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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Responses to Low-Intensity Exposures 2.0"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nadezhda S. Kudryasheva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biophysics, Federal Research Center, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Interests: physicochemistry of biological objects; molecular spectroscopy; structure of molecules; chemiluminescence; bioluminescence; low-dose effects; hormesis; toxicity; radiotoxicity; antioxidant activity; bioactive compounds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Low-intensity exposures are the most unexplored field of modern molecular toxicology. A lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of low-intensive factors causes problems in (a) the prediction of biological effects, (b) overcoming negative consequences, and (c) application of positive results. Therefore, the analysis of low impacts is topical from both fundamental and applied standpoints, particularly for ecology, biology, and medicine.

Modern toxicology uses three dose–response models: linear, threshold, and hormesis. The latter implies an activation of physiological functions at low-dose exposures and their inhibition at higher doses and describes these effects in terms of ‘adaptive response’ and ‘toxicity’, respectively. It is supposed that the hormesis model can be applied as a basic one, transforming to the other models under definite restrictions.

Studies of biological responses to bioactive compounds, radiation of different types, etc. under the conditions of low-intensity exposures are encouraged. A chemical and biochemical basis for these responses is of interest.

Prof. Dr. Nadezhda S. Kudryasheva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • low-intensity exposures
  • bioactive compounds
  • low-dose radiation
  • hormesis
  • toxicity
  • adaptive response
  • antioxidant activity
  • molecular mechanisms
  • physicochemical processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Dose-Dependent Effects of Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma on the Mesenchymal Stem and Osteosarcoma Cells In Vitro
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(13), 6797; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22136797 - 24 Jun 2021
Viewed by 580
Abstract
The antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and tissue-stimulating effects of cold argon atmospheric plasma (CAAP) accelerate its use in various fields of medicine. Here, we investigated the effects of CAAP at different radiation doses on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human osteosarcoma (MNNG/HOS) cells. We observed [...] Read more.
The antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and tissue-stimulating effects of cold argon atmospheric plasma (CAAP) accelerate its use in various fields of medicine. Here, we investigated the effects of CAAP at different radiation doses on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human osteosarcoma (MNNG/HOS) cells. We observed an increase in the growth rate of MSCs at sufficiently low irradiation doses (10–15 min) of CAAP, while the growth of MNNG/HOS cells was slowed down to 41% at the same irradiation doses. Using flow cytometry, we found that these effects are associated with cell cycle arrest and extended death of cancer cells by necrosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was detected in both types of cells after 15 min of CAAP treatment. Evaluation of the genes’ transcriptional activity showed that exposure to low doses of CAAP activates the expression of genes responsible for proliferation, DNA replication, and transition between phases of the cell cycle in MSCs. There was a decrease in the transcriptional activity of most of the studied genes in MNNG/HOS osteosarcoma cancer cells. However, increased transcription of osteogenic differentiation genes was observed in normal and cancer cells. The selective effects of low and high doses of CAAP treatment on cancer and normal cells that we found can be considered in terms of hormesis. The low dose of cold argon plasma irradiation stimulated the vital processes in stem cells due to the slight generation of reactive oxygen species. In cancer cells, the same doses evidently lead to the formation of oxidative stress, which was accompanied by a proliferation inhibition and cell death. The differences in the cancer and normal cells’ responses are probably due to different sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Such a selective effect of CAAP action can be used in the combined therapy of oncological diseases such as skin neoplasms, or for the removal of remaining cancer cells after surgical removal of a tumor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Responses to Low-Intensity Exposures 2.0)
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Article
Toxicity and Antioxidant Activity of Fullerenol C60,70 with Low Number of Oxygen Substituents
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6382; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22126382 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 522
Abstract
Fullerene is a nanosized carbon structure with potential drug delivery applications. We studied the bioeffects of a water-soluble fullerene derivative, fullerenol, with 10-12 oxygen groups (F10-12); its structure was characterized by IR and XPS spectroscopy. A bioluminescent enzyme system was used to study [...] Read more.
Fullerene is a nanosized carbon structure with potential drug delivery applications. We studied the bioeffects of a water-soluble fullerene derivative, fullerenol, with 10-12 oxygen groups (F10-12); its structure was characterized by IR and XPS spectroscopy. A bioluminescent enzyme system was used to study toxic and antioxidant effects of F10-12 at the enzymatic level. Antioxidant characteristics of F10-12 were revealed in model solutions of organic and inorganic oxidizers. Low-concentration activation of bioluminescence was validated statistically in oxidizer solutions. Toxic and antioxidant characteristics of F10-12 were compared to those of homologous fullerenols with a higher number of oxygen groups:F24-28 and F40-42. No simple dependency was found between the toxic/antioxidant characteristics and the number of oxygen groups on the fullerene’s carbon cage. Lower toxicity and higher antioxidant activity of F24-28 were identified and presumptively attributed to its higher solubility. An active role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the bioeffects of F10-12 was demonstrated. Correlations between toxic/antioxidant characteristics of F10-12 and ROS content were evaluated. Toxic and antioxidant effects were related to the decrease in ROS content in the enzyme solutions. Our results reveal a complexity of ROS effects in the enzymatic assay system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Responses to Low-Intensity Exposures 2.0)
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