Special Issue "Health Promotion in Relation to Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity in the Era of Sars-Cov2 Pandemic"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alessandra Sannella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Sciences, Society and Health, University of Cassino-Campus Folcara, 03043 Cassino, Italy
Interests: sustainable development; public health; inequality; migration phenomenon and health; violence
Prof. Dr. Cristina Cortis
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Human Sciences, Society and Health University of Cassino e Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino, Italy
Interests: sport; performance; monitoring; physical activity; training; testing; motor control
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the context of contemporary society, the SARS-CoV-2 virus has created a megatrend on a planetary scale that has greatly changed the quality of daily life of the global population, with the first event in the history of humanity that can be considered as a “total social fact” (Mauss: 1924). In addition to this, the crisis caused by COVID-19 and the lack of an organic vision has underlined the importance of a public health system that can respond to the complexity of its surrounding environment. Such complex needs make it necessary to provide complex and immediate answers. In fact, in addition to the direct damage caused by the virus, we have been able to record problems related to “secondary causes of COVID” such as changes in eating habits, sedentary behaviors, sports, and motor activities. The “secondary causes” identified here are to be interpreted as the possibility of increasing one’s exposure to the risk of damage caused by the “imperfect storm” of the pandemic. Causes which worsen the state of health, such as environment and lifestyle, could also be recorded. These elements were recorded both during and after the lockdown phases in most of the countries affected by COVID-19. Therefore, it is necessary to change harmful attitudes in both individual and public health in order to achieve the goal of a complete state of well-being and not just the absence of disease, which is in accordance with the UN Agenda 2030 and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Reflection requires an environment of consilience and an orchestration of science (Whewell 1840) which is also in line with the principle of the Prevent–Detect–Respond strategy (WHO: 2018). Specifically, transdisciplinary contributions related to the possibility of educating people towards a cultural change of lifestyle that can improve the quality of the population on a universal scale are required.

Prof. Dr. Alessandra Sannella
Prof. Dr. Cristina Cortis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Public health
  • Covid19
  • Sustainable development
  • Behaviour
  • Physical Activity
  • Inequality
  • Nutrition

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Effect of Social Isolation on Physical Activity during the COVID-19 Pandemic in France
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5070; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105070 - 11 May 2021
Viewed by 712
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study is to analyze the changes in physical activity (PA) practice of a sample of 2099 French adults, mostly females, who answered an online questionnaire during the first COVID-19 lockdown (March–May 2020). A descriptive analysis of participants was [...] Read more.
The objective of this cross-sectional study is to analyze the changes in physical activity (PA) practice of a sample of 2099 French adults, mostly females, who answered an online questionnaire during the first COVID-19 lockdown (March–May 2020). A descriptive analysis of participants was performed using relative frequencies. Chi-squared tests were performed to compare the responses of selected variables. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to compare the variations of PA with all the variables identified. The age of participants ranged from 18 to 88. Among people who practiced PAs before the first lockdown, the probability to keep practicing PAs is higher among those with a lower level of education, among housewives and retirees and among those who lived in cities of 10,000–19,999 inhabitants. For those who did not practice PAs before the social distancing, the probability of starting to practice is greater in those with a lower level of education and for those who suffered from a chronic disease. Our results place the emphasis on the complexity and multifactoriality of the changes that emerged during the first lockdown. The “education” factor emerges, as a significant determinant of PA that should certainly be explored further. Full article
Article
A Cross-Country Examination on the Fear of COVID-19 and the Sense of Loneliness during the First Wave of COVID-19 Outbreak
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2586; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052586 - 05 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 956
Abstract
The aim of the current study is to examine gender, age. and cross-country differences in fear of COVID-19 and sense of loneliness during the lockdown, by comparing people from those countries with a high rate of infections and deaths (e.g., Spain and Italy) [...] Read more.
The aim of the current study is to examine gender, age. and cross-country differences in fear of COVID-19 and sense of loneliness during the lockdown, by comparing people from those countries with a high rate of infections and deaths (e.g., Spain and Italy) and from countries with a mild spread of infection (e.g., Croatia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). A total of 3876 participants (63% female) completed an online survey on “Everyday life practices in COVID-19 time” in April 2020, including measures of fear of COVID-19 and loneliness. Males and females of all age groups in countries suffering from the powerful impact of the COVID-19 pandemic reported greater fear of COVID-19 and sense of loneliness. In less endangered countries, females and the elderly reported more symptoms than males and the young; in Spanish and Italian samples, the pattern of differences is considerably more complex. Future research should thoroughly examine different age and gender groups. The analysis of emotional well-being in groups at risk of mental health issues may help to lessen the long term social and economic costs due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Full article
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Review

