Special Issue "Dental Ceramics and Metal-Free Materials in The Digital Workflow"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gianrico Spagnuolo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: dental materials; dental surgery; restorative dentistry and endodontics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Roberto Sorrentino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University “Federico II” of Naples, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: prosthodontics; adhesive dentistry; dental materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the development of novel technologies and innovative restorative materials have opened the way to digital dentistry, widening treatment options and operative approaches in prosthetic and restorative dentistry. 

The introduction of intraoral scanners and advanced fabrication processes like CAD-CAM technologies and 3D printing has allowed the implementation of innovative dental ceramics and metal-free materials, offering the chance to substitute conventional metal frameworks and improving the esthetic outcome of restorations. In addition, the outstanding mechanical properties of these new-generation materials have allowed reducing the biological sacrifice of dental tissues, reinterpreting preparation geometries and operative procedures in a more conservative way.

Technopolymers, hybrid composites, polycrystalline and high-strength ceramics offer undeniable advantages such as excellent mechanical resistance, astounding esthetic and optical properties, reliable precision and accuracy, reducing, at the same time, chairside and production time.

Clinicians can profit from these improvements in the digital workflow, which make operative procedures easier, standardized, and repeatable and improve, in turn, patients’ compliance and comfort.

Prof. Dr. Gianrico Spagnuolo
Prof. Dr. Roberto Sorrentino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • prosthodontics
  • digital workflow
  • digital dentistry
  • dental ceramics
  • metal-free
  • restorative dentistry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparison of Intraoral and Extraoral Digital Scanners: Evaluation of Surface Topography and Precision
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 52; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8020052 - 20 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1377
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface topography and the precision measurements of different intraoral and extraoral digital scanners. A reference model of a maxillary arch with four implant analogs was prepared and scanned by three intraoral and two extraoral [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface topography and the precision measurements of different intraoral and extraoral digital scanners. A reference model of a maxillary arch with four implant analogs was prepared and scanned by three intraoral and two extraoral scanners. The reference model was scanned fifteen times with each digital scanning system, investigating the surface topography and precision measurements for the same-arch and cross-arch measurements. The data was exported to 3D inspection and mesh-processing software (GOM Inspect, Braunschweig, Germany). Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with the Tukey method for pairwise comparisons. The effect of parameters on generating the surface topography was analyzed by Univariate Linear Regression Analysis. Of the scanner systems evaluated, iTero (IT) exhibited the most number of triangulation points, followed by Trios 3 Shape (TR) and Straumann Cares (SC). There were no significant differences observed in the surface topography when comparing flat and contoured surfaces, the anterior and posterior position, and interproximal areas. For the precision measurement in the same quadrant, no statistical difference was noted between intra- and extraoral scanners. However, the extraoral scanners showed substantially higher precision measurements for the cross-arch measurement. Surface topography did not correlate to precision. Rather, precision correlated with the scanning mechanism. For a quadrant scanning, both intraoral and extraoral scanners are recommended, but extraoral scanners are recommended for a full-arch scanning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Ceramics and Metal-Free Materials in The Digital Workflow)
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Article
Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polymers for Aligner Manufacturing: In Vitro Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 47; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8020047 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
The use of metal-free thermoplastic materials plays a key role in the orthodontic digital workflow due to the increasing demand for clear aligner treatments. Three thermoplastic polymers commonly used to fabricate clear aligners, namely Duran®, Biolon® and Zendura®, [...] Read more.
The use of metal-free thermoplastic materials plays a key role in the orthodontic digital workflow due to the increasing demand for clear aligner treatments. Three thermoplastic polymers commonly used to fabricate clear aligners, namely Duran®, Biolon® and Zendura®, were investigated to evaluate the effect of thermoforming (T.), storage in artificial saliva (S.A.S.) and their combination on their mechanical properties. Elastic modulus and yield stress of the specimens were characterized. Each material was characterized for each condition through tensile tests (ISO527-1). The results showed that thermoforming does not lead to a significant decrease in yield stress, except for Zendura® that showed about a 30% decrease. An increase of the elastic modulus of Duran® and Zendura®, instead, was observed after thermoforming. The same increase was noticed for the yield stress of Duran®. For S.A.S. specimens, the elastic modulus generally decreases compared to supplier condition (A.S.) and simply thermoformed material. A decrease of yield stress, instead, is significant for Zendura®. The results demonstrated that the impact of the operating conditions on the mechanical properties can vary according to the specific polymer. To design reliable and effective orthodontic treatments, the materials should be selected after their mechanical properties are characterized in the simulated intraoral environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Ceramics and Metal-Free Materials in The Digital Workflow)
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Article
Comparing the Repair of Veneered Zirconia Crowns with Ceramic or Composite Resin: An in Vitro Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 37; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8020037 - 27 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1388
Abstract
Statement of problem: Current techniques for repairing porcelain-chipped restorations have several limitations. With advances in CAD/CAM technology, the combination of resin cements and high-strength ceramic materials might offer new options for repairing the chipping of veneering ceramic. Purpose: The purpose of this study [...] Read more.
Statement of problem: Current techniques for repairing porcelain-chipped restorations have several limitations. With advances in CAD/CAM technology, the combination of resin cements and high-strength ceramic materials might offer new options for repairing the chipping of veneering ceramic. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the load-to-failure of veneered zirconia crowns repaired by different materials. Material and Methods: Veneered zirconia crowns were made on aluminum dies (n = 10/group). Feldspathic porcelain (Vita VM9, Vident) was applied to the zirconia coping (Vita In-Ceram YZ, Vident) in a cylindrical shape (Ø 10.5 mm, height 7.5 mm). A bevel cut on the porcelain veneer (45 degree, 3 mm width) was made at one side of each crown to simulate porcelain chipping. The crowns were then divided into four different groups according to the repair materials: 1. Conventional resin composite (A; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent); 2. Flowable resin composite (B; G-aenial Universal Flo, GC america); 3. CAD/CAM milled feldspathic ceramic (C; Vita Trilux Forte, Vident); 4. CAD/CAM milled lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (D; IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). Resin cement (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent) was used to cement the CAD/CAM ceramic materials to the beveled crowns. Each crown underwent 5000 cycles of thermocycling. The strength test was performed on an Instron universal testing machine by loading force on the center of repaired part to record load-to-failure. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). Results: Mean loads-to-failure (in Newton +/− SD) of repaired veneered zirconia crowns were: Gr. A: 660.0 ± 200.5; Gr. B: 681.7 ± 175.9; Gr. C: 1236.0 ± 188.8; Gr. D: 1536.3 ± 286.1. Catastrophic failure was the most dominant failure mode in every group. Few specimens exhibited cohesive failure. Only one specimen in group D had adhesive failure. Conclusions: Within the limitation of the study, veneered zirconia crowns repaired with CAD/CAM ceramic materials have significantly higher load-to-failure than veneered crowns repaired with resin composite (p ≤ 0.05). Clinical Implications: Traditionally, porcelain-chipped restorations are often repaired with resin composite and bonding technique. Repairing chipped porcelain with CAD/CAM ceramics fitting the fractured parts can be alternative option with potential advantages. More well-designed studies are necessary to justify this novel repair technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Ceramics and Metal-Free Materials in The Digital Workflow)
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