Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511). This special issue belongs to the section "Internet of Things".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020) | Viewed by 29781

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Valladolid, Campus Duques de Soria, 42004 Soria, Spain
Interests: energy; engineering; computer science; photovoltaic systems; microgrids; distributed generation; smart metering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

A fundamental prerequisite that will help to foster the economic strength of cities is efficient and sustainable mobility schemes, which will ensure the efficient exchange of people and goods while limiting negative environmental and social externalities. It is not only important to reduce environmental impacts, but also to ensure that the quality of life in this environment is as high as possible, so that cities are places where social and economic activity is attractive. New technological advances facilitate a cooperative environment in which road users, transport systems, infrastructure, and other external agents are connected. The new smart mobility solutions offer a great opportunity to optimize and improve planning and to increase the efficiency of transport systems operation, as well as contribute to reducing their main externalities.

Traffic management and asset location are some of the applications associated with mobility where the vast irruption of the Internet of Things (IoT) is leading the development of disruptive ICT solutions. The proliferation of IoT devices used in mobility enables a large range of applications but poses new challenges, especially in communications, data orchestration, edge computing, cybersecurity or new interfaces that enables their use, for example, while driving a car.

This Special Issue focuses on mobility and IoT and the benefits that these contribute to the city. This area includes proposals on citizen mobility, electric vehicles, alternative mobility (cycle lanes, pedestrianization, etc.), cybersecurity, communications, and systems in Smart Cities. Therefore, the Special Issue is focused on but not limited to the following topics:

  • Architectures for IoT data management in mobility;
  • Artificial Intelligence and context-awareness for smart mobility based on IoT;
  • Edge computing for the smart mobility;
  • Communications for the IoT in mobility;
  • M2M and vehicular (V2X) communications and interoperability for the IoT;
  • Wearable devices;
  • Energy efficiency and energy harvesting on the IoT for smart mobility;
  • Cybersecurity for the IoT in mobility;
  • IoT applications and testbeds for smart mobility;
  • Connected vehicles and the IoT;
  • Enabling infrastructures for smart mobility;
  • Smart mobility and the smart grid;
  • Governance and smart mobility.

Prof. Dr. Luis Hernández-Callejo
Prof. Dr. Sergio Nesmachnow
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • IoT
  • smart mobility
  • connected vehicle
  • cybersecurity
  • edge computing
  • M2M communications

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

9 pages, 627 KiB  
Editorial
CITIES: Ibero-American Research Network for Sustainable, Efficient, and Integrated Smart Cities
by Sergio Nesmachnow and Luis Hernández-Callejo
Smart Cities 2020, 3(3), 758-766; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3030038 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2917
Abstract
This article describes CITIES, the Ibero-American research network for integrated, sustainable, and efficient smart cities. General/specific goals of the network are commented, and participant members are introduced. The main activities developed within the network are described, including research, education, outreach, and dissemination. Finally, [...] Read more.
This article describes CITIES, the Ibero-American research network for integrated, sustainable, and efficient smart cities. General/specific goals of the network are commented, and participant members are introduced. The main activities developed within the network are described, including research, education, outreach, and dissemination. Finally, some key aspects of the current and future work are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Research

Jump to: Editorial

15 pages, 5132 KiB  
Article
Power Supply Solution for Ultrahigh Speed Hyperloop Trains
by Marcos Lafoz, Gustavo Navarro, Jorge Torres, Álvaro Santiago, Jorge Nájera, Miguel Santos-Herran and Marcos Blanco
Smart Cities 2020, 3(3), 642-656; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3030033 - 9 Jul 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5357
Abstract
The paper analyses the alternatives for the power supply of a Hyperloop type railway transport. The particular case of the technology of the Spanish company ZELEROS was studied. Based on previous technical specifications related to both the first prototype and a commercial system, [...] Read more.
The paper analyses the alternatives for the power supply of a Hyperloop type railway transport. The particular case of the technology of the Spanish company ZELEROS was studied. Based on previous technical specifications related to both the first prototype and a commercial system, different options were analyzed. We selected the use of a linear motor driven by a single power electronic converter, a distribution scheme comprising different sections along the acceleration area of the track, and an energy storage system based on supercapacitors for the energy supply. The power/energy ratio and the cycle capability are the reasons to become a feasible and competitive solution. A preliminary design methodology for the energy storage requirements is presented in the paper. Once the type of linear motor was selected, the power supply scheme was presented, based on a motor-side power electronic converter and a DC/DC converter which connects to the energy storage devices. An additional low power grid-tie converter for the recharge of the energy storage system was also used. Different track sections were defined, connected to the power electronic converter through corresponding switches, being supplied sequentially when the capsule presence is detected along the track. The particular characteristics of this application, with relatively short traction track area, as well as the high energy recuperation ratio due to the low losses, make more suitable the use of energy storage systems as the source of power supply than the direct connection to the grid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

32 pages, 8737 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Sustainable Public Transportation and Mobility Recommendations for Montevideo and Parque Rodó Neighborhood
by Silvina Hipogrosso and Sergio Nesmachnow
Smart Cities 2020, 3(2), 479-510; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3020026 - 1 Jun 2020
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 4637
Abstract
This article presents an analysis and characterization of recent sustainable initiatives developed for the public transportation of Montevideo, Uruguay. In addition, specific analysis and recommendations are proposed for the Parque Rodó neighborhood, based on a survey performed to people that commute to/from that [...] Read more.
This article presents an analysis and characterization of recent sustainable initiatives developed for the public transportation of Montevideo, Uruguay. In addition, specific analysis and recommendations are proposed for the Parque Rodó neighborhood, based on a survey performed to people that commute to/from that area. The analysis considers the main concepts from related works, evaluating relevant quantitative (coverage, accessibility, affordability, etc.) and qualitative (public finance, integration, comfort and pleasure, etc.) indicators. Three sustainable public transportation initiatives are studied: electric bus, public bicycles, and electric scooters. Results of the analysis for each transportation mode suggest that the first initiatives focus on specific sectors of the population and should be improved in order to extend their accessibility and affordability. In turn, coverage must also be expanded. Regarding the analysis of the Parque Rodó neighborhood, results indicate that people are willing to perform the modal shift to more sustainable transportation modes, but several improvements are needed to improve the quality of service. All these aspects are considered in the proposed guidelines for a sustainable mobility plan in the area and also for suggestions and recommendations formulated to develop and improve sustainable mobility in Montevideo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 2722 KiB  
Article
Using Smart City Tools to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a Low Emissions Zone in Spain: Madrid Central
by Irene Lebrusán and Jamal Toutouh
Smart Cities 2020, 3(2), 456-478; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3020025 - 1 Jun 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 5727
Abstract
Population concentration in cities brings new risks as an increase in pollution, which causes urban health problems. In order to address this problem, traffic reduction measures are being implemented as pedestrianization areas; they are the definition of Low Emissions Zones (LEZs). When the [...] Read more.
Population concentration in cities brings new risks as an increase in pollution, which causes urban health problems. In order to address this problem, traffic reduction measures are being implemented as pedestrianization areas; they are the definition of Low Emissions Zones (LEZs). When the effectiveness of these types of measures is in doubt, smart city tools provide data that can be used to scientifically asses their impact. This article analyzes the situation of Madrid Central (Spain), a LEZ subject to controversy. We apply statistical and regression analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of this measure to reduce air pollution and outdoor noise. According to the results, this LEZ was able to significantly reduce NO 2 , PM 2.5 , and PM 10 concentration locally, having the same positive impact in the rest of the city. In terms of noise, this measure was able to mitigate background noise levels generated by road traffic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 7663 KiB  
Article
Smart Bus Stops as Interconnected Public Spaces for Increasing Social Inclusiveness and Quality of Life of Elder Users
by Víctor Manuel Padrón Nápoles, Diego Gachet Páez, José Luis Esteban Penelas, Olalla García Pérez, María José García Santacruz and Fernando Martín de Pablos
Smart Cities 2020, 3(2), 430-443; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3020023 - 1 Jun 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 9437
Abstract
As the Smart City concept evolves, it necessarily incorporates more sustainability and inclusiveness features. In this context, the mobility of people is still one of the major challenges for cities. Among the most vulnerable group of citizens are the elderly, as they demand [...] Read more.
As the Smart City concept evolves, it necessarily incorporates more sustainability and inclusiveness features. In this context, the mobility of people is still one of the major challenges for cities. Among the most vulnerable group of citizens are the elderly, as they demand special requirements in the design of smart mobility. At the same time, smart cities’ technologies could be used to maintain their quality of life. From an architectural and sociological point of view, smart cities change the meaning and the use of public spaces, from physical meeting places to relational public spaces, in which humans use interposed technological means and information flows. This leads to the concept of Interconnected Public Spaces: a mixture of physical and virtual environments, generating interconnections at a planetary scale, that can be used to attract elderly people for collectively sharing experiences outdoor in public spaces (parks, squares or bus stops, in any city on our planet), increasing their physical form and stimulating them mentally, socially and emotionally. This paper describes the development of an inclusive smart bus stop prototype and the use of its ICT infrastructure to build Interconnected Public Spaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobility and IoT for the Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop