Special Issue "Women's Health Care: Menstrual Disorders, Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mike Armour
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
Interests: endometriosis; gynaecology; complementary medicine; pelvic pain; dysmenorrhea; vulvodynia
Dr. Carolyn Ee
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
Interests: obesity; overweight; women’s health; polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS); breast cancer; integrative healthcare; Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Women’s health conditions such as primary dysmenorrhea, pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), and various causes of chronic or persistent pelvic pain such as endometriosis and vulvodynia affect millions of women worldwide. Endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain cost 9.7 billion dollars a year in Australia alone, mostly due to lost productivity, while young women around the world report regularly missing school or university due to menstrual symptoms. Despite this, there is often a lack of institutional support at school and in the workplace to help women reduce the potential impact of their menstrual symptoms.

While there is an assumption that reliable information on women’s health is available via the internet, most young women have poor menstrual health literacy and often normalise their menstrual symptoms, even when quite severe. This is often compounded by family, friends, and even medical professionals either dismissing or minimising their symptoms. The consequence of this is that women often are left to manage their own symptoms, and this in turn can lead to inadequate pain and symptom management, potential issues with fertility, as well as the potential for missing or delaying diagnosis for more serious underlying conditions.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the diagnosis, impact, treatment, or experience of women with menstrual disorders, endometriosis, or Chronic Pelvic Pain in low-, middle-, or high-income countries. Both quantitative and qualitative research submissions from the areas of public health, medicine, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, social work, and law are encouraged, and systematic or narrative reviews are welcome. The keywords provided are just an example of some of the common conditions that fall within the broad scope of this area.

Dr. Mike Armour
Dr. Carolyn Ee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dysmenorrhea
  • pelvic pain
  • pre-menstrual syndrome
  • health literacy
  • endometriosis
  • PCOS
  • vulvodynia
  • adenomyosis

