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Special Issue "Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dominik Zimon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management Systems and Logistics, Rzeszow University of Technology, Powstańców Warszawy 10 St, 35-959 Rzeszow, Poland
Interests: quality management; supply chain; logistics; sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The image of a modern supply chain has become inseparably associated with its care for ecological aspects and sustainable development. It can be assumed that the pursuit of sustainable supply chain management results from the needs of the modern world, and efficiency and care for natural resources contribute not only to improving its image but also to waste reduction, innovation, generating profits, and building a competitive advantage. Now more than ever, SSCM is a prerequisite for developing effective business models aligned with long-term goals. However, it should be emphasized that this paradigm is complex and requires a departure from random and reactive activities. Managers need to focus on comprehensive management including social, economic, and ecological performance. Additionally, the process of implementing sustainable solutions in the supply chain is time-consuming and can generate numerous problems that effectively discourage business managers and entrepreneurs from continuing their efforts to implement environmentally friendly solutions. Yet, as we all know, one entity’s problems are another’s opportunity. 

Considering the above, this Special Issue looks for outstanding research and development results, case studies, and review papers in topics that include but are not limited to the following:

  • Sustainability in supply chain management;
  • Drivers and barriers SSCM;
  • UN SDGs;
  • Risk management in the SSCM;
  • Models of SSCM;
  • Management systems and improving SSCM;
  • ISO 14001, ISO 9001, and ISO 22000;
  • Green supply chain management;
  • Environmental management;
  • Social responsibility.

Thank you for your contributions.

References

1. Zimon, D.; Tyan, J.; Sroufe, R. Implementing Sustainable Supply Chain Management: Reactive, Cooperative, and Dynamic Models. Sustainability 2019, 11, 7227.
2. Gosling, J.; Jia, F.; Gong, Y.; Brown, S. The role of supply chain leadership in the learning of sustainable practice: Toward an integrated framework. J. Clean. Prod. 2017, 140, 239–250.
3. Rebs, T.; Brandenburg, M.; Seuring, S. System dynamics modeling for sustainable supply chain management: A literature review and systems thinking approach. J. Clean. Prod. 2019, 208, 1265-1280.
4. Curkovic, S. and Sroufe, R. (2011), "Using ISO 14001 to promote a sustainable supply chain strategy", Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol. 20 No. 2, pp. 71-93.
5. Zimon D, Madzik P. Impact of Implementing ISO 14001 Standard Requirements for Sustainable Supply Chain Management in the Textile Industry. FIBRES & TEXTILES in Eastern Europe 2019; 27, 6(138): 8-14.
6. Svensson, G. (2007). Aspects of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM): conceptual framework and empirical example. Supply chain management: An international journal, 12(4), 262-266.
7. Pagell, M., & Shevchenko, A. (2014). Why research in sustainable supply chain management should have no future. Journal of supply chain management, 50(1), 44-55.
8. Zimon, D. and Madzík, P. (2019). Standardized management systems and risk management in the supply chain. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management.

Dr. Dominik Zimon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SSCM
  • Models of SSCM
  • UN SDGs
  • Drivers and barriers

