Through these improvements, we can also enhance targeted therapies in oral hygiene and medicine and oral surgery . Customizable and individual procedures in oral hygiene are intended for the prevention and treatment of gingivitis, periodontitis, and peri-implantitis with a patient-based approach.

Personalized dentistry is an approach to both preventive care and therapeutic strategy, and both dental hygienists and dentists in this research scenario play a central role. Dental professionals are sentinel of oral health status, as they can observe the health and disease of the oral cavity, with particular attention to mineralized and soft tissues, making sure to identify the risk factors deriving from incorrect lifestyles and systemic diseases. “One size does not fit all” is the paradigm of personalized medicine—our patients are not all the same. Research efforts are heading toward tailoring medical treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient.

The understanding of oral microbiome composition shows that its variation can be predictive of both health and disease. A deeper understanding of oral microbiome taxonomy can change our attitude toward antibiotics prescription and use, especially when their overuse leads to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant species. Most disorders are multifactorial, with epigenetic and multiple genetic, lifestyle, and environmental risk factors that play a role in the clinical manifestation of the disease. These diseases include civilization diseases inter alia diabetes, permanent inflammatory conditions, cancer, and hypertension and all have different oral health aspects. In this clinical scenario, it becomes clear that “one size does not fit all”, when speaking about the therapy strategies. Patient-based medicine needs to identify robust biomarkers of the different clinical conditions to stratify the endotypes of the disease.

This Special Issue does not place specific restrictions on research to allow all topics relating to personalized medicine in the field of dentistry to be accepted.

Prof. Dr. Gianna Maria Nardi
Prof. Dr. Roberto Felice Grassi

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • personalized dentistry
  • oral health
  • oral hygiene
  • patient-based procedures
  • personalized medicine
  • prevention
  • gingivitis
  • periodontitis
  • perio-implantitis
  • new technology
  • minimally invasive dentistry
  • oral rehabilitation
  • oral surgery
  • systemic diseases
  • inflammatory diseases

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Analysis of Instagram® Posts Referring to Cleft Lip
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7404; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17207404 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 821
Abstract
Background: Social media has become a source of medical information. Cleft lip and palate is a visible congenital anomaly. The aim of the study was to analyze Instagram® posts on the topic of cleft lip. Methods: Instagram® posts with [...] Read more.
Background: Social media has become a source of medical information. Cleft lip and palate is a visible congenital anomaly. The aim of the study was to analyze Instagram® posts on the topic of cleft lip. Methods: Instagram® posts with “#cleftlip” from March 2014–March 2017 were accessed. Separate lists of expressions (hashtags, meaningful words, words with emojis or emojis alone) were prepared for primary posts and for replies. Thirty expressions statistically most frequent in primary versus secondary posts and 30 in secondary versus primary posts were identified (Group 1) as well as 30 English words or hashtags (Group 2), non-English words or hashtags (Group 3) and emojis (Group 4). The frequencies of expressions were compared (Z-test for the difference of two population proportions). Results: There were 34,129 posts, (5427 primary posts and 28,702 replies), containing 62,163 expressions, (35,004 in primary posts). The occurrence of all expressions was 454,162, (225,418 in primary posts and 228,744 in replies). Posts with positive expressions such as “beautiful”, “love”, “cute”, “great”, “awesome” occurred more often than these with negative ones. In replies all emojis were positive. Conclusions: Numerous Instagram® posts referring to cleft lip are published and do provoke discussion. People express their solidarity and sympathize with persons affected by cleft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Based Dentistry: Personalized Therapy and Prevention)
Article
Evaluation of Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP-8) in Periodontal Patients Undergoing Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy and Mouthwash Based on Ozonated Olive Oil: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6619; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186619 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 979
Abstract
Background: Extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a pivotal role in the damage to the periodontal tissue in patients with periodontitis. Scaling and root planning (SRP) attempt to control the plaque amount and consequentially reduce the bacterial load. Non-surgical periodontal treatment could be [...] Read more.
Background: Extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a pivotal role in the damage to the periodontal tissue in patients with periodontitis. Scaling and root planning (SRP) attempt to control the plaque amount and consequentially reduce the bacterial load. Non-surgical periodontal treatment could be integrated with drug therapy and physiotherapy procedures such as ozone therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of periodontitis: (1) the efficacy of non-surgical periodontal therapy assisted by the use of ozonated olive oil-based mouthwash on salivary metalloproteinase (MMP-8) and (2) the reduction of periodontal indices. Methods: Ninety-six subjects with a diagnosis of periodontitis were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to the study group (SRP + mouthwash) or control group (SRP). The study duration was 3 months. Data on MMP-8, plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BoP) and probing pocket depth (PPD) were recorded at T0, T1 (14 days), T2 (1 month) and T3 (6 months). Group differences were assessed using Student’s t-test for independent samples. Results: A significant improvement in PI, BoP, PPD and salivary MMP-8 levels was observed in both groups. An analysis of differences in relative changes of indices revealed the efficacy of ozonated olive oil in decreasing MMP-8 level. Simultaneously, it slowed the decrease of BoP index. Conclusions: Scaling and root plaining with the aid of ozonated olive oil mouthwash were found to be more effective on salivary MMP-8 reduction than scaling and root plaining alone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Based Dentistry: Personalized Therapy and Prevention)
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Review

