Special Issue "Psychosis in Women"

A special issue of Women (ISSN 2673-4184).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mary V. Seeman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
Interests: schizophrenia; women's mental health; antipsychotic medication
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Whatever the form of psychosis, women do not necessarily present clinically in the same way as men. Age of presentation may differ as well symptoms, help seeking, progression, and response to treatment. Triggers for the development of psychotic reactions are often more prevalent in one sex than the other due to different rates of exposure. For instance, vulnerability during reproductive periods and the prescription of exogenous hormones are problems that are unique to women. The problems caused by psychosis also differ in men and women, whether they are problems of general health, victimization, violence, child bearing, child rearing, or tasks of caregiving or survival. This Special Issue of Women will explore these issues and will provide clinical recommendations for best practice.

Prof. Dr. Mary V. Seeman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Women is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender
  • psychosis
  • diagnosis
  • victimization
  • violence
  • treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

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Review
Psychiatric Partial Hospitalization Programs: Following World Health Organization Guidelines with a Special Focus on Women with Delusional Disorder
Women 2021, 1(2), 80-96; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1020008 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 578
Abstract
The World Health Organization (WHO) developed a 7-year Mental Health Action Plan in 2013, which recommends integration of health and social care services into community-based settings, implementation of strategies for health promotion and prevention of illness, and support of research. In this review, [...] Read more.
The World Health Organization (WHO) developed a 7-year Mental Health Action Plan in 2013, which recommends integration of health and social care services into community-based settings, implementation of strategies for health promotion and prevention of illness, and support of research. In this review, we highlight partial hospitalization programs (PHPs) for delusional disorder (DD), with a special focus on the health and psychosocial needs of women. We suggest that PHPs are, in many ways, ideal settings for carrying out WHO recommendations. PHPs are multidisciplinary and consequently are able to provide a wide range of flexible program offerings. Programming in PHPs is able to address, with proven efficacy, individual needs, such as those presented by women at the various stages of their reproductive life. PHPs are a community bridge between hospital and outpatient services and can quickly adapt to specific needs as affected by gender, but also by age and cultural origins. They are ideal settings for professional training and for conducting clinical research. PHPs operate on the principle of shared decision making, and thus more readily than many other treatment sites, engaging difficult-to-treat patients, such as those with DD, by successfully establishing long-term relationships of trust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosis in Women)
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Review
Care for Women with Delusional Disorder: Towards a Specialized Approach
Women 2021, 1(1), 46-59; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1010004 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1077
Abstract
Delusional disorder is a difficult-to-treat clinical condition with health needs that are often undertreated. Although individuals with delusional disorder may be high functioning in daily life, they suffer from serious health complaints that may be sex-specific. The main aim of this narrative review [...] Read more.
Delusional disorder is a difficult-to-treat clinical condition with health needs that are often undertreated. Although individuals with delusional disorder may be high functioning in daily life, they suffer from serious health complaints that may be sex-specific. The main aim of this narrative review is to address these sex-specific health needs and to find ways of integrating their management into service programs. Age is an important issue. Delusional disorder most often first occurs in middle to late adult life, a time that corresponds to menopause in women, and menopausal age correlates with increased development of both somatic and psychological health problems in women. It is associated with a rise in the prevalence of depression and a worsening of prior psychotic symptoms. Importantly, women with delusional disorder show low compliance rates with both psychiatric treatment and with medical/surgical referrals. Intervention at the patient, provider, and systems levels are needed to address these ongoing problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosis in Women)
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Review
Schizophrenia Psychosis in Women
Women 2021, 1(1), 1-15; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1010001 - 15 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 922
Abstract
A first step towards personalized medicine is to consider whether, for some disorders, the safest and most effective treatment of women needs to differ from standard guideline recommendations developed on the basis of clinical trials conducted, for the most part, in men. A [...] Read more.
A first step towards personalized medicine is to consider whether, for some disorders, the safest and most effective treatment of women needs to differ from standard guideline recommendations developed on the basis of clinical trials conducted, for the most part, in men. A second step is to consider how women’s reproductive stages—pre-pubertal years, menstrual phases, pregnancy trimesters, lactation and postpartum periods, menopausal and postmenopausal/aging status—affect the optimal choice of treatment. This review focuses on these two steps in the treatment of psychosis, specifically schizophrenia. It discusses genetics, precursors and symptoms of schizophrenia, reproductive and associated ethical issues, antipsychotic drug response and adverse effects, substance abuse, victimization and perpetration of violence, and issues of immigration and of co-morbidity. The conclusions, while often based on clinical experience and theoretical considerations rather than strictly on the evidence of randomized controlled trials, are that clinical recommendations need to consider clinical and role differences that exist between men and women and make appropriate correction for age and reproductive status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosis in Women)

Other

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Systematic Review
Sex Selection Bias in Schizophrenia Antipsychotic Trials—An Update Systematic Review
Women 2021, 1(2), 97-108; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1020009 - 20 May 2021
Viewed by 593
Abstract
The lack of female participation in antipsychotic trials for schizophrenia poses an important issue regarding its applicability, with direct and real-life repercussions to clinical practice. Here, our aim is to systematically review the sampling sex bias among randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of second-generation [...] Read more.
The lack of female participation in antipsychotic trials for schizophrenia poses an important issue regarding its applicability, with direct and real-life repercussions to clinical practice. Here, our aim is to systematically review the sampling sex bias among randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of second-generation antipsychotics—namely risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole—as an update to a previous 2005 review. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane database for studies published through 7 September 2020 that assessed adult samples of at least 50 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, or broad psychosis, in order to investigate the percentage of women recruited and associated factors. Our review included 148 RCTs, published from 1993 to 2020, encompassing 43,961 subjects. Overall, the mean proportion of women was 34%, but only 17 trials included 50% or more females. Younger samples, studies conducted in North America, pharmaceutical funding and presence of specific exclusion criteria for women (i.e., pregnancy, breast-feeding or lack of reliable contraceptive) were associated with a lower prevalence of women in the trials. Considering the possible different effects of antipsychotics in both sexes, and our lack of knowledge on the subject due to sampling bias, it is imperative to expand actions aimed at bridging this gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosis in Women)
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