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Review
Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior and Well-Being of Adults with Physical Disabilities and/or Chronic Diseases during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Rapid Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6342; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126342 - 11 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Background: People with physical disabilities and/or chronic diseases report lower levels of physical activity and well-being than the general population, which potentially is exacerbated through the COVID-19 pandemic. This study explored the international literature on physical activity, sedentary behavior and well-being in adults [...] Read more.
Background: People with physical disabilities and/or chronic diseases report lower levels of physical activity and well-being than the general population, which potentially is exacerbated through the COVID-19 pandemic. This study explored the international literature on physical activity, sedentary behavior and well-being in adults with physical disabilities and/or chronic diseases during the first wave of the pandemic. Method: In a rapid review, we included studies reporting on physical activity, sedentary behavior and/or well-being in adults with physical disabilities and/or chronic diseases. Four databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Embase) were searched for studies published until 30 September 2020. Results: We included twenty-nine studies involving eleven different types of disabilities or health conditions from twenty-one different countries. Twenty-six studies reported on physical activity, of which one reported an increase during the COVID-19 pandemic, four studies reported no difference, and twenty-one studies reported a decrease. Thirteen studies reported a decline in well-being. Only one study measured sedentary behavior, reporting an increase. Conclusion: Despite the variety in methods used, almost all studies reported negative impacts on physical activity and well-being in people with physical disabilities and/or chronic disease during the first wave of the pandemic. These findings highlight the importance of supporting this population, especially in times of crisis. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The effect of social isolation on physical activity during the Covid-19 pandemic in France
Authors: Porrovecchio Alessandro; Olivares Pedro R.; Masson Philippe; Pezé Thierry; Lombi Linda
Affiliation: 1 Univ. Littoral Côte d’Opale, Univ. Lille, Univ. Artois - ULR 7369 - URePSSS - Unité de Recherche Pluridisciplinaire Sport Santé Société, 59140, Dunkerque, France, 2 Universidad de Huelva. Faculty of Sport Sciences. Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas S/N Huelva, Spain, 3 Universidad Autonoma de Chile. Instituto de Actividad Fisica y Salud, Talca, Chile. 4 Univ. Lille, Univ. Littoral Côte d’Opale, Univ. Artois - ULR 7369 - URePSSS - Unité de Recherche Pluridisciplinaire Sport Santé Société, 59000, Lille, France. 5 Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy.
Abstract: Aims: This paper focuses on the changes in physical activity’s (PA) practice of a sample of French people during the lockdown.Methods: A descriptive analysis of participants was performed using relative frequencies. Chi-squared tests were performed to compare the responses of selected variables. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to compare the variations of PA with all the variables identified.Results: A sample of 2099 participants was considered, mostly females (81.6%). The age of participants ranged from 18 to 88 (mean age: 41.1). Among people who practiced PAs before the social distancing period, the probability to keep practicing PAs is higher among those with a lower level of education (1.96 times), among housewives and retirees (2.94 and 2.86 times respectively) and among those who lived in cities of 10,000-19,999 inhabitants. For those who did not practice PAs before the social distancing, the probability of starting to practice is greater in those with a lower level of education (3.12 and 2.22 for “lower secondary school or less” and “Diploma/upper secondary school” respectively) and for those who suffered from a chronic disease (1.51 times). Conclusions: Our results place the emphasis on the complexity and multifactoriality of the changes that emerged during the lockdown, in relation to the various profiles of respondents. In this complexity, the "education" factor emerges, as a significant determinant of PA that certainly has to be explored further.

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