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Insomnia, Inattention and Fatigue Symptoms of Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6192; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126192 - 08 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1065
Abstract
Aim: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has predictable, cyclic, psychological, and somatic symptoms, such as sleep problems. They result in functional impairment, are aggravated in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and are resolved by menstruation. The present study evaluated the insomnia, [...] Read more.
Aim: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has predictable, cyclic, psychological, and somatic symptoms, such as sleep problems. They result in functional impairment, are aggravated in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and are resolved by menstruation. The present study evaluated the insomnia, inattention, and fatigue symptoms of PMDD and their fluctuations during the menstrual cycle. Methods: A total of 100 women were diagnosed as having PMDD based on psychiatric interviews and a prospective investigation of three menstrual cycles. A total of 96 individuals without PMDD were recruited as controls. Their symptoms, namely insomnia, inattention, and fatigue as well as functional impairment were assessed by using the premenstrual symptoms screening tool, the Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale, the attention and performance self-assessment scale, and the fatigue-assessment scale during both premenstrual and follicular phases. Results: In both the premenstrual and follicular phases, women with PMDD experienced more severe insomnia, inattentiveness, and fatigue than did women in the control group. A paired t-test demonstrated that women with PMDD had more severe severity insomnia, inattentiveness, and fatigue in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase. A repeated-measures analysis of variance demonstrated that the interaction period of PMDD and a menstrual cycle was significantly associated with insomnia, inattentiveness, and fatigue. A further correlation analysis demonstrated that all three symptoms were positively associated with self-reported functional impairment due to PMDD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that women with PMDD experienced an exacerbation of insomnia, memory problems, difficulty maintaining focus, and fatigue in the premenstrual phase. These symptoms are correlated with PMDD symptoms severity and functional impairment, and as such, they should be evaluated, and interventions should be employed in the late luteal phase of women with PMDD. Full article
Article
The Role of Research in Guiding Treatment for Women’s Health: A Qualitative Study of Traditional Chinese Medicine Acupuncturists
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 834; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020834 - 19 Jan 2021
Viewed by 2233
Abstract
Background: Surveys of acupuncture practitioners worldwide have shown an increase in the use of acupuncture to treat women’s health conditions over the last ten years. Published studies have explored the effectiveness of acupuncture for various conditions such as period pain, fertility, and labor [...] Read more.
Background: Surveys of acupuncture practitioners worldwide have shown an increase in the use of acupuncture to treat women’s health conditions over the last ten years. Published studies have explored the effectiveness of acupuncture for various conditions such as period pain, fertility, and labor induction. However, it is unclear what role, if any, peer-reviewed research plays in guiding practice. Methods: Acupuncturists with a significant women’s health caseload were interviewed online in three small groups to explore factors that contribute to acupuncturists’ clinical decision made around treatment approaches and research. Results: Eleven practitioners participated in the focus groups. The overarching theme that emerged was one of ‘Not mainstream but a stream.’ This captured two themes relating to acupuncture as a distinct practice: ‘working with what you’ve got’ as well as ‘finding the right lens’, illustrating practitioners’ perception of research needing to be more relevant to clinical practice. Conclusions: Acupuncture practitioners treating women’s health conditions reported a disconnect between their clinical practice and the design of clinical trials, predominantly due to what they perceived as a lack of individualization of treatment. Case histories were popular as a learning tool and could be used to support increasing research literacy. Full article
Article
Association between Childhood Maltreatment History and Premenstrual Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 781; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020781 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 968
Abstract
Childhood maltreatment history has known relationships with various mental and physical diseases; however, little is known about its association with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). In this study, we investigated the association between childhood maltreatment history and PMS among young women in Japan. In a [...] Read more.
Childhood maltreatment history has known relationships with various mental and physical diseases; however, little is known about its association with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). In this study, we investigated the association between childhood maltreatment history and PMS among young women in Japan. In a Japanese city, we approached 3815 women aged 10–60 years who visited a gynecology clinic and one general practice clinic. A questionnaire on childhood maltreatment history and PMS was administered to them. We observed that women with histories of childhood maltreatment demonstrated a significantly increased risk of PMS compared with those without such histories (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.81). Particularly, women with childhood physical or emotional abuse demonstrated a stronger association with PMS, whereas other forms of childhood maltreatment (emotional neglect, witnessing of intimate-partner violence, or sexual abuse) were not associated with PMS. Our results illustrate that childhood maltreatment may be a risk factor for PMS. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Stigma and Endometriosis: A Brief Overview and Recommendations to Improve Psychosocial Well-Being and Diagnostic Delay
by , , and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8210; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18158210 - 03 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1289
Abstract
Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease that affects approximately 1 in 10 women of reproductive age. Symptoms of severe pelvic pain, infertility, fatigue, and abnormal menstruation can cause significant negative effects on an individual’s physical and mental health, including interactions with their family, [...] Read more.
Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease that affects approximately 1 in 10 women of reproductive age. Symptoms of severe pelvic pain, infertility, fatigue, and abnormal menstruation can cause significant negative effects on an individual’s physical and mental health, including interactions with their family, friends, and health care providers. Stigma associated with endometriosis has been under-studied and is rarely discussed in current literature. Herein, this paper aims to provide a brief overview of published literature to explore and establish the plausibility of stigma as a driver of suboptimal psychosocial well-being and diagnostic delay among individuals living with endometriosis. We present the clinical characteristics and physical and mental health consequences associated with endometriosis, highlight several theoretical constructs of stigma, and review the limited studies documenting women’s lived experiences of endometriosis-related stigma. To mitigate harmful effects of this phenomenon, we recommend increasing efforts to assess the prevalence of and to characterize endometriosis-related stigma, implementing awareness campaigns, and developing interventions that combat the multidimensional negative effects of stigma on timely care, treatment, and quality of life for individuals living with endometriosis. Full article
Review
Adolescent Menstrual Health Literacy in Low, Middle and High-Income Countries: A Narrative Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2260; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052260 - 25 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1951
Abstract
Background: Poor menstrual health literacy impacts adolescents’ quality of life and health outcomes across the world. The aim of this systematic review was to identify concerns about menstrual health literacy in low/middle-income countries (LMICs) and high-income countries (HICs). Methods: Relevant social science and [...] Read more.
Background: Poor menstrual health literacy impacts adolescents’ quality of life and health outcomes across the world. The aim of this systematic review was to identify concerns about menstrual health literacy in low/middle-income countries (LMICs) and high-income countries (HICs). Methods: Relevant social science and medical databases were searched for peer-reviewed papers published from January 2008 to January 2020, leading to the identification of 61 relevant studies. Results: A thematic analysis of the data revealed that LMICs report detrimental impacts on adolescents in relation to menstrual hygiene and cultural issues, while in HICs, issues related to pain management and long-term health outcomes were reported more frequently. Conclusions: In order to improve overall menstrual health literacy in LMICs and HICs, appropriate policies need to be developed, drawing on input from multiple stakeholders to ensure evidence-based and cost-effective practical interventions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop