Special Issue "Climate Resilient Cities and Communities"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christopher Robin Bryant
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: the adaptation of human activities to climatic change, especially agriculture; sustainable community development; rural development; land use planning; strategic management/planning of development including agriculture; community participation; the dynamics and planning of urban agriculture; including pioneer work on adaptation behavior under stressful conditions; sustainable transport policies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and variability (CCV) has finally become a recognized world phenomenon. Apart from the multitude of attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which is one of the issues human society has to cope with, there are also the impacts on human activities and how to manage the continuation of human activities in many different territories, cities, and communities. It is no easy matter to face and undertake appropriate actions to reduce the negative impacts of CCV on many activities, such as agriculture and fishing and as well on cities and communities where the bulk of the world’s population live. Resilience implies the ability to endure the negative impacts of CCV on cities and communities and their economic activities upon which cities and communities are generally based. How can we continue despite the difficulties that CCV has often caused to cities and communities? How can cities and communities become resilient? Can our governments take on the challenges of this and contribute to building resilience in our cities and communities? What other actors can play important roles in building resilience in response to CCV? In this Special Issue, we plan to encourage researchers to communicate practitioners’, citizens’, and hopefully politicians’ ability to participate in demonstrating how some cities and communities have managed to build resilience in the face of CCV, something that requires a great deal of openness and patience on the part of the actors involved. We are interested, then, in how resilient cities and communities have been able to emerge and keep their citizens involved and the activities in their cities and communities able to come to terms with the effects of CCV and contribute to building, managing, and maintaining resilient and sustainable cities and communities. 

Prof. Dr. Christopher Bryant
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change and variability
  • resilience building
  • co-resilience
  • building and maintaining climate resilient cities and communities
  • resilience building actors
  • participation of citizens of all types in resilience building in the face of CCV

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Uncovering Engagement Networks for Adaptation in Three Regional Communities: Empirical Examples from New South Wales, Australia
Climate 2021, 9(2), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli9020021 - 21 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1211
Abstract
Climate change is a significant challenge for policy makers, planners and communities. While adaptation responses are generally recognised to be place-based, policy processes on adaptation often reside with central (state or national) governments that may be remote from regional communities. In this paper, [...] Read more.
Climate change is a significant challenge for policy makers, planners and communities. While adaptation responses are generally recognised to be place-based, policy processes on adaptation often reside with central (state or national) governments that may be remote from regional communities. In this paper, we contribute to the literature regarding how diverse regional communities engage with planning and policy for climate adaptation, which is important for successful implementation. We adopt a social network analysis (SNA) approach that enables an exploration of the interaction of community networks with policy information. There are limited empirical studies of information sharing about climate adaptation policy through community knowledge networks. One previous study, located in coastal New South Wales, Australia, mapped the community’s knowledge acquisition and diffusion to reveal the underlying network structures that influenced policy engagement pathways. However, further studies are needed to determine how the features of community networks may change with local context (e.g., coastal versus inland). This paper extends previous studies to compare and contrast adaptation knowledge networks in three NSW communities: Shoalhaven (the original coastal study site), Bega (coastal) and Orange (inland). Findings suggest that the presence of a natural resource-dependent industry, local geographies and boundary spanners acting as network knowledge brokers are factors influencing community knowledge flows. The work further demonstrates the utility of SNA to measure knowledge networks that can inform government engagement and communication with communities on climate adaptation policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Resilient Cities and Communities)
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Article
Determinants of Household-Level Coping Strategies and Recoveries from Riverine Flood Disasters: Empirical Evidence from the Right Bank of Teesta River, Bangladesh
Climate 2021, 9(1), 4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli9010004 - 29 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 920
Abstract
Although recurrent floods cause detrimental impact for the people living in riverine floodplains, households are taking up various risks management strategies to deal with them. This paper examined household’s post-disaster coping strategies to respond and recover from riverine floods in 2017. Data were [...] Read more.
Although recurrent floods cause detrimental impact for the people living in riverine floodplains, households are taking up various risks management strategies to deal with them. This paper examined household’s post-disaster coping strategies to respond and recover from riverine floods in 2017. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from 377 households from the right bank of Teesta River in Bangladesh. Households employed different coping strategies including borrowing money, assets disposal, consumption reduction, temporary migration, and grants from external sources, to cope with flood. Results from logistic regression models suggested that increasing severity of flood reduced households’ consumption. Exposed households were more likely to borrow money. Consumption reduction and temporary migration were mostly adopted by agricultural landless households. Income from nonfarm sources was found to be an important factor influencing household’s decisions on coping. Furthermore, households that recovered from the last flood disaster seek insurance through their own savings and available physical assets, highlighting the role of disaster preparedness in resilient recovery. This study calls for the policy intervention at the household-level to enhance the adaptive capacity of riverine households so that people at risk can cope better and recover from flood disaster using their resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Resilient Cities and Communities)
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