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

Article
A Network Maturity Mapping Tool for Demand-Driven Supply Chain Management: A Case for the Public Healthcare Sector
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11988; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su132111988 - 29 Oct 2021
Viewed by 335
Abstract
The healthcare supply chain is a complex adaptive ecosystem that facilitates the delivery of health products to the end patient in a cost-effective way. However, low forecast accuracy and high demand volatility in healthcare supply chains have resulted in an increase in stockouts, [...] Read more.
The healthcare supply chain is a complex adaptive ecosystem that facilitates the delivery of health products to the end patient in a cost-effective way. However, low forecast accuracy and high demand volatility in healthcare supply chains have resulted in an increase in stockouts, operational inefficiencies, poor health outcomes, and a significant increase in supply chain costs. To cope with these challenges, organisations are trying to adopt demand-driven supply chain management (DDSCM) operating practices which have been established in other sectors such as the telecommunications, fruit, and flower industries. However, previous studies have not considered these practices in the healthcare industry, and hence no methodologies exist that support the implementation of these practices in this context. Moreover, current studies present cases where the focus has been on improving and expanding individual organisational performance, but no supply chain network-level studies exist on the healthcare industry. Therefore, this paper provides a network-level analysis when addressing DDSCM in the healthcare industry. A grounded theory-based approach coupled with a conceptual framework analysis process was used to leverage a systematized literature review methodology with the development of a network maturity mapping tool for DDSCM which was validated in the public healthcare sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Coping with Loss Aversion and Risk Management in the Supply Chain Coordination
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4364; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13084364 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 638
Abstract
In this paper, we apply a combined revenue sharing and buyback contract to investigate the channel coordination of a two-echelon supply chain with a loss-averse retailer. Since loss-averse decision makers usually take on more risks, the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) measure is introduced to [...] Read more.
In this paper, we apply a combined revenue sharing and buyback contract to investigate the channel coordination of a two-echelon supply chain with a loss-averse retailer. Since loss-averse decision makers usually take on more risks, the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) measure is introduced to hedge against it and the retailer’s objective is to maximize the CVaR of utility. We obtain the retailer’s optimal order quantity under the combined contract. It is shown that there is a unique wholesale price coordinating the supply chain if the retailer’s confidence level is less than a threshold that is independent of contract parameters. Moreover, a complete sensitivity analysis of parameters is carried out. In particular, the retailer’s optimal order quantity and coordinating wholesale price decreases as the loss aversion or confidence level increases, while it increase as the buyback price or sharing coefficient increases. Furthermore, there exists the situation where the combined contract can coordinate the chain even though neither the revenue sharing nor buyback contract can when the contract parameters are constrained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Coordination Mechanism of Dual-Channel Supply Chains Considering Retailer Innovation Inputs
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 813; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13020813 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1001
Abstract
In response to the online channels established by manufacturers, physical retailers are starting to offer innovative services, which will intensify conflicts between manufacturers and retailers. Considering that the conflict will affect the operation efficiency and sustainable development of the supply chain, the coordination [...] Read more.
In response to the online channels established by manufacturers, physical retailers are starting to offer innovative services, which will intensify conflicts between manufacturers and retailers. Considering that the conflict will affect the operation efficiency and sustainable development of the supply chain, the coordination mechanism of a dual-channel supply chain has been established. In this study, we construct the Stackelberg game model based on consumer utility theory to analyze the complex mechanism of retailers’ innovation input level affecting supply chain operation and design the double coordination mechanism. The results show that: (1) an optimal combination of wholesale prices, retail prices and innovation input levels can optimize the operational efficiency of the supply chain, (2) Noncooperation among channel members affects the retailer’s product pricing, decreases the market share of the physical channel and increases the market demand of manufacturers, (3) The dual coordination mechanism can alleviate channel conflicts, which can improve the operational efficiency of the supply chain. This study provides several insights on the theory of organizational coordination and sustainable development in conflicts of dual-channel supply chains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Customer Behavioral Reactions to Negative Experiences during the Product Return
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 448; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13020448 - 06 Jan 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1138
Abstract
This paper takes a closer look at customer experience during product return and the customer’s ability to share information about it. The research process included the development of research tools such as questionnaires. Anonymous surveys were conducted by computer assisted web interview among [...] Read more.
