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Article

Daily Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity as an Indicator of Disaster Recovery: A Hurricane Harvey Case Study

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3
Department of Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
4
Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2836; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162836
Received: 18 June 2019 / Revised: 24 July 2019 / Accepted: 27 July 2019 / Published: 8 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters and Their Consequences for Public Health)
Changes in levels and patterns of physical activity might be a mechanism to assess and inform disaster recovery through the lens of wellbeing. However, few studies have examined disaster impacts on physical activity or the potential for physical activity to serve as an indicator of disaster recovery. In this exploratory study, we examined daily bicycle and pedestrian counts from four public bicycle/pedestrian trails in Houston, before and after Hurricane Harvey landfall, to assess if physical activity returned to pre-Harvey levels. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to examine the immediate impact of Harvey landfall on physical activity; t-tests were performed to assess if trail usage returned to pre-Harvey levels. Hurricane Harvey was found to have a significant negative impact on daily pedestrian and bicycle counts for three of the four trails. Daily pedestrian and bicycle counts were found to return to pre-Harvey or higher levels at 6 weeks post-landfall at all locations studied. We discuss the potential for further research to examine the trends, feasibility, validity, and limitations of using bicycle and pedestrian use levels as a proxy for disaster recovery and wellbeing among affected populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: wellbeing; physical activity; disaster recovery wellbeing; physical activity; disaster recovery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Doubleday, A.; Choe, Y.; Miles, S.; Errett, N.A. Daily Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity as an Indicator of Disaster Recovery: A Hurricane Harvey Case Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2836. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162836

AMA Style

Doubleday A, Choe Y, Miles S, Errett NA. Daily Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity as an Indicator of Disaster Recovery: A Hurricane Harvey Case Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(16):2836. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162836

Chicago/Turabian Style

Doubleday, Annie, Youngjun Choe, Scott Miles, and Nicole A. Errett 2019. "Daily Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity as an Indicator of Disaster Recovery: A Hurricane Harvey Case Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 16: 2836. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162836

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