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Review
Maternal and Neonatal Oral Microbiome Developmental Patterns and Correlated Factors: A Systematic Review—Does the Apple Fall Close to the Tree?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5569; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115569 - 23 May 2021
Viewed by 1032
Abstract
(1) Background: The purpose of the study was to comprehensively analyze the relationship between the mother’s oral microbiome, modes of delivery and feeding, and the formation of the newborn child’s oral microbiome. (2) Methods: This systematic review included a search through MEDLINE (PubMed) [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The purpose of the study was to comprehensively analyze the relationship between the mother’s oral microbiome, modes of delivery and feeding, and the formation of the newborn child’s oral microbiome. (2) Methods: This systematic review included a search through MEDLINE (PubMed) database (from 2010 to July 2020). Research was registered in PROSPERO under the number CRD42021241044. (3) Results: Of the 571 studies, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Included studies were classified according to (i) child’s delivery mode, (ii) maternal exposure to antibiotics and disinfectants, and (iii) feeding type. (4) Conclusions: The interpretation of these papers shows that the type of delivery, maternal exposure to disinfectants and antibiotics during delivery, maternal health classed as overweight, gestational diabetes mellitus, and feeding type are correlated to changes in the maternal and neonatal early oral microbiomes, based on the analysis provided in this systematic review. Because no evidence exists regarding the impact of maternal diet and maternal oral health on the establishment and development of the early oral newborn microbiome, more studies are needed to deepen the knowledge and understanding of the subject and develop preventive and therapeutic strategies of support to pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Based Dentistry: Personalized Therapy and Prevention)
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Other

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Brief Report
Mouthwash Based on Ozonated Olive Oil in Caries Prevention: A Preliminary In-Vitro Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9106; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17239106 - 06 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 916
Abstract
(1) Background: Ozone (O3) proved to oxidize organic and inorganic compounds, and its efficacy against bacteria, viruses and fungi plasma membranes was of interest. Ozone vehicle can be a gaseous form, ozonated water or ozonized oil. The aim of this in-vitro study was [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Ozone (O3) proved to oxidize organic and inorganic compounds, and its efficacy against bacteria, viruses and fungi plasma membranes was of interest. Ozone vehicle can be a gaseous form, ozonated water or ozonized oil. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of ozonated olive oil against Streptococcus mutans. (2) Methods: Two different commercial mouthwashes were tested: Ialozon Blu (IB) (Gemavip, Cagliari, Italy), with ozonated olive oil, and Ialozon Rose (IR) (Gemavip, Cagliari, Italy), with ozonated olive oil, hyaluronic acid and vitamin E. All formulates were analyzed in a dilution range from 2- to 256-folds in saline solution, as to reproduce the salivary dilution. Streptococcus mutans CIP103220 strain was used for the antimicrobial susceptibility test, and the Kirby–Bauer inhibition method was performed to evaluate the Minimum Inhibitory (MIC), Minimum Bactericidal (MBC), and Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MBIC). (3) Results: Both formulates showed the same antimicrobial activity. MIC, MBC, and MBIC were observed for dilution factors of 1/32, 1/8 and 1/8, respectively. The mean value of inhibition zone diameter was 16.5 mm for IB, and 18 mm for IR. (4) Conclusions: The results suggested that ozonized olive oil formulates were able to inactivate Streptococcus mutans avoiding the salivary dilution effect in the oral cavity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Based Dentistry: Personalized Therapy and Prevention)
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