This paper takes a closer look at customer experience during product return and the customer’s ability to share information about it. The research process included the development of research tools such as questionnaires. Anonymous surveys were conducted by computer assisted web interview among individual customers from Poland on a sample 327 respondents. Non-stratified random sampling was used, as we considered it to be the most effective in terms of the effort-benefit ratio of the survey. A contingency table was constructed from the responses, the observed values and expected values were compared, and the Pearson Chi-square and the p-value of Fisher’s exact test were calculated. The research process carried out as well as the analysis of the obtained results allowed us to respond to the research questions. As a result, it can be stated that the clients, both satisfied (80.1%) and dissatisfied (84,4%), tended to share their opinion about return experience with other potential clients. Moreover, 42.2% of the respondents declared that they would not buy again from a seller after an unsuccessful return operation. The presented conclusions enrich the theoretical understanding of customer behavior and their purchase intention. It also offers retailers a quantitative benchmark and new perspective on the design of return policy in order to improve customer satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Proposal for a Maturity Model in Sustainability in the Supply Chain
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9655; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229655 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 920
Abstract
Sustainability has become a relevant element for organizations due to several motivators: companies adopt sustainability practices in need for regulatory compliance, anticipation of regulatory changes, understanding of limited natural resources, and a desire to limit expenditure associated with resource consumption and waste disposal. [...] Read more.
Sustainability has become a relevant element for organizations due to several motivators: companies adopt sustainability practices in need for regulatory compliance, anticipation of regulatory changes, understanding of limited natural resources, and a desire to limit expenditure associated with resource consumption and waste disposal. Thus, this article aims to identify the gaps present in maturity models, present an integrator theoretical model that considers the characteristic elements of the models present in the literature and affects the level of maturity in sustainability. The construction of the integrator theoretical model was based on the following stages: research questions; theoretical framework on Supply Chain Management; sustainability and concept of maturity model; maturity models and performance measurement systems; interpretation/analysis of research; and construction of the integrator theoretical model. The literature review was carried out in the Scopus and Web of Science databases. The main conclusions: maturity models focus on only one aspect or are excessively broad and do not include in detail the elements necessary to measure the level of maturity in sustainability. The proposed model aims to mitigate these gaps with the addition of the cross-sectional dimension, which offers an integrated and holistic view in relation to the other dimensions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Energy Recovery through End-of-Life Vehicles Recycling in Developing Countries
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8764; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12218764 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1057
Abstract
End-of-life vehicle (ELV) recycling is a process that spends energy and could be an energy source as well. This part of energy recovering depends on many different factors related to the broad and local aspects of ELV recycling. The ELV recycling process is [...] Read more.
End-of-life vehicle (ELV) recycling is a process that spends energy and could be an energy source as well. This part of energy recovering depends on many different factors related to the broad and local aspects of ELV recycling. The ELV recycling process is consuming energy from different energy sources (electrical, fossil), however, this consumption is lower in relation to energy consumption during the production of new vehicle parts from the very beginning. This article attempts to promote an integrated approach in the analysis of the problem of energy recovery through ELV recycling. Authors aim to analyze the ELV recycling process as an energy generator and to present possibilities for its energy recovery. The research analyses are based on the empirical investigation of ELV recycling in the Republic of Serbia, as a developing country, and on defined statistical model presenting the impact of ELV recycling on energy generation, spending, and conservation during one-year intervals. Research results showed that the higher ELV generation rates may led to a higher energy recovery, and environmental and socio-economic sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Improving Green Market Orientation, Green Supply Chain Relationship Quality, and Green Absorptive Capacity to Enhance Green Competitive Advantage in the Green Supply Chain
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7251; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187251 - 04 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 869
Abstract
This study examines the influences of market orientation, supply chain relationship quality, and absorptive capacity on competitive advantage in green supply chains. We examine the intensity of these relationships in a green supply chain context. This study aims to figure out the effects [...] Read more.
This study examines the influences of market orientation, supply chain relationship quality, and absorptive capacity on competitive advantage in green supply chains. We examine the intensity of these relationships in a green supply chain context. This study aims to figure out the effects of green market orientation (GMO), green supply chain relationship quality (GRQ), and green absorptive capacity (GAC) on green competitive advantage (GCA) in a supply chain. We find a significant positive association between these constructs. It highlights the importance of antecedents such as GMO, GRQ, and GAC on improving GCA. We jointly investigate the effects of GMO, GRQ, and GAC on green supply chain competitive advantage. This study uses Process Macro 2.15 to test the mediation effect between GMO and GCA. The result shows that GRQ and GAC completely mediate the relationship between GMO and GCA and that the effect sizes are 0.11 and 0.20, respectively. This study also reruns the model to clarify whether competing models are better than our model. However, the performance of such a competing model is poor. Finally, we accept our model instead of the competing model. GMO and GRQ among team managers and employees appear to contribute positively to GCA. Although GAC does not directly influence GCA, GMO has a significant total effect on GCA when intervened by GRQ and GAC. The key contribution is that green market orientation, i.e., the employee culture and the emphasis on being environmentally responsible, is a key antecedent to GRQ, GAC, and GCA. Managerial implications of the findings are listed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Development of Key Processes along the Supply Chain by Implementing the ISO 22000 Standard
