Special Issue "Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Abrar-Ahmad Zulfiqar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Interests: telemedicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Described since the 1970s, the frailty syndrome is a dynamic and evolving geriatric concept, involving many dimensions of everyday life and leading to a risk of developing a loss of autonomy. It corresponds to a precarious state of equilibrium combined with a reduction of physiological reserves linked to aging and is responsible for an inability to respond to physical, psychological, or social stress. Its management requires medical, social, and psychological interventions. It is becoming increasingly important that we detect signs of frailty among individuals on the cusp of old age, not only to ensure this population ages “successfully” but also to avoid unnecessary health-related expenses. The main purpose of this call of paper is to study the frailty syndrome as much on the physiopathological mechanisms which govern it, its daily detection in ambulatory medicine (primary care) or in hospital environment by appropriate scales of identification, and the repercussions of this syndrome.

Dr. Abrar-Ahmad Zulfiqar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • frailty syndrome
  • scales
  • primary care
  • physiopathological mechanisms
  • inflammaging
  • geriatric risk

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Factors Affecting Dietary Improvements in Elderly Residents of Long-Term Care Institutions Receiving Domiciliary Dental Care
Medicines 2021, 8(11), 62; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8110062 - 21 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Background: Oral disabilities occur due to tooth loss. This study aimed to investigate oral and systemic factors related to diet in elderly residents receiving domiciliary dental care. Methods: The subjects were 74 consenting residents. Survey items included whether subjects could eat independently and [...] Read more.
Background: Oral disabilities occur due to tooth loss. This study aimed to investigate oral and systemic factors related to diet in elderly residents receiving domiciliary dental care. Methods: The subjects were 74 consenting residents. Survey items included whether subjects could eat independently and diet type. Subjects were examined by the dentist for the number of teeth, occlusal support index, and wearing dentures. Contingency table analysis was performed to determine what levels of decline in general and oral functions led to difficulties eating a normal diet. Results: There was a significant difference in the mean number of activities of daily living (ADL) requiring assistance evident between subjects eating a normal diet and those eating fluid boiled rice (p < 0.01). A comparison of occlusal support and diet type showed that most subjects who ate a soft diet or gruel had no occlusal support. Almost all subjects who ate a normal diet wore dentures. However, only 38% of subjects eating a soft diet and 40% of those eating gruel did wear dentures; both group differences were significant (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Future studies need to further investigate oral factors related to the type of diet and their relationships to domiciliary dental care in older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society)

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Brief Report
Zulfiqar Frailty Scale: Overview, Stakes, and Possibilities
Medicines 2021, 8(12), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8120073 - 23 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Very few frailty scales are used by general practitioners, as they are time consuming and cumbersome. We developed a frailty screening tool for use in primary care, referred to as the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS). This scale was tested in multiple general practitioners’ [...] Read more.
Very few frailty scales are used by general practitioners, as they are time consuming and cumbersome. We developed a frailty screening tool for use in primary care, referred to as the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS). This scale was tested in multiple general practitioners’ offices in France, and these studies were published. In this paper, we offer a summary of these results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society)
Brief Report
Concordance in mSEGA Tool to Frailty Diagnosis between Medical Doctors and Nurses
Medicines 2021, 8(11), 63; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8110063 - 29 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Introduction: It is currently considered that screening for frailty in elderly subjects is a major public health issue. Methods: a cross-sectional pilot study involving elderly subjects (over 75 years of age) admitted at the emergency department of the hospital of Troyes, France in [...] Read more.
Introduction: It is currently considered that screening for frailty in elderly subjects is a major public health issue. Methods: a cross-sectional pilot study involving elderly subjects (over 75 years of age) admitted at the emergency department of the hospital of Troyes, France in the period from 24 August to 30 August 2017 was conducted. The patients were screened for frailty using the modified SEGA (Short Emergency Geriatric Assessment) (part A) grid (mSEGA), correlated with the subjective opinion of the triage nurse and the senior physician. Results: 100 patients were included during the pilot study period, the mean age was 84.34 years (range: 75–97), 56 patients (56%) were female, and the average CHARLSON score was 4.28 (range: 0–11). The patients’ previous medical histories were remarkable for cardiovascular diseases. The main reason for hospital admission was fall (26 subjects, 26%). Hospitalization was required for 52 subjects (52%). The average mSEGA score was 6.3 +/− 3.59. The completion time for the SEGAm (part A) score was about 5 minutes. According to Cohen’s kappa, the concordance between the subjective opinion of the triage nurse and the mSEGA grid was average, while the concordance between the subjective opinions of the senior physicians was good. Conclusion: The mSEGA score appears to be well-suited and useful in the emergency department. It is easy to use, allows an overall evaluation of the patient, and is not time-consuming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society)
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Brief Report
Validation of the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS): A New Tool for General Practitioners
Medicines 2021, 8(9), 52; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8090052 - 04 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Introduction: The early detection of frailty, a frequent transient state that can be reversible in the elderly and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, helps prevent complications from it. Objective: To evaluate the performance of the “ZFS” tool to screen for frailty [...] Read more.
Introduction: The early detection of frailty, a frequent transient state that can be reversible in the elderly and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, helps prevent complications from it. Objective: To evaluate the performance of the “ZFS” tool to screen for frailty as defined SEGA scale criteria in an ambulatory population of patients at least 65 years of age. Methods: A prospective non-interventional study conducted in Alsace for a duration of six months that included patients aged 65 and over, judged to be autonomous with an ADL > 4/6. Results: In this ambulatory population of 102 patients with an average age of 76 years, frailty, according to modified SEGA criteria grid A, had a prevalence of 19.6%. Frailty, according to the “ZFS” tool, had a prevalence of 35.0%, and all of its elements except weight loss were significantly associated with frailty. Its threshold for identifying frailty is three criteria out of six. It was rapid (average completion time: 87 s), had a sensitivity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusions: The “ZFS” tool makes it possible to screen for frailty with a high level of sensitivity and a negative predictive value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society)
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