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Article

Effect of Temperature and Time on Oxygen Consumption by Olive Fruit: Empirical Study and Simulation in a Non-Ventilated Container

1
Department of Biochemistry and Technology of Plant Foods, Instituto de la Grasa, Spanish National Research Council, Ctra. Sevilla Utrera, km 1, Edifice 46, 41013 Seville, Spain
2
Department of Crystallography, Mineralogy and Agricultural Chemistry, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Agronómica, Universidad de Sevilla, Ctra. Sevilla Utrera, km 1, 41013 Seville, Spain
3
Department of Mechanic, Campus Rabanales, University of Córdoba, Ed. Leonardo Da Vinci, Ctra. Nacional IV, km 396, 14014 Córdoba, Spain
4
Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Seville, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Claudia Gonzalez Viejo and Sigfredo Fuentes
Received: 1 September 2021 / Revised: 15 September 2021 / Accepted: 20 September 2021 / Published: 23 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Digital Technologies on Beverage Fermentation)
Fermentation processes within olive fruit jeopardize the quality of the extracted oil. Aeration, temperature, and time play a crucial role in attaining the critical threshold at which an aerobic respiration shifts towards anaerobic. In this work, the O2 consumption and CO2 production of olive fruit kept in a closed container at different temperatures (5–45 °C) were measured over 7 h. The data allowed us to describe the relationship between the temperature and the respiration rate as an Arrhenius function and simulate the oxygen consumption in the inner part of a container full of fruit with low aeration, considering the generated respiration heat over time. The simulation revealed that olives risk shifting to anaerobic respiration after 3 h at 25 °C and less than 2 h at 35 °C when kept in a non-ventilated environment. The results underline the irreversible damage that high day temperatures can produce during the time before fruit processing, especially during transport. Lowering, as soon as possible, the field temperature thus comes to the fore as a necessary strategy to guarantee the quality of the olives before their processing, like most of the fruit that is harvested at excessive temperatures. View Full-Text
Keywords: Fermentation; Olea europaea; respiration rate; storage conditions; transport Fermentation; Olea europaea; respiration rate; storage conditions; transport
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MDPI and ACS Style

Plasquy, E.; Florido, M.C.; Sola-Guirado, R.R.; García Martos, J.M.; García Martín, J.F. Effect of Temperature and Time on Oxygen Consumption by Olive Fruit: Empirical Study and Simulation in a Non-Ventilated Container. Fermentation 2021, 7, 200. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation7040200

AMA Style

Plasquy E, Florido MC, Sola-Guirado RR, García Martos JM, García Martín JF. Effect of Temperature and Time on Oxygen Consumption by Olive Fruit: Empirical Study and Simulation in a Non-Ventilated Container. Fermentation. 2021; 7(4):200. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation7040200

Chicago/Turabian Style

Plasquy, Eddy, María C. Florido, Rafael R. Sola-Guirado, José M. García Martos, and Juan F. García Martín. 2021. "Effect of Temperature and Time on Oxygen Consumption by Olive Fruit: Empirical Study and Simulation in a Non-Ventilated Container" Fermentation 7, no. 4: 200. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation7040200

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