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 6176; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12156176 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1360
Abstract
The aim of the article is to answer the question of whether the implementation of the requirements of the ISO 22000 standard in the food supply chain can support the implementation of key processes occurring in them, and thus increase the level of [...] Read more.
The aim of the article is to answer the question of whether the implementation of the requirements of the ISO 22000 standard in the food supply chain can support the implementation of key processes occurring in them, and thus increase the level of food quality and minimize its waste. The research was conducted out among several European countries, and an attempt was carried out to compare how the standard is perceived by entrepreneurs operating in Poland, Slovakia (Central and Eastern Europe), and Portugal (Western Europe). Covering the Polish, Slovak, and Portuguese organizations with the research process resulted from the fact that in recent years in these countries, an increase in the diversity of food demand and fragmentation of the food market has been observed. This forced food supply chains to be strictly focused on increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of production and distribution systems, as well as taking into account customer requirements and the implementation of sustainable solutions. Based on the results of the research, it can be concluded that the implementation of the requirements of the ISO 22000 standard along food supply chains can positively affect the implementation of key processes and thus contribute to reducing food waste at each stage of the supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
The Influence of ISO 9001 & ISO 14001 on Sustainable Supply Chain Management in the Textile Industry
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4282; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12104282 - 23 May 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1964
Abstract
The examination of implementing ISO standards can provide new insight as to their quality and environmental management benefits. These insights can be more impactful in manufacturing sectors and especially textiles as this sector is known for its environmental degradation and questionable supply chain [...] Read more.
The examination of implementing ISO standards can provide new insight as to their quality and environmental management benefits. These insights can be more impactful in manufacturing sectors and especially textiles as this sector is known for its environmental degradation and questionable supply chain practices. This exploratory study investigates the extent to which organizations that implement either ISO 9001 or 14001 standards impact sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). We also investigate the extent to which these two standards improve SSCM for the textile industry within a block of European countries consisting of Poland, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic. In this empirical study, we use several measures to help identify the extent of impacts of examined standardized management systems on improvements in different processes of SSCM. Our contributions to the field include finding that quality management systems support environmental processes, relationships with stakeholders, processes within the supply chain, and SSCM. Other findings include implementing environmental management system standards impact the rationalization of other processes. Finally, we find more significant supply chain impacts with the implementation of both standards than by either standard alone. The study concludes with suggestions for extension of this study and opportunities for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Coordination of Store Brand Product’s Green Supply Chain Based on Negotiation
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3637; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12093637 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 887
Abstract
The environmental input of a store brand product’s green supply chain plays an important role in improving the product brand image and expanding the product demand. According to the difference of the initial one-off environmental investment of the store brand product, it can [...] Read more.
The environmental input of a store brand product’s green supply chain plays an important role in improving the product brand image and expanding the product demand. According to the difference of the initial one-off environmental investment of the store brand product, it can be divided into three modes: direct OEM, retailer’s full participation and retailer’s partial participation. The research methods employed in this study include model establishment, numerical analysis and comparison under three entrustment modes based on retailers’ negotiation strength. In addition, sensitivity analysis was used to test the influence of parameter variations on the results. The research results show that: (i) the direct OEM mode is the best choice for retailers when the retailer is in a weak position, but it is not the best choice for the manufacturer. With the increase of the retailers’ negotiation strength, the profits of both sides will decline, causing the problem of double marginal profit decreasing; (ii) the retailer’s full participation mode is the best choice for the manufacturer when the retailer is in a strong position, but not the best choice for the retailer. It is not the best choice for both sides when the retailer is in a weak position; (iii) the greenness and total profit of the supply chain are no relative with the negotiation strength of the retailer under the partial participation mode, and the greenness and total profit of the supply chain are the same as the condition under the integrated control to achieve the best coordination effